Women Educators Leaders And Activists

Author: T. Fitzgerald
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137303522
Size: 36.46 MB
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Women Educators Leaders And Activists from the Author: T. Fitzgerald. This collection traces women educators' professional lives and the extent to which they challenged the gendered terrain they occupied. The emphasis is placed on women's historical public voices and their own interpretation of their 'selves' and 'lives' in their struggle to exercise authority in education.

African American Women Educators

Author: Karen A. Johnson
Publisher: R&L Education
ISBN: 161048648X
Size: 32.11 MB
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African American Women Educators from the Author: Karen A. Johnson. This book examines the lived experiences and work of African American women educators during the 1880s to the 1960s. Specifically, this text portrays an array of Black educators who used their social location as educators and activists to resist and fight the interlocking structures of power, oppression, and privilege that existed across the various educational institutions in the U.S. during this time. This book seeks to explore these educators' thoughts and teaching practices in an attempt to understand their unique vision of education for Black students and the implications of their work for current educational reform.

Education Identity And Women Religious 1800 1950

Author: Deirdre Raftery
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317410955
Size: 21.28 MB
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Education Identity And Women Religious 1800 1950 from the Author: Deirdre Raftery. This book brings together the work of eleven leading international scholars to map the contribution of teaching Sisters, who provided schooling to hundreds of thousands of children, globally, from 1800 to 1950. The volume represents research that draws on several theoretical approaches and methodologies. It engages with feminist discourses, social history, oral history, visual culture, post-colonial studies and the concept of transnationalism, to provide new insights into the work of Sisters in education. Making a unique contribution to the field, chapters offer an interrogation of historical sources as well as fresh interpretations of findings, challenging assumptions. Compelling narratives from the USA, Canada, New Zealand, Africa, Australia, South East Asia, France, the UK, Italy and Ireland contribute to what is a most important exploration of the contribution of the women religious by mapping and contextualizing their work. Education, Identity and Women Religious, 1800–1950: Convents, classrooms and colleges will appeal to academics, researchers and postgraduate students in the fields of social history, women’s history, the history of education, Catholic education, gender studies and international education.

Activist Educators

Author: Catherine Marshall
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135910448
Size: 41.51 MB
Format: PDF
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Activist Educators from the Author: Catherine Marshall. Taking an active stand in today's conservative educational climate can be a risky business. Given both the expectations of the profession and the challenge of participation in social justice activism, how do educator activists manage the often competing demands of professional and activist commitments? Activist Educators offers a view into the big picture of assertive idealistic professionals’ lives by presenting rich qualitative data on the impetus behind educators’ activism and the strategies they used to push limits in fighting for a cause. Chapters follow the stories of educator activists as they take on problems in schools, including sexual harassment, sexism, racism, reproductive rights, and GLBT rights. The research in Activist Educators contributes to an understanding of professional and personal motivations for educators’ activism, ultimately offering a significant contribution to aspiring teachers who need to know that education careers and social justice activist causes need not be mutually exclusive pursuits.

Community Activism And Feminist Politics

Author: Nancy Naples
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136049665
Size: 56.66 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Community Activism And Feminist Politics from the Author: Nancy Naples. This collection demonstrates the diversity of women's struggles against problems such as racism, violence, homophobia, focusing on the complex ways that gender, culture, race-ethnicity and class shape women's political consciousness in the US.

Women Leadership And Mosques

Author: Masooda Bano
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004209360
Size: 51.61 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Women Leadership And Mosques from the Author: Masooda Bano. This volume is the first to bring together analysis of contemporary female religious leadership in ideologically-diverse Muslim communities in the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and North America, with chapters discussing the emergence, consolidation, and impact of female Islamic authority.

A Forgotten Sisterhood

Author: Audrey Thomas McCluskey
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442211407
Size: 33.44 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A Forgotten Sisterhood from the Author: Audrey Thomas McCluskey. Emerging from the darkness of the slave era and Reconstruction, black activist women Lucy Craft Laney, Mary McLeod Bethune, Charlotte Hawkins Brown, and Nannie Helen Burroughs founded schools aimed at liberating African-American youth from disadvantaged futures in the segregated and decidedly unequal South. From the late nineteenth through mid-twentieth centuries, these individuals fought discrimination as members of a larger movement of black women who uplifted future generations through a focus on education, social service, and cultural transformation. Born free, but with the shadow of the slave past still implanted in their consciousness, Laney, Bethune, Brown, and Burroughs built off each other’s successes and learned from each other’s struggles as administrators, lecturers, and suffragists. Drawing from the women’s own letters and writings about educational methods and from remembrances of surviving students, Audrey Thomas McCluskey reveals the pivotal significance of this sisterhood’s legacy for later generations and for the institution of education itself.

Still Lifting Still Climbing

Author: Kimberly Springer
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814781241
Size: 38.87 MB
Format: PDF
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Still Lifting Still Climbing from the Author: Kimberly Springer. Still Lifting, Still Climbing is the first volume of its kind to document African American women's activism in the wake of the civil rights movement. Covering grassroots and national movements alike, contributors explore black women's mobilization around such areas as the black nationalist movements, the Million Man March, black feminism, anti-rape movements, mass incarceration, the U.S. Congress, welfare rights, health care, and labor organizing. Detailing the impact of post-1960s African American women's activism, they provide a much-needed update to the historical narrative. Ideal for course use, the volume includes original essays as well as primary source documents such as first-hand accounts of activism and statements of purpose. Each contributor carefully situates their topic within its historical framework, providing an accessible context for those unfamiliar with black women's history, and demonstrating that African American women's political agency does not emerge from a vacuum, but is part of a complex system of institutions, economics, and personal beliefs. This ambitious volume will be an invaluable resource on the state of contemporary African American women's activism.

Southern Women At The Seven Sister Colleges

Author: Joan Marie Johnson
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820334685
Size: 14.99 MB
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Southern Women At The Seven Sister Colleges from the Author: Joan Marie Johnson. From the end of Reconstruction and into the New South era, more than one thousand white southern women attended one of the Seven Sister colleges: Vassar, Wellesley, Smith, Mount Holyoke, Bryn Mawr, Radcliffe, and Barnard. Joan Marie Johnson looks at how such educations—in the North, at some of the country’s best schools—influenced southern women to challenge their traditional gender roles and become active in woman suffrage and other social reforms of the Progressive Era South. Attending one of the Seven Sister colleges, Johnson argues, could transform a southern woman indoctrinated in notions of domesticity and dependence into someone with newfound confidence and leadership skills. Many southern students at northern schools imported the values they imbibed at college, returning home to found schools of their own, women’s clubs, and woman suffrage associations. At the same time, during college and after graduation, southern women maintained a complicated relationship to home, nurturing their regional identity and remaining loyal to the ideals of the Confederacy. Johnson explores why students sought a classical liberal arts education, how they prepared for entrance examinations, and how they felt as southerners on northern campuses. She draws on personal writings, information gleaned from college publications and records, and data on the women’s decisions about marriage, work, children, and other life-altering concerns. In their time, the women studied in this book would eventually make up a disproportionately high percentage of the elite southern female leadership. This collective biography highlights the important part they played in forging new roles for women, especially in social reform, education, and suffrage.