The Hamilton Collection

Author: Dan Tucker
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0316503681
Size: 38.57 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Hamilton Collection from the Author: Dan Tucker. The subject of a New York Times best-selling biography and a Pulitzer-Prize winning musical, interest in Alexander Hamilton is at an all-time high. This carefully curated collection of Hamilton's writings gives the reader an intimate glimpse into the mind of our most misunderstood founding father. The smash-hit musical Hamilton presents its central character as a truth-telling immigrant boot-strapper who used his extraordinary intelligence to make good--but what was he really like? Let the man himself, a prolific and extremely effective writer, tell his story in his own words. Organized chronologically, this collection of Alexander Hamilton's personal letters, business and governmental correspondence, and excerpts from his most important published writings (including the Federalist Papers) gives readers first-hand insight into this highly influential founding father who engineered the ratification of the US Constitution, created the United States' financial system, and established friendly trade relations with Britain. The book includes love letters to Elizabeth Schuyler, who became his wife, and correspondence with his friend-turned-nemesis, Aaron Burr, which led to the duel in Weehawken that ended Hamilton's life at the age of 47. Also included are responses from some of his correspondents that give a 360-degree view of the man so esteemed by his protector and friend, George Washington, but reviled by others, including Washington's successor as president, John Adams. Illustrated with 50 illustrations, drawings, document facsimiles and more, the text is accompanied throughout by explanatory annotations from editor Dan Tucker who also provides introductions to each chapter and a preface. Dan Tucker is a writer and editor living in Brooklyn. He is the founder of Sideshow Media, a New York-based independent producer of books and digital content focused on history,the arts, pop culture, and travel.

Alexander Hamilton

Author: Joseph A. Murray
Publisher: Algora Publishing
ISBN: 0875865003
Size: 30.13 MB
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Alexander Hamilton from the Author: Joseph A. Murray. Alexander Hamilton: America's Forgotten Founder describes the character and achievements of a man who was instrumental in casting the form of our government and especially its strong financial structure. His financial innovations renewed the public credit when war debts threatened to swamp the fledgling economy, provided a stable currency system and established a federal revenue system. Hamilton s involvement in the foreign affairs of the new republic assured its unity, sovereignty and rapid economic growth.

Books On Early American History And Culture 1961 1970

Author: Raymond Irwin
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313314322
Size: 15.86 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Books On Early American History And Culture 1961 1970 from the Author: Raymond Irwin. Professors and students alike will appreciate this comprehensive collection of resources regarding American History and Culture between 1961-1970.

The Papers Of Alexander Hamilton

Author: Alexander Hamilton
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231089258
Size: 63.18 MB
Format: PDF
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The Papers Of Alexander Hamilton from the Author: Alexander Hamilton. Why do smokers claim that the first cigarette of the day is the best? What is the biological basis behind some heavy drinkers' belief that the "hair-of-the-dog" method alleviates the effects of a hangover? Why does marijuana seem to affect ones problem-solving capacity? Intoxicating Minds is, in the author's words, "a grand excavation of drug myth." Neither extolling nor condemning drug use, it is a story of scientific and artistic achievement, war and greed, empires and religions, and lessons for the future. Ciaran Regan looks at each class of drugs, describing the historical evolution of their use, explaining how they work within the brain's neurophysiology, and outlining the basic pharmacology of those substances. From a consideration of the effect of stimulants, such as caffeine and nicotine, and the reasons and consequences of their sudden popularity in the seventeenth century, the book moves to a discussion of more modern stimulants, such as cocaine and ecstasy. In addition, Regan explains how we process memory, the nature of thought disorders, and therapies for treating depression and schizophrenia. Regan then considers psychedelic drugs and their perceived mystical properties and traces the history of placebos to ancient civilizations. Finally, Intoxicating Minds considers the physical consequences of our co-evolution with drugs -- how they have altered our very being -- and offers a glimpse of the brave new world of drug therapies.

Founding Feuds

Author: Paul Aron
Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.
ISBN: 1492632317
Size: 11.32 MB
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Founding Feuds from the Author: Paul Aron. The Founding Fathers have been hailed for centuries as shining examples of men who put aside their own agendas to found a nation. But behind the scenes, there were more petty fights and fraught relationships than signatures on the Declaration of Independence. From the violent brawl between Roger Griswold and Matthew Lyon in the halls of Congress, to George Washington's battle against his slave Harry Washington, these less-discussed clashes bring to light the unpredictable and volatile nature of a constantly changing nation. Additionally, this gripping narrative delves deeper into the famous feuds, such as the fatal duel of Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, and the many rivalries of Thomas Jefferson (which were as often personal as political.) America's great forbearers fought with each other as bitterly as our politicians do today. Founding Feuds reveals the true natures of the Founding Fathers and how their infighting shaped our nation as much as their cooperation, in fact sometimes even for the better.

The American Revolution In The Law

Author: Shannon C. Stimson
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400861470
Size: 66.19 MB
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The American Revolution In The Law from the Author: Shannon C. Stimson. In 1773 John Adams observed that one source of tension in the debate between England and the colonies could be traced to the different conceptions each side had of the terms "legally" and "constitutionally"--different conceptions that were, as Shannon Stimson here demonstrates, symptomatic of deeper jurisprudential, political, and even epistemological differences between the two governmental outlooks. This study of the political and legal thought of the American revolution and founding period explores the differences between late eighteenth-century British and American perceptions of the judicial and jural power. In Stimson's book, which will interest both historians and theorists of law and politics, the study of colonial juries provides an incisive tool for organizing, interpreting, and evaluating various strands of American political theory, and for challenging the common assumption of a basic unity of vision of the roots of Anglo-American jurisprudence. The author introduces an original concept, that of "judicial space," to account for the development of the highly political role of the Supreme Court, a judicial body that has no clear counterpart in English jurisprudence. Originally published in 1990. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Triumvirate

