The Origins Of American Politics

Author: Bernard Bailyn
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307798518
Size: 64.94 MB
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The Origins Of American Politics from the Author: Bernard Bailyn. "An astonishing range of reading in contemporary tracts and modern authorities is manifest, and many aspects of British and colonial affairs are illuminated. As a political analysis this very important contribution will be hard to refute...." —Frederick B. Tolles, Political Science Quarterly "He produces historical analysis which is as revealing to the political scientist or sociologist as to the historian, of the significance of social and cultural forces on political changes in eighteenth-century America." —John D. Lees, Cambridge University Press "...these well-argued essays represent the first sustained and systematic attempt to provide a comprehensive and integrated analysis of all elements of American political life during the late colonial period...the author has once again put all students concerned with colonial America heavily in his intellectual debt." —Jack P. Greene, The New York Historical Society Quarterly "...Mr. Bailyn brings to his effort a splendid gift for pertinent curiosity. What he has found, and what patterns he has made of his findings, light our way through his longitudes and latitudes of scholarly precision." —Charles Poore, The New York Times

The Origins Of American Social Science

Author: Dorothy Ross
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521428361
Size: 39.34 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The Origins Of American Social Science from the Author: Dorothy Ross. Focusing on the disciplines of economics, sociology, political science, and history, this book examines how American social science came to model itself on natural science and liberal politics. Professor Ross argues that American social science receives its distinctive stamp from the ideology of American exceptionalism, the idea that America occupies an exceptional place in history, based on her republican government and wide economic opportunity. Professor Ross shows how each of the social science disciplines, while developing their inherited intellectual traditions, responded to change in historical consciousness, political needs, professional structures, and the conceptions of science available to them. This is a comprehensive book, which looks broadly at American social science in its historical context and to demonstrate the central importance of the national ideology of American exceptionalism to the development of the social sciences and to American social thought generally.

American Government

Author: Cal Jillson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315388286
Size: 30.69 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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American Government from the Author: Cal Jillson. How politics in America works today, how it got that way, and how it’s likely to change through reform—these are the themes that pervade every chapter of Cal Jillson’s highly lauded American Government: Political Development and Institutional Change. America’s past is present in all aspects of the contemporary political system. Jillson uses political development and the dynamics of change as a thematic tool to help students understand how politics works now—and how institutions, participation, and policies have evolved over time to produce this political environment. In addition, Jillson helps students think critically about how American democracy might evolve further, focusing in every chapter on reform and further change. New to the Ninth Edition Highlights the 2016 Presidential and Congressional campaigns and elections. Projects the likely legacy of Barack Obama’s presidency. Includes important Supreme Court events and decisions including the death of Justice Antonin Scalia and the affirmation of gay marriage. Covers the continuing challenges of and to the Affordable Care Act. Presents new material on race, ethnicity, gender, and political participation. Explores growing income inequality and its implications. Pays increased attention to social media and new media in politics. Updates all data in tables and figures through the 2016 elections. Offers the most compact yet comprehensive text package available. Features of This Innovative Text Key Focus Questions at the beginning of every chapter prepare students for the major points to be covered. "The Constitution Today" chapter-opening vignettes illustrate the importance of conflicting views on constitutional principles. Key terms are defined in the margins on the page where they appear, helping students understand important concepts in context. Colorful figures and tables enable students to visualize important information. "Struggling towards Democracy" features provoke critical thinking through examining the "then and now" of democracy in America. "Let’s Compare" boxes analyze how functions of government and political participation work in other countries—now framed by new critical thinking questions. "Pro & Con" boxes bring to life a central debate in each chapter and highlight competing perspectives; new discussion questions in each box prompt students to consider the different arguments and weigh in. End-of-chapter summaries, suggested readings, and web resources help students master the material and guide them to further critical investigation of important concepts and topics.

The Origins Of Canadian And American Political Differences

Author: Jason Andrew Kaufman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674031364
Size: 67.72 MB
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The Origins Of Canadian And American Political Differences from the Author: Jason Andrew Kaufman. Why do the United States and Canada have such divergent political cultures when they share one of the closest economic and cultural relationships in the world? Kaufman examines the North American political landscape to draw out the essential historical factors that underlie the countries differences."

Framing American Politics

Author: Karen Callaghan and Frauke Schnell, eds.
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press
ISBN: 0822972727
Size: 24.34 MB
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Framing American Politics from the Author: Karen Callaghan and Frauke Schnell, eds.. Most issues in American political life are complex and multifaceted, subject to multiple interpretations and points of view. How issues are framed matters enormously for the way they are understood and debated. For example, is affirmative action a just means toward a diverse society, or is it reverse discrimination? Is the war on terror a defense of freedom and liberty, or is it an attack on privacy and other cherished constitutional rights? Bringing together some of the leading researchers in American politics, Framing American Politics explores the roles that interest groups, political elites, and the media play in framing political issues for the mass public. The contributors address some of the most hotly debated foreign and domestic policies in contemporary American life, focusing on both the origins and process of framing and its effects on citizens. In so doing, these scholars clearly demonstrate how frames can both enhance and hinder political participation and understanding.

Patriots Settlers And The Origins Of American Social Policy

Author: Laura Jensen
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521524261
Size: 63.25 MB
Format: PDF
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Patriots Settlers And The Origins Of American Social Policy from the Author: Laura Jensen. Patriots, Settlers, and the Origins of American Social Policy offers a pathbreaking account of the pivotal role played by entitlement policies during the first hundred years of the United States' existence. Contrary to the story of developmental delay contained in the standard historiography, Laura Jensen reveals that national social policies not only existed in early America, but also were a major instrument by which the fledgling US government built itself and the new nation. From 1776 onwards, Federal pensions and land entitlements figured prominently in the growth and empowerment of a unique American state, the consolidation and expansion of the country, and the political incorporation of a diverse citizenry. The book provides a rich account of how governing institutions, public expectations, ideas about law and legality, political necessity and public policy gave shape to definitions of need, worth, and eligibility in late eighteenth and nineteenth century America.

The Ideological Origins Of American Federalism

Author: Alison L. LaCroix
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674048867
Size: 22.56 MB
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The Ideological Origins Of American Federalism from the Author: Alison L. LaCroix. Federalism is regarded as one of the signal American contributions to modern politics. Its origins are typically traced to the drafting of the Constitution, but the story began decades before the delegates met in Philadelphia. In this groundbreaking book, Alison LaCroix traces the history of American federal thought from its colonial beginnings in scattered provincial responses to British assertions of authority, to its emergence in the late eighteenth century as a normative theory of multilayered government. The core of this new federal ideology was a belief that multiple independent levels of government could legitimately exist within a single polity, and that such an arrangement was not a defect but a virtue. This belief became a foundational principle and aspiration of the American political enterprise. LaCroix thus challenges the traditional account of republican ideology as the single dominant framework for eighteenth-century American political thought. Understanding the emerging federal ideology returns constitutional thought to the central place that it occupied for the founders. Federalism was not a necessary adaptation to make an already designed system work; it was the system. Connecting the colonial, revolutionary, founding, and early national periods in one story reveals the fundamental reconfigurations of legal and political power that accompanied the formation of the United States. The emergence of American federalism should be understood as a critical ideological development of the period, and this book is essential reading for everyone interested in the American story.

The Origins Of Canadian Politics

Author: Gordon T. Stewart
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 0774844892
Size: 49.54 MB
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The Origins Of Canadian Politics from the Author: Gordon T. Stewart. The conditions of colonial politics in Canada between 1760 and 1848 produced features that became permanent landmarks of post-Confederation Canadian politics -- sharp partisan battles, intense use of patronage, strong one-man dominance in party leadership, and a 'statist' orientation not only in government in Ottawa but also in Ontario and Quebec. In this compelling book Gordon Stewart deals with these topics in an original way by placing Canadian politics in a comparative context against the background of political and constitutional developments in England and America between 1688 and the 1820's.

The Origins Of American Religious Nationalism

Author: Sam Haselby
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190266503
Size: 70.48 MB
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The Origins Of American Religious Nationalism from the Author: Sam Haselby. Sam Haselby offers a new and persuasive account of the role of religion in the formation of American nationality, showing how a contest within Protestantism reshaped American political culture and led to the creation of an enduring religious nationalism. Following U.S. independence, the new republic faced vital challenges, including a vast and unique continental colonization project undertaken without, in the centuries-old European senses of the terms, either "a church" or "a state." Amid this crisis, two distinct Protestant movements arose: a popular and rambunctious frontier revivalism; and a nationalist, corporate missionary movement dominated by Northeastern elites. The former heralded the birth of popular American Protestantism, while the latter marked the advent of systematic Protestant missionary activity in the West. The explosive economic and territorial growth in the early American republic, and the complexity of its political life, gave both movements opportunities for innovation and influence. This book explores the competition between them in relation to major contemporary developments-political democratization, large-scale immigration and unruly migration, fears of political disintegration, the rise of American capitalism and American slavery, and the need to nationalize the frontier. Haselby traces these developments from before the American Revolution to the rise of Andrew Jackson. His approach illuminates important changes in American history, including the decline of religious distinctions and the rise of racial ones, how and why "Indian removal" happened when it did, and with Andrew Jackson, the appearance of the first full-blown expression of American religious nationalism.

Why Parties

Author: John H. Aldrich
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226012728
Size: 31.93 MB
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Why Parties from the Author: John H. Aldrich. Why did the United States develop political parties? How and why do party alignments change? Are the party-centered elections of the past better for democratic politics than the candidate-centered elections of the present? In this landmark book, John Aldrich goes beyond the clamor of arguments over whether American political parties are in resurgence or decline and undertakes a wholesale reexamination of the foundations of the American party system. Surveying three critical episodes in the development of American political parties—from their formation in the 1790s to the Civil War—Aldrich shows how parties serve to combat three fundamental problems of democracy: how to regulate the number of people seeking public office; how to mobilize voters; and how to achieve and maintain the majorities needed to accomplish goals once in office. Overcoming these obstacles, argues Aldrich, is possible only with political parties. Aldrich brings this innovative account up to date by looking at the profound changes in the character of political parties since World War II. In the 1960s, he shows, parties started to become candidate-centered organizations that are servants to their office seekers and officeholders. Aldrich argues that this development has revitalized parties, making them stronger, and more vital, with well-defined cleavages and highly effective governing ability.