Crc Handbook Of Census Methods For Terrestrial Vertebrates

Author: Davis
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 9780849329708
Size: 27.12 MB
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Crc Handbook Of Census Methods For Terrestrial Vertebrates from the Author: Davis. Learn how to start a census program for terrestrial vertebrates with this handbook. Whether the information you need is for managing a population, surveying environmental impact, or conducting research on a particular species, this handbook has it all. Principles, methods, and calculations are explained. The following information is given for each species: name; range; reasons for census; life history; items of importance, e.g., migration; methods of census; recent and pertinent references; and comments about the various methods. CONTENTS: Introduction. Methods for Species: Amphibians and Reptiles. Methods for Species: Birds. Methods for Species: Mammals. Various Species in a Habitat. Index.

Traplines

Author: John Rember
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307548228
Size: 55.76 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Traplines from the Author: John Rember. In 1987, John Rember returned home to Sawtooth Valley, where he had been brought up. He returned out of a homing instinct: the same forty acres that had sustained his family’s horses had sustained a vision of a place where he belonged in the world, a life where he could get up in the morning, step out the door, and catch dinner from the Salmon River. But to his surprise, he found that what was once familiar was now unfamiliar. Everything might have looked the same to the horses that spring, but to Rember this was no longer home. In Traplines, Rember recounts his experiences of growing up in a time when the fish were wild in the rivers, horses were brought into the valley each spring from their winter pasture, and electric light still seemed magical. Today those same experiences no longer seem to possess the authenticity they once did. In his journey home, Rember discovers how the West, both as a place in which to live and as a terrain of the imagination, has been transformed. And he wonders whether his recollections of what once was prevent him from understanding his past and appreciating what he found when he returned home. In Traplines, Rember excavates the hidden desires that color memory and shows us how, once revealed, they can allow us to understand anew the stories we tell ourselves.

Foundation Papers In Landscape Ecology

Author: John A. Wiens
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231126809
Size: 67.71 MB
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Foundation Papers In Landscape Ecology from the Author: John A. Wiens. Landscape ecology focuses on spatial heterogeneity, or the idea that where things are and where they are in relation to other things can have important consequences for a wide range of phenomena. Landscape ecology integrates humans with natural ecosystems and brings a spatial perspective to such fields as natural resource management, conservation, and urban planning. The thirty-seven papers included in this volume present the origins and development of landscape ecology and encompass a variety of perspectives, approaches, and geographies. The editors begin with articles that illuminate the discipline's diverse scientific foundations, such as L. S. Berg's keystone paper outlining a geoecological analysis based on soil science, physical geography, and geology. Next they include selections exemplifying landscape ecologists' growing awareness of spatial pattern, the different ways they incorporated scale into their work, the progression of landscape ecology from a qualitative to a quantitative discipline, and how concepts from landscape ecology have come to permeate ecological research and influence land-use policy, conservation practices, landscape architecture, and geography. Together these articles provide a solid introduction to what is now widely recognized as an important area of research and application that encourages new ways of thinking about natural and human-dominated ecosystems

Red River Raging

Author: Thelma Poirier
Publisher: Coteau Books
ISBN: 1550504924
Size: 28.87 MB
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Red River Raging from the Author: Thelma Poirier. In poetry that is spare, strong, and unsentimental, she describes the rancher’s life, a life lived on the land where work is hard and weather matters, a life that changes as the seasons change, a life of fixing fence and hunting strays, of round-ups and branding and shipping cattle to market, but also a life made memorable by the beauty of landscape and sky, of birds and beasts. The section “New Orleans, Saskatchewan” adds an exotic touch as, on the strains of a mother’s bluesy music, readers are carried south from the Great Plains to Louisiana. In “The January File”, it’s the threat of the Gulf War that throws its foreboding shadow over ranch country. Finally in “Call This Place Home”, a section that reprises many of the currents flowing through the book, the narrator admits that it`s time to leave the ranch and the live she loved and longs for. Thelma Poirier’s very spirit shares the fragility of the grasslands ecosystem and all its creatures, great and small.

Traplines

Author: Eden Robinson
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 1497662788
Size: 27.77 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Traplines from the Author: Eden Robinson. From a writer whom the New York Times dubbed Canada’s “Generation X laureate” comes a quartet of haunting, unforgettable tales of young people stuck in the inescapable prison of family A New York Times Notable Book and winner of Britain’s prestigious Winifred Holtby Memorial Prize, Traplines is the book that introduced the world to Canadian author Eden Robinson. In three stories and a novella, Robinson explodes the idea of family as a nurturing safe haven through a progression of domestic horrors experienced by her young, often helpless protagonists. With her mesmerizing, dark skill, the author ushers us into these worlds of violence and abuse, where family loyalty sometimes means turning a blind eye to murder, and survival itself can be viewed as an act of betrayal. In the title story, for a teenager named Will growing up on a Native reserve in northwestern Canada, guilt, race, and blind fidelity are the shackles chaining him to the everyday cruelty and abuse he is forced to endure. In “Dogs in Winter,” a girl recalls life with her serial-killer mother and fears for her own future. A young teen and the sadistic, psychopathic cousin who comes to live with him engage in a cat-and-mouse game that soon escalates out of control in “Contact Sports,” while in the final story, “Queen of the North,” a young Native girl deals in her own way with sexual molestation at the hands of a pedophile uncle. Each of these tales is vivid, intense, and disturbing, and Robinson renders them unforgettable with her deft flair for storytelling and a surprising touch of humor.

Mammalian Diversification

Author: James L. Patton
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520098534
Size: 41.40 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Mammalian Diversification from the Author: James L. Patton. Fourteen chapters by colleagues and former students celebrating the career of James L. Patton, the emeritus curator of mammals at the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology. All the papers deal with mammalian evolution.

Trap Lines North

Author: Stephen Warren Meader
Publisher: Southern Skies Publishing
ISBN: 9781931177061
Size: 79.40 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Trap Lines North from the Author: Stephen Warren Meader.

Around The Sacred Fire

Author: J. Treat
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137051752
Size: 14.77 MB
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Around The Sacred Fire from the Author: J. Treat. Around the Sacred Fire is a compelling cultural history of intertribal activism centered on the Indian Ecumenical Conference, an influential movement among native people in Canada and the U.S. during the Red Power era. Founded in 1969, the Conference began as an attempt at organizing grassroots spiritual leaders who were concerned about the conflict between tribal and Christian traditions throughout Indian country. By the mid-seventies thousands of people were gathering each summer in the foothills of the Rockies, where they participated in weeklong encampments promoting spiritual revitalization and religious self-determination. Most historical overviews of native affairs in the sixties and seventies emphasize the prominence of the American Indian Movement and the impact of highly publicized confrontations such as the Northwest Coast fish-ins, the Alcatraz occupation, and events at Wounded Knee. The Indian Ecumenical Conference played a central role in stimulating cultural revival among native people, partly because Conference leaders strategized for social change in ways that differed from the militant groups. Drawing on archival records, published accounts, oral histories, and field research, James Treat has written the first comprehensive study of this important but overlooked effort at postcolonial interreligious dialogue.