We Are What We Sell How Advertising Shapes American Life And Always Has 3 Volumes

Author: Danielle Sarver Coombs
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313392455
Size: 61.19 MB
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We Are What We Sell How Advertising Shapes American Life And Always Has 3 Volumes from the Author: Danielle Sarver Coombs. For the last 150 years, advertising has created a consumer culture in the United States, shaping every facet of American life—from what we eat and drink to the clothes we wear and the cars we drive. • Includes original essays by noted cultural and advertising historians, commentators, and journalists • Provides analysis from experts in advertising and popular culture that places American advertising in historical and cultural context • Supplies a comprehensive examination of advertising history and its consequences across modern America • Presents an extensive analysis of the role of new media and the Internet • Documents why advertising is necessary, not only for companies, but in determining what being "an American" constitutes

Anti Intellectualism In American Life

Author: Richard Hofstadter
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307809676
Size: 70.31 MB
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Anti Intellectualism In American Life from the Author: Richard Hofstadter. Winner of the 1964 Pulitzer Prize in Non-Fiction. In this award-winning classic work of consensus history, Richard Hofstadter, author of The Age of Reform, examines the role of social movements in the perception of intellect in American life. "As Mr. Hofstadter unfolds the fascinating story, it is no crude battle of eggheads and fatheads. It is a rich, complex, shifting picture of the life of the mind in a society dominated by the ideal of practical success." --Robert Peel in the Christian Science Monitor

The Evangelicals

Author: Frances FitzGerald
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439143153
Size: 74.92 MB
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The Evangelicals from the Author: Frances FitzGerald. “A page turner…We have long needed a fair-minded overview of this vitally important religious sensibility, and FitzGerald has now provided it.” —The New York Times Book Review “Massively learned and electrifying…magisterial.” —The Christian Science Monitor This groundbreaking book from Pulitzer Prize­–winning historian Frances FitzGerald is the first to tell the powerful, dramatic story of the Evangelical movement in America—from the Puritan era to the 2016 presidential election. The evangelical movement began in the revivals of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, known in America as the Great Awakenings. A populist rebellion against the established churches, it became the dominant religious force in the country. During the nineteenth century white evangelicals split apart dramatically, first North versus South, and then at the end of the century, modernist versus fundamentalist. After World War II, Billy Graham, the revivalist preacher, attracted enormous crowds and tried to gather all Protestants under his big tent, but the civil rights movement and the social revolution of the sixties drove them apart again. By the 1980s Jerry Falwell and other southern televangelists, such as Pat Robertson, had formed the Christian right. Protesting abortion and gay rights, they led the South into the Republican Party, and for thirty-five years they were the sole voice of evangelicals to be heard nationally. Eventually a younger generation of leaders protested the Christian right’s close ties with the Republican Party and proposed a broader agenda of issues, such as climate change, gender equality, and immigration reform. Evangelicals have in many ways defined the nation. They have shaped our culture and our politics. Frances FitGerald’s narrative of this distinctively American movement is a major work of history, piecing together the centuries-long story for the first time. Evangelicals now constitute twenty-five percent of the American population, but they are no longer monolithic in their politics. They range from Tea Party supporters to social reformers. Still, with the decline of religious faith generally, FitzGerald suggests that evangelical churches must embrace ethnic minorities if they are to survive.

Fast Food Nation

Author: Eric Schlosser
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780395977897
Size: 43.29 MB
Format: PDF
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Fast Food Nation from the Author: Eric Schlosser. A journalist explores the homogenization of American culture and the impact of the fast food industry on modern-day health, economy, politics, popular culture, entertainment, and food production.

Advertising As Culture

Author: Chris Wharton
Publisher: Intellect Books
ISBN: 1841506141
Size: 40.94 MB
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Advertising As Culture from the Author: Chris Wharton. Penned by contributors from a range of disciplines, including art history, sociology, and media and cultural studies, this title explores such topics as the conceptual relationship between advertising and culture; the relationship of advertising to cultural fields such as art, fashion, and music; and developments in digital media practice.

Mediating The Message In The 21st Century

Author: Pamela J. Shoemaker
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135858284
Size: 70.93 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Mediating The Message In The 21st Century from the Author: Pamela J. Shoemaker. Hailed as one of the "most significant books of the twentieth century" by Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, Mediating the Message has long been an essential text for media effects scholars and students of media sociology. This new edition of the classic media sociology textbook now offers students a comprehensive, theoretical approach to media content in the twenty-first century, with an added focus on entertainment media and the Internet.

The Man Who Sold America

Author: Jeffrey L. Cruikshank
Publisher: Harvard Business Press
ISBN: 1422161773
Size: 21.56 MB
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The Man Who Sold America from the Author: Jeffrey L. Cruikshank. We live in an age of persuasion. Leaders and institutions of every kind--public and private, large and small--must compete in the marketplace of images and messages. This has been true since the advent of mass media, from broad circulation magazines and radio through the age of television and the internet. Yet there have been very few true geniuses at the art of mass persuasion in the last century. In public relations, Edward Bernays comes to mind. In advertising, most Hall-of-Famers--J. Walter Thomson, David Ogilvy, Bill Bernbach, Bruce Barton, Ray Rubicam, and others--point to one individual as the "father" of modern advertising: Albert D. Lasker. And yet Lasker--unlike Bernays, Thomson, Ogilvy, and the others--remains an enigma. Now, Jeffrey Cruikshank and Arthur Schultz, having uncovered a treasure trove of Lasker's papers, have written a fascinating and revealing biography of one of the 20th century's most powerful, intriguing, and instructive figures. It is no exaggeration to say that Lasker created modern advertising. He was the first influential proponent of "reason why" advertising, a consumer-centered approach that skillfully melded form and content and a precursor to the "unique selling proposition" approach that today dominates the industry. More than that, he was a prominent political figure, champion of civil rights, man of extreme wealth and hobnobber with kings and maharajahs, as well as with the likes of Albert Einstein and Eleanor Roosevelt. He was also a deeply troubled man, who suffered mental collapses throughout his adult life, though was able fight through and continue his amazing creative and productive activities into later life. This is the story of a man who shaped an industry, and in many ways, shaped a century.

Ten Restaurants That Changed America

Author: Paul Freedman
Publisher: Liveright Publishing
ISBN: 1631492462
Size: 74.12 MB
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Ten Restaurants That Changed America from the Author: Paul Freedman. From Delmonico’s to Sylvia’s to Chez Panisse, a daring and original history of dining out in America as told through ten legendary restaurants. Combining a historian’s rigor with a foodie ’s palate, Ten Restaurants That Changed America reveals how the history of our restaurants reflects nothing less than the history of America itself. Whether charting the rise of our love affair with Chinese food through San Francisco’s fabled The Mandarin, evoking the richness of Italian food through Mamma Leone’s, or chronicling the rise and fall of French haute cuisine through Henri Soulé’s Le Pavillon, food historian Paul Freedman uses each restaurant to tell a wider story of race and class, immigration and assimilation. Freedman also treats us to a scintillating history of the then-revolutionary Schrafft’s, a chain of convivial lunch spots that catered to women, and that bygone favorite, Howard Johnson’s, which pioneered midcentury, on-the-road dining, only to be swept aside by McDonald's. Lavishly designed with more than 100 photographs and images, including original menus, Ten Restaurants That Changed America is a significant and highly entertaining social history.