About Town

Author: Ben Yagoda
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0684816059
Size: 53.16 MB
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About Town from the Author: Ben Yagoda. Offers a critical and cultural history of "The New Yorker" from its founding in 1919 through 1987, discussing the evolution of the magazine's content over the years and its role in American cultural life

101 Cryptic Crosswords

Author: Fraser Simpson
Publisher: Sterling Publishing Company, Inc.
ISBN: 9780806901862
Size: 48.20 MB
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101 Cryptic Crosswords from the Author: Fraser Simpson. These puzzles - taken from the celebrated pages of The New Yorker magazine - offer more challenges per 'empty square' than the average crossword! Every cryptic has a twist, a little something extra, a double-dose of difficulty. That's because the clues all have two parts: a definition half and a wordplay half, with anagrams, reversals, containers, and lots of other word games built in. For example, here's a clue: 'Reportedly lost in fog. (4 letters).' Got it? It's 'mist' - a homonym for 'missed' and also a synonym for 'fog'. An introduction enlightens you on all the intricacies of solving cryptic crosswords, and of course the solutions appear at the end with tricks behind the clues explained. It may take a little practice to get the hang of these, but once you do, you'll be hooked for good!

Defining New Yorker Humor

Author: Judith Yaross Lee
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 9781578061983
Size: 24.58 MB
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Defining New Yorker Humor from the Author: Judith Yaross Lee. "The early history of New York is obscured in myth," observed the pseudonymous author of "The Story of Manhattankind" in the first issue of The New Yorker (21 February 1925), "and to separate the purely historical from the purely hysterical is no easy task." The same must be said of the magazine itself. The purely historical remained hidden until The New Yorker's archives were opened to scholars in the mid-nineties, although the hysterical--pure and otherwise--dominates the anecdotes in memoirs of some of the magazine's original staff members. Late in 1924 Harold Ross assembled a small staff to create a new kind of weekly humor magazine, a "reflection in word and picture of metropolitan life . . . with gaiety, wit, and satire." His target audience was affluent, local, educated sophisticates. This is the image he sold to Manhattan advertisers. By 1930 the magazine could withstand the Depression even as its predecessors collapsed. In 1952 W. H. Auden declared The New Yorker "the best comic magazine in existence." In 1994 no one disputed Tina Brown's claim that its cartoons constitute "a sort of national treasure." Drawing on archival records and works by major contributors Judith Yaross Lee traces how artists, writers, and editors realized Ross's vision. This first scholarly history of The New Yorker chronicles the magazine's efforts to define an editorial formula that appealed to readers more interested in Picasso's Paris than in Will Rogers's Oklahoma. Lee recovers hundreds of still-funny cartoons, stories, and verses that were eclipsed because The New Yorker was not indexed and because its editors, until 1969, refused to include a table of contents. Also, she dispels cherished myths of the early years. Far from relying on a few insider wits, the editors scoured unsolicited submissions for new artists and writers, honing every item and inviting new ones. Misogynous in neither policy nor practice, the magazine cultivated women both as readers and contributors. While the beleaguered Little Man staggered through tales of the war between the sexes, equally discouraged women set their version of the battles into rhyme. Lee shows how The New Yorker's eminence in cartoons blossomed as the captions were reduced to one line and as the subjects tweaked class and race prejudice, ridiculed feminism and modernism, lampooned urban customs and types, and created new relations between visual and verbal wit.

Secret Ingredients

Author: David Remnick
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1588368238
Size: 23.79 MB
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Secret Ingredients from the Author: David Remnick. Since its earliest days, The New Yorker has been a tastemaker–literally. As the home of A. J. Liebling, Joseph Wechsberg, and M.F.K. Fisher, who practically invented American food writing, the magazine established a tradition that is carried forward today by irrepressible literary gastronomes, including Calvin Trillin, Bill Buford, Adam Gopnik, Jane Kramer, and Anthony Bourdain. Now, in this indispensable collection, The New Yorker dishes up a feast of delicious writing on food and drink, seasoned with a generous dash of cartoons. Whether you’re in the mood for snacking on humor pieces and cartoons or for savoring classic profiles of great chefs and great eaters, these offerings, from every age of The New Yorker’s fabled eighty-year history, are sure to satisfy every taste. There are memoirs, short stories, tell-alls, and poems–ranging in tone from sweet to sour and in subject from soup to nuts. M.F.K. Fisher pays homage to “cookery witches,” those mysterious cooks who possess “an uncanny power over food,” while John McPhee valiantly trails an inveterate forager and is rewarded with stewed persimmons and white-pine-needle tea. There is Roald Dahl’s famous story “Taste,” in which a wine snob’s palate comes in for some unwelcome scrutiny, and Julian Barnes’s ingenious tale of a lifelong gourmand who goes on a very peculiar diet for still more peculiar reasons. Adam Gopnik asks if French cuisine is done for, and Calvin Trillin investigates whether people can actually taste the difference between red wine and white. We journey with Susan Orlean as she distills the essence of Cuba in the story of a single restaurant, and with Judith Thurman as she investigates the arcane practices of Japan’s tofu masters. Closer to home, Joseph Mitchell celebrates the old New York tradition of the beefsteak dinner, and Mark Singer shadows the city’s foremost fisherman-chef. Selected from the magazine’s plentiful larder, Secret Ingredients celebrates all forms of gustatory delight. From the Hardcover edition.

Moving Kings

Author: Joshua Cohen
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0399590196
Size: 48.34 MB
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Moving Kings from the Author: Joshua Cohen. A propulsive, incendiary novel about faith, race, class, and what it means to have a home, from Joshua Cohen, “a major American writer” (The New York Times) One of the boldest voices of his generation, Joshua Cohen returns with Moving Kings, a powerful and provocative novel that interweaves, in profoundly intimate terms, the housing crisis in America’s poor black and Hispanic neighborhoods with the world's oldest conflict, in the Middle East. The year is 2015, and twenty-one-year-olds Yoav and Uri, veterans of the last Gaza War, have just completed their compulsory military service in the Israel Defense Forces. In keeping with national tradition, they take a year off for rest, recovery, and travel. They come to New York City and begin working for Yoav’s distant cousin David King—a proud American patriot, Republican, and Jew, and the recently divorced proprietor of King’s Moving Inc., a heavyweight in the tri-state area’s moving and storage industries. Yoav and Uri now must struggle to become reacquainted with civilian life, but it’s not easy to move beyond their traumatic pasts when their days are spent kicking down doors as eviction-movers in the ungentrified corners of the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens, throwing out delinquent tenants and seizing their possessions. And what starts off as a profitable if eerily familiar job—an “Occupation”—quickly turns violent when they encounter one homeowner seeking revenge. Advance praise for Moving Kings “This lively story of the fraught ties that bind an American, Republican Jew and his Israeli family makes another strong case for Cohen’s admission into the ranks of the Great American Novelists.”—Esquire “Joshua Cohen’s Moving Kings is a lit fuse, a force let loose, a creeping flame heading for demolition, and Cohen himself is a fierce polyknower in command of the moving parts of the human predicament. A master of argot and wit, he writes the language of men in a staccato yet keening idiom of his own invention. And though it is set in a grungy New York, call this the first Israeli combat novel ever dared by an American writer.”—Cynthia Ozick “Joshua Cohen is a blacksmith who heats, hammers, