Women And Gender In The American West

Author: Mary Ann Irwin
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826335999
Size: 77.70 MB
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Women And Gender In The American West from the Author: Mary Ann Irwin. In 1990 the Coalition for Western Women's History inaugurated the Joan Jensen-Darlis Miller Prize to recognize outstanding scholarship on gender and the experiences of women in the North American West. Since then, the Jensen-Miller Prize committees have considered nearly two hundred submissions, and chosen thirteen for the skill and imagination with which the authors conducted research in original materials or reinterpreted a major problem in the field. Each piece was done with grace and style, and shaped the field for future historians. Women and Gender in the American Westcollects these essays for the first time on topics that range from Mormon plural marriages to women's experiences in Spanish Borderland slavery, from interracial marriage to the sexual exploitation of Indian women in British Columbia, from Navajo women weavers in the market economy to women's reform work in gold rush era San Francisco, from settler women in western Canada to Chicana activists in Texas. Beyond their topical interest, the essays also present the evolving analytical force of a field that has deepened and matured over time. Professors Jensen's and Miller's classic 1980 essay "The Gentle Tamers Revisited" is reprinted here along with a new Preface in which Jensen and Miller reflect on the course of scholarship as reflected in these essays.Women and Gender in the American Westis a rare compilation of cutting-edge history. Royalties from sales ofWomen and Gender in the American Westgo to the Jensen-Miller Prize Fund of the Coalition for Western Women's History.

Wrangling Women

Author: Kristin M. McAndrews
Publisher: University of Nevada Press
ISBN: 9780874177589
Size: 79.53 MB
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Wrangling Women from the Author: Kristin M. McAndrews. A unique look at a mountain community of women in Winthrop, Washington who run a western-theme town and work as ranchers, trail guides, horse trainers and packers.

Landscapes Of The New West

Author: Krista Comer
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9780807848135
Size: 68.72 MB
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Landscapes Of The New West from the Author: Krista Comer. In the early 1970s, empowered by the civil rights and women's movements, a new group of women writers began speaking to the American public. Their topic, broadly defined, was the postmodern American West. By the mid-1980s, their combined works made for a bona fide literary groundswell in both critical and commercial terms. However, as Krista Comer notes, despite the attentions of publishers, the media, and millions of readers, literary scholars have rarely addressed this movement or its writers. Too many critics, Comer argues, still enamored of western images that are both masculine and antimodern, have been slow to reckon with the emergence of a new, far more "feminine," postmodern, multiracial, and urban west. Here, she calls for a redesign of the field of western cultural studies, one that engages issues of gender and race and is more self-conscious about space itself_especially that cherished symbol of western "authenticity," open landscape. Surveying works by Joan Didion, Wanda Coleman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Leslie Marmon Silko, Barbara Kingsolver, Pam Houston, Louise Erdrich, Sandra Cisneros, and Mary Clearman Blew, Comer shows how these and other contemporary women writers have mapped new geographical imaginations upon the cultural and social spaces of today's American West.

Mining Coal And Undermining Gender

Author: Jessica Smith Rolston
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813563690
Size: 28.43 MB
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Mining Coal And Undermining Gender from the Author: Jessica Smith Rolston. Though mining is an infamously masculine industry, women make up 20 percent of all production crews in Wyoming’s Powder River Basin—the largest coal-producing region in the United States. How do these women fit into a working culture supposedly hostile to females? This is what anthropologist Jessica Smith Rolston, herself a onetime mine worker and the daughter of a miner, set out to discover. Her answers, based on years of participant-observation in four mines and extensive interviews with miners, managers, engineers, and the families of mine employees, offer a rich and surprising view of the working “families” that miners construct. In this picture, gender roles are not nearly as straightforward—or as straitened—as stereotypes suggest. Gender is far from the primary concern of coworkers in crews. Far more important, Rolston finds, is protecting the safety of the entire crew and finding a way to treat each other well despite the stresses of their jobs. These miners share the burden of rotating shift work—continually switching between twelve-hour day and night shifts—which deprives them of the daily rhythms of a typical home, from morning breakfasts to bedtime stories. Rolston identifies the mine workers’ response to these shared challenges as a new sort of constructed kinship that both challenges and reproduces gender roles in their everyday working and family lives. Crews’ expectations for coworkers to treat one another like family and to adopt an “agricultural” work ethic tend to minimize gender differences. And yet, these differences remain tenacious in the equation of masculinity with technical expertise, and of femininity with household responsibilities. For Rolston, such lingering areas of inequality highlight the importance of structural constraints that flout a common impulse among men and women to neutralize the significance of gender, at home and in the workplace. At a time when the Appalachian region continues to dominate discussion of mining culture, this book provides a very different and unexpected view—of how miners live and work together, and of how their lives and work reconfigure ideas of gender and kinship.

Women In The American West

Author: Laura Woodworth-Ney
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1598840509
Size: 64.72 MB
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Women In The American West from the Author: Laura Woodworth-Ney. Examines the part that women played in the settlement of the American West, discussing their accomplishments as ranchers, soldiers, businesswomen, and politicians, and analyzing the influence that polygamy and prostitution had on the expansion into Western territories.

