Traditions And Continuities

Author: Ragnar Ingi Adalsteinsson
Publisher: University of Iceland Press
ISBN: 9935230368
Size: 28.15 MB
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Traditions And Continuities from the Author: Ragnar Ingi Adalsteinsson. Traditions and Continuities - Alliteration in Old and Modern Icelandic Verse, is a lucid and authorative treatment of Old Icelandic alliterative metre, and of the subtle changes it underwent as the language evolved into later and modern Icelandic. It falls into four sections, beginning with an exhaustive account of the mechanics of alliteration and their development up until the present; a review of the development of research into the subject; the author's own research into the nature of alliterative verse, with special attention to complex phenomena such as vowel alliteration, s-clusters an hv-alliteration; and final section summarizing the main conclusions. Written by a scholar and poet, this is an essential handbook for the English-speaking research student in the subject.

Sons Of The Buddha

Author: Jason A. Carbine
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter
ISBN: 3110254107
Size: 23.69 MB
Format: PDF
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Sons Of The Buddha from the Author: Jason A. Carbine. Intended as a contribution to the study of religion and society, this book examines Buddhist monasticism in Myanmar. The book focuses on the Shwegyin, one of the most important but least understood monastic groups in the country. It illuminates key aspects of monastic and wider Burmese Buddhist thought and practice, and ultimately argues for the distinctiveness of elements of that thought and practice in comparison to the Buddhist cultures of Sri Lanka and Laos.

Language And Tradition In Ireland

Author: Maria Tymoczko
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 9781558494275
Size: 80.30 MB
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Language And Tradition In Ireland from the Author: Maria Tymoczko. If language and culture are intimately connected, then cultures involving people who speak more than one language must have special characteristics, as well as particular social issues to negotiate. What are the challenges faced by a people with two or more languages as their heritage? How does that multiple heritage affect cultural forms, including literature and the arts? How does linguistic difference influence the conceptualization and writing of history? And if the meeting of languages within a people has involved contestation and power, how are those conflicts negotiated? This volume uses the tools of critical theory to explore such questions with respect to the complex, multilingual history of Ireland. Avoiding the simplistic polarized oppositions popular with cultural nationalists, the contributors examine the nexus of language, tradition, and authority in Ireland that has created such a rich, multivalent culture. Although the linguistic interface of Irish and English has dominated cultural negotiations in Ireland over the last five hundred years, the island has an even longer history of linguistic and cultural exchange. Arguing that tradition is never static, the essays in this volume challenge the concept of a monolithic cultural origin, while insisting on the importance of inherited discourses in the continuity of culture through time and across linguistic difference. The chapters cover a broad range of topics from early Irish narratives and Latin hagiography to literary works by such writers as Yeats, Joyce, Friel, Montague, and McGahern, as well as other cultural forms, including traditional Irish music. Several chapters address issues of politics and power, from the role of interpreters in the relations between linguistic communities in Ireland to the politicization of language in Northern Ireland since the 1980s. Taken together, the essays illuminate scholarly domains as varied as postcolonial theory, the relationship between language and nation, the nature of tradition, and Irish literature of all periods. In addition to the editors, contributors include Michael Cronin, Joanne Findon, Helen Fulton, Declan Kiberd, Jeremy Lowe, Gordon McCoy and Camille O'Reilly, Catherine McKenna, Cóilín Owens, Thomas Dillon Redshaw, and Sally K. Sommers Smith.

Donegal S Changing Traditions

Author: Eugenia Shanklin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134283172
Size: 12.12 MB
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Donegal S Changing Traditions from the Author: Eugenia Shanklin. First Published in 1985. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Traditioning Disciples

Author: Colleen Mary Mallon
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1608990885
Size: 33.34 MB
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Traditioning Disciples from the Author: Colleen Mary Mallon. In a globalized world and an "age that cannot name itself," how do Christian communities sustain a recognizable gospel identity? How might examining tradition and identity formation from both theology and cultural anthropology help churches approach the challenges of being a follower of Jesus today? With these questions in focus, Colleen Mallon studies symbol systems in the works of anthropologists Mary Douglas, Victor Turner, and Clifford Geertz and places her findings in dialogue with a "thick description" of discipleship gleaned from the great Roman Catholic ecclesiologist Yves Congar, OP. The result is a reflection on gospel identity that will be invaluable to Christian ministers, missioners, and students of theology interested in the social and theological processes of disciple formation.

Moral Progress

Author: Lisa Bellantoni
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780791444443
Size: 78.28 MB
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Moral Progress from the Author: Lisa Bellantoni. Argues that in order to reinvigorate our moral inheritances we must endeavor not only to live well, but also to live better.

The Church Made Strange For The Nations

Author: Paul G. Doerksen
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1630877220
Size: 11.16 MB
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The Church Made Strange For The Nations from the Author: Paul G. Doerksen. Christians have sometimes professed that the church ought to be "in the world but not of it," yet the meaning and significance of this conviction has continued to challenge and confound. In the context of persecution, Christians in the ancient world tended to distance themselves from the social and civic mainstream, while in the medieval and early modern periods, the church and secular authorities often worked in close relationship, sharing the role of shaping society. In a post-Christendom era, this latter arrangement has been heavily critiqued and largely dismantled, but there is no consensus in Christian thought as to what the alternative should be. The present collection of essays offers new perspectives on this subject matter, drawing on sometimes widely disparate interlocutors, ancient and modern, biblical and "secular." Readers will find these essays challenging and thought-provoking.

Singular Continuities

Author: George K. Behlmer
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804734899
Size: 72.30 MB
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Singular Continuities from the Author: George K. Behlmer. This volume explores the appropriation of the past in modern British culture. The twelve essays argue that to distinguish between "the new" and "the traditional" today often draws a false dichotomy. It argues that Britishness, in fact, has been the product of continuous creation throughout the 19th and 20th centuries.

Honoring Elders

Author: Michael D. McNally
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231518250
Size: 13.27 MB
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Honoring Elders from the Author: Michael D. McNally. Like many Native Americans, Ojibwe people esteem the wisdom, authority, and religious significance of old age, but this respect does not come easily or naturally. It is the fruit of hard work, rooted in narrative traditions, moral vision, and ritualized practices of decorum that are comparable in sophistication to those of Confucianism. Even as the dispossession and policies of assimilation have threatened Ojibwe peoplehood and have targeted the traditions and the elders who embody it, Ojibwe and other Anishinaabe communities have been resolute and resourceful in their disciplined respect for elders. Indeed, the challenges of colonization have served to accentuate eldership in new ways. Using archival and ethnographic research, Michael D. McNally follows the making of Ojibwe eldership, showing that deference to older women and men is part of a fuller moral, aesthetic, and cosmological vision connected to the ongoing circle of life& mdash;a tradition of authority that has been crucial to surviving colonization. McNally argues that the tradition of authority and the authority of tradition frame a decidedly indigenous dialectic, eluding analytic frameworks of invented tradition and naïve continuity. Demonstrating the rich possibilities of treating age as a category of analysis, McNally provocatively asserts that the elder belongs alongside the priest, prophet, sage, and other key figures in the study of religion.