Women Writers And The Hero Of Romance

Author: J. Wilt
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137426985
Size: 20.97 MB
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Women Writers And The Hero Of Romance from the Author: J. Wilt. Women Writers and the Hero of Romance studies the nature of the hero and his meaning for the female seeker, or quester, in romance fiction from Wuthering Heights to Fifty Shades of Grey. The book includes chapters on Wuthering Heights, Middlemarch, The Scarlet Pimpernel, The Sheik, and the novels of Ayn Rand and Dorothy Dunnett.

Women Writers And Nineteenth Century Medievalism

Author: Clare Broome Saunders
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 023061857X
Size: 16.53 MB
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Women Writers And Nineteenth Century Medievalism from the Author: Clare Broome Saunders. Saunders uniquely explores how women poets, biographers, historians, and visual artists used medieval motifs, forms, and settings to enable them to comment more freely on controversial contemporary issues, such as war and gender roles.

Women Writers In Pre Revolutionary France

Author: Colette H. Winn
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9780815323679
Size: 18.66 MB
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Women Writers In Pre Revolutionary France from the Author: Colette H. Winn. This extensive collection of English-language essays examines the many strategies of resistance to male domination that women in France from the 16th through the 18th centuries utilized in their lives and their writings.

Byronic Heroes In Nineteenth Century Women S Writing And Screen Adaptation

Author: Sarah Wootton
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 113757934X
Size: 43.72 MB
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Byronic Heroes In Nineteenth Century Women S Writing And Screen Adaptation from the Author: Sarah Wootton. Byronic Heroes in Nineteenth-Century Women's Writing and Screen Adaptation charts a new chapter in the changing fortunes of a unique cultural phenomenon. This book examines the afterlives of the Byronic hero through the work of nineteenth-century women writers and screen adaptations of their fiction. It is a timely reassessment of Byron's enduring legacy during the nineteenth century and beyond, focusing on the charged and unstable literary dialogues between Jane Austen, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot and a Romantic icon whose presence takes centre stage in recent screen adaptations of their most celebrated novels. The broad interdisciplinary lens employed in this book concentrates on the conflicted rewritings of Byron's poetry, his 'heroic' protagonists, and the cult of Byronism in nineteenth-century novels from Pride and Prejudice to Middlemarch, and extends outwards to the reappearance of Byronic heroes on film and in television series over the last two decades.

Strangers At Home

Author: Rita Keresztesi
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803227671
Size: 49.98 MB
Format: PDF
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Strangers At Home from the Author: Rita Keresztesi. Strangers at Home reframes the way we conceive of the modernist literature that appeared in the period between the two world wars. This provocative work shows that a body of texts written by ethnic writers during this period poses a challenge to conventional notions of America and American modernism. By engaging with modernist literary studies from the perspectives of minority discourse, postcolonial studies, and postmodern theory, Rita Keresztesi questions the validity of modernism's claim to the neutrality of culture. She argues that literary modernism grew out of a prejudiced, racially biased, and often xenophobic historical context that necessitated a politically conservative and narrow definition of modernism in America. With the changing racial, ethnic, and cultural makeup of the nation during the interwar era, literary modernism also changed its form and content. ΓΈ Contesting traditional notions of literary modernism, Keresztesi examines American modernism from an ethnic perspective in the works of Harlem Renaissance, immigrant, and Native American writers. She discusses such authors as Countee Cullen, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Anzia Yezierska, Henry Roth, Josephina Niggli, Mourning Dove, D?Arcy McNickle, and John Joseph Mathews, among others. Strangers at Home makes a persuasive argument for expanding our understanding of the writers themselves as well as the concept of modernism as it is currently defined.

American Women Authors And Literary Property 1822 1869

Author: Melissa J. Homestead
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139446894
Size: 18.22 MB
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American Women Authors And Literary Property 1822 1869 from the Author: Melissa J. Homestead. Through an exploration of women authors' engagements with copyright and married women's property laws, American Women Authors and Literary Property, 1822–1869, revises nineteenth-century American literary history, making women's authorship and copyright law central. Using case studies of five popular fiction writers - Catharine Sedgwick, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Fanny Fern, Augusta Evans, and Mary Virginia Terhune - Homestead shows how the convergence of copyright and coverture both fostered and constrained white women's agency as authors. Women authors exploited their status as nonproprietary subjects to advantage by adapting themselves to a copyright law that privileged readers'access to literature over authors' property rights. Homestead's inclusion of the Confederacy in this work sheds light on the centrality of copyright to nineteenth-century American nationalisms and on the strikingly different construction of author reader relations under U.S. and Confederate copyright laws.

Mapping British Women Writers Urban Imaginaries

Author: Arina Cirstea
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 113753091X
Size: 71.48 MB
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Mapping British Women Writers Urban Imaginaries from the Author: Arina Cirstea. This study provides an alternative to the postmodern tradition of writing about the city by exploring spatialized constructions of gender and spiritual identity through an integrative framework based on insights from Bachelard's topoanalysis, psychogeography, feminist cultural theory and comparative literature and religion.