Author: Bruce Chadwick
Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.
ISBN: 1402247702
Size: 57.96 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Triumvirate from the Author: Bruce Chadwick. From noted historian Bruce Chadwick—acclaimed as "a writer incapable of dull storytelling"—Triumvirate is the dramatic story of the uniting of a nation and the unlikely alliance at the heart of it all. When the smoke cleared from Revolutionary War battlefields, independent-minded Americans turned against each other. Strong individuals with wildly different personalities, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay joined forces to convince wary Americans and thirteen headstrong states to unite as one. Together they wrote the startlingly original Federalist Papers not as an exercise in governmental philosophy, but instead aimed at overcoming the common man's fears. Their relentless efforts laid the groundwork for ratifying the Constitution against rampant opposition. United by an intense love for their emerging nation, Hamilton, Madison, and Jay forged its legacy in pen and ink. "Dr. Chadwick tells an exciting story. His analysis will provoke further debate about this momentous period in American history." Dr. Paul Clemens, the Chairman of the Rutgers University Department of History PRAISE FOR TRIUMVIRATE "The author effectively details the fi erce debates in Massachusetts, Virginia, and New York and the serpentine political machinations that helped bring about the birth of a nation…Not just a history lesson, but an examination of the fundamental ideas that gave birth to the United States." Kirkus Reviews "Chadwick tells an exciting story…His analysis will provoke further debate about this momentous period in American history." Dr. Paul Clemens, Rutgers University "If you think you know how America's founding document came about, think again. In this remarkable new book, Bruce Chadwick reminds us of the three extraordinary men who worked state by state, individual by individual, to ensure passage of the Constitution. It's a fascinating tale, well told." Terry Golway, author of Washington's General and Ronald Reagan's America PRAISE FOR BRUCE CHADWICK "A writer incapable of dull storytelling." Kirkus Reviews "Chadwick vividly brings to life a time of turmoil and hope in a book that should endure as a fi ne example of historical journalism." Willard Sterne Randall, author of George Washington: A Life

Lost In The District Lost In The Federal Territory The Life And Times Of Doctor David Ross Surgeon Sot Weed Factor Importer Of Human Labor Of Bladensburg Maryland And Related Individuals

Author: Stewart Lillard
Publisher: Lulu.com
ISBN: 1483465810
Size: 20.38 MB
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Lost In The District Lost In The Federal Territory The Life And Times Of Doctor David Ross Surgeon Sot Weed Factor Importer Of Human Labor Of Bladensburg Maryland And Related Individuals from the Author: Stewart Lillard. "Lost in the District, Lost in the Federal Territory" relates the facts about Doctor David Ross of Bladensburg, his family life, his business and political connections, and his efforts to develop a productive iron mine along the upper Potomac River on lower Antietam Creek in Washington County, Maryland. Through his diligence and the skills of his close relatives, Dr. Ross was in a position to recommend the taking up of arms against Great Britain to his river neighbors of the Committee of Correspondence. His son was later appointed to serve briefly as one of the first auditors for the newly formed District of Columbia. His nephew by marriage, James Maccubbin Lingan, a victim of the Baltimore Riot of July 28, 1812, was one of the first group of leaders who set Georgetown, Maryland (and later D.C.), on its course to greatness as a deep water port. He remains the only veteran of the American Revolutionary War to be buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Guide To U S Economic Policy

Author: Robert E. Wright
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 1483386317
Size: 59.60 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Guide To U S Economic Policy from the Author: Robert E. Wright. Guide to U.S. Economic Policy shows students and researchers how issues and actions are translated into public policies for resolving economic problems (like the Great Recession) or managing economic conflict (like the left-right ideological split over the role of government regulation in markets). Taking an interdisciplinary approach, the guide highlights decision-making cycles requiring the cooperation of government, business, and an informed citizenry to achieve a comprehensive approach to a successful, growth-oriented economic policy. Through 30 topical, operational, and relational essays, the book addresses the development of U.S. economic policies from the colonial period to today; the federal agencies and public and private organizations that influence and administer economic policies; the challenges of balancing economic development with environmental and social goals; and the role of the U.S. in international organizations such as the IMF and WTO. Key Features: 30 essays by experts in the field investigate the fundamental economic, political, social, and process initiatives that drive policy decisions affecting the nation’s economic stability and success. Essential themes traced throughout the chapters include scarcity, wealth creation, theories of economic growth and macroeconomic management, controlling inflation and unemployment, poverty, the role of government agencies and regulations to police markets, Congress vs. the president, investment policies, economic indicators, the balance of trade, and the immediate and long-term costs associated with economic policy alternatives. A glossary of key economic terms and events, a summary of bureaus and agencies charged with economic policy decisions, a master bibliography, and a thorough index appear at the back of the book. This must-have reference for students and researchers is suitable for academic, public, high school, government, and professional libraries.

Politics Ethics And Change

Author: George R. Goethals
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing
ISBN: 1785368931
Size: 57.79 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Politics Ethics And Change from the Author: George R. Goethals. The impact of James MacGregor Burns’ writings on our understanding of moral and lasting change is explored through essays focussing on transforming leadership in contexts such as the founding of the American nation and presidential leadership throughout US history. Burns’s most influential concepts are explained, critiqued and expanded and then applied in political, business and institutional domains. The volume demonstrates how Burns’s analyses illuminate the nature of social change and transformation, the subtleties of the relationship between leaders and followers, and how together both can realize enduring human values using power resources that arouse and satisfy deep human motives.