The American West

Author: Gordon Morris Bakken
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780815334620
Size: 31.72 MB
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The American West from the Author: Gordon Morris Bakken. Rethinking the significance of the West in American culture, this collection summaizes the debate and brings together materials from disparate sources.

Portraits Of Women In The American West

Author: Dee Garceau-Hagen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136076107
Size: 33.72 MB
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Portraits Of Women In The American West from the Author: Dee Garceau-Hagen. Men are usually the heroes of Western stories, but women also played a crucial role in developing the American frontier, and their stories have rarely been told. This anthology of biographical essays on women promises new insight into gender in the 19C American West. The women featured include Asian Americans, African-Americans and Native American women, as well as their white counterparts. The original essays offer observations about gender and sexual violence, the subordinate status of women of color, their perseverance and influence in changing that status, a look at the gendered religious legacy that shaped Western Catholicism, and women in the urban and rural, industrial and agricultural West.

Making Home Work

Author: Jane E. Simonsen
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807877265
Size: 31.90 MB
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Making Home Work from the Author: Jane E. Simonsen. During the westward expansion of America, white middle-class ideals of home and domestic work were used to measure differences between white and Native American women. Yet the vision of America as "home" was more than a metaphor for women's stake in the process of conquest--it took deliberate work to create and uphold. Treating white and indigenous women's struggles as part of the same history, Jane E. Simonsen argues that as both cultural workers and domestic laborers insisted upon the value of their work to "civilization," they exposed the inequalities integral to both the nation and the household. Simonsen illuminates discussions about the value of women's work through analysis of texts and images created by writers, women's rights activists, reformers, anthropologists, photographers, field matrons, and Native American women. She argues that women such as Caroline Soule, Alice Fletcher, E. Jane Gay, Anna Dawson Wilde, and Angel DeCora called upon the rhetoric of sentimental domesticity, ethnographic science, public display, and indigenous knowledge as they sought to make the gendered and racial order of the nation visible through homes and the work performed in them. Focusing on the range of materials through which domesticity was produced in the West, Simonsen integrates new voices into the study of domesticity's imperial manifestations.

Women Writers Of The American West 1833 1927

Author: Nina Baym
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252078845
Size: 10.43 MB
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Women Writers Of The American West 1833 1927 from the Author: Nina Baym. Women Writers of the American West, 1833-1927 recovers the names and works of hundreds of women who wrote about the American West during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, some of them long forgotten and others better known novelists, poets, memoirists, and historians such as Willa Cather and Mary Austin Holley. Nina Baym mined literary and cultural histories, anthologies, scholarly essays, catalogs, advertisements, and online resources to debunk critical assumptions that women did not publish about the West as much as they did about other regions. Elucidating a substantial body of nearly 650 books of all kinds by more than 300 writers, Baym reveals how the authors showed women making lives for themselves in the West, how they represented the diverse region, and how they represented themselves. Baym accounts for a wide range of genres and geographies, affirming that the literature of the West was always more than cowboy tales and dime novels. Nor did the West consist of a single landscape, as women living in the expanses of Texas saw a different world from that seen by women in gold rush California. Although many women writers of the American West accepted domestic agendas crucial to the development of families, farms, and businesses, they also found ways to be forceful agents of change, whether by taking on political positions, deriding male arrogance, or, as their voluminous published works show, speaking out when they were expected to be silent. Nina Baym is a professor emeritus of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The general editor of The Norton Anthology of American Literature, she has written several books on nineteenth-century women writers, beginning with Woman's Fiction: A Guide to Novels by and about Women in America, 1820-70.

Laboring Women

Author: Jennifer L. Morgan
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812206371
Size: 30.80 MB
Format: PDF
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Laboring Women from the Author: Jennifer L. Morgan. When black women were brought from Africa to the New World as slave laborers, their value was determined by their ability to work as well as their potential to bear children, who by law would become the enslaved property of the mother's master. In Laboring Women: Reproduction and Gender in New World Slavery, Jennifer L. Morgan examines for the first time how African women's labor in both senses became intertwined in the English colonies. Beginning with the ideological foundations of racial slavery in early modern Europe, Laboring Women traverses the Atlantic, exploring the social and cultural lives of women in West Africa, slaveowners' expectations for reproductive labor, and women's lives as workers and mothers under colonial slavery. Challenging conventional wisdom, Morgan reveals how expectations regarding gender and reproduction were central to racial ideologies, the organization of slave labor, and the nature of slave community and resistance. Taking into consideration the heritage of Africans prior to enslavement and the cultural logic of values and practices recreated under the duress of slavery, she examines how women's gender identity was defined by their shared experiences as agricultural laborers and mothers, and shows how, given these distinctions, their situation differed considerably from that of enslaved men. Telling her story through the arc of African women's actual lives—from West Africa, to the experience of the Middle Passage, to life on the plantations—she offers a thoughtful look at the ways women's reproductive experience shaped their roles in communities and helped them resist some of the more egregious effects of slave life. Presenting a highly original, theoretically grounded view of reproduction and labor as the twin pillars of female exploitation in slavery, Laboring Women is a distinctive contribution to the literature of slavery and the history of women.