Reading The Romance

Author: Janice A. Radway
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807898856
Size: 73.77 MB
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Reading The Romance from the Author: Janice A. Radway. Originally published in 1984, Reading the Romance challenges popular (and often demeaning) myths about why romantic fiction, one of publishing's most lucrative categories, captivates millions of women readers. Among those who have disparaged romance reading are feminists, literary critics, and theorists of mass culture. They claim that romances enforce the woman reader's dependence on men and acceptance of the repressive ideology purveyed by popular culture. Radway questions such claims, arguing that critical attention "must shift from the text itself, taken in isolation, to the complex social event of reading." She examines that event, from the complicated business of publishing and distribution to the individual reader's engagement with the text. Radway's provocative approach combines reader-response criticism with anthropology and feminist psychology. Asking readers themselves to explore their reading motives, habits, and rewards, she conducted interviews in a midwestern town with forty-two romance readers whom she met through Dorothy Evans, a chain bookstore employee who has earned a reputation as an expert on romantic fiction. Evans defends her customers' choice of entertainment; reading romances, she tells Radway, is no more harmful than watching sports on television. "We read books so we won't cry" is the poignant explanation one woman offers for her reading habit. Indeed, Radway found that while the women she studied devote themselves to nurturing their families, these wives and mothers receive insufficient devotion or nurturance in return. In romances the women find not only escape from the demanding and often tiresome routines of their lives but also a hero who supplies the tenderness and admiring attention that they have learned not to expect. The heroines admired by Radway's group defy the expected stereotypes; they are strong, independent, and intelligent. That such characters often find themselves to be victims of male aggression and almost always resign themselves to accepting conventional roles in life has less to do, Radway argues, with the women readers' fantasies and choices than with their need to deal with a fear of masculine dominance. These romance readers resent not only the limited choices in their own lives but the patronizing atitude that men especially express toward their reading tastes. In fact, women read romances both to protest and to escape temporarily the narrowly defined role prescribed for them by a patriarchal culture. Paradoxically, the books that they read make conventional roles for women seem desirable. It is this complex relationship between culture, text, and woman reader that Radway urges feminists to address. Romance readers, she argues, should be encouraged to deliver their protests in the arena of actual social relations rather than to act them out in the solitude of the imagination. In a new introduction, Janice Radway places the book within the context of current scholarship and offers both an explanation and critique of the study's limitations.

Daughters Of Valor

Author: Jay L. Halio
Publisher: University of Delaware Press
ISBN: 9780874136111
Size: 48.72 MB
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Daughters Of Valor from the Author: Jay L. Halio. The essays in this book focus on a wide and representative variety of Jewish American women writers, including Cynthia Ozick, Anne Roiphe, Erica Jong, Pauline Kael, Allegra Goodman, Norma Rosen, Adrienne Rich, Lynn Sharon Schwartz, and others. In every instance the contributors have tried to deal not only with the Jewish content of their work but also with its literary quality and other major themes.

The Feminization Of Quest Romance

Author: Dana A. Heller
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292724713
Size: 54.78 MB
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The Feminization Of Quest Romance from the Author: Dana A. Heller. What happens when a woman dares to imagine herself a hero? Questing, she sets out for unknown regions. Lighting a torch, she elicits from the darkness stories never told or heard before. The woman hero sails against the tides of great legends that recount the adventures of heroic men, legends deemed universal, timeless, and essential to our understanding of the natural order that holds us and completes us in its spiral. Yet these myths and rituals do not fulfill her need for an empowering self-image nor do they grant her the mobility she requires to imagine, enact, and represent her quest for authentic self-knowledge. The Feminization of Quest-Romance proposes that a female quest is a revolutionary step in both literary and cultural terms. Indeed, despite the difficulty that women writers face in challenging myths, rituals, psychological theories, and literary conventions deemed universal by a culture that exalts masculine ideals and universalizes male experience, a number of revolutionary texts have come into existence in the second half of the twentieth century by such American women writers as Jean Stafford, Mary McCarthy, Anne Moody, Marilynne Robinson, and Mona Simpson, all of them working to redefine the literary portrayal of American women's quests. They work, in part, by presenting questing female characters who refuse to accept the roles accorded them by restrictive social norms, even if it means sacrificing themselves in the name of rebellion. In later texts, female heroes survive their "lighting out" experiences to explore diverse alternatives to the limiting roles that have circumscribed female development. This study of The Mountain Lion, Memories of a Catholic Girlhood, Coming of Age in Mississippi, Housekeeping, and Anywhere but Here identifies transformations of the quest-romance that support a viable theory of female development and offer literary patterns that challenge the male monopoly on transformative knowledge and heroic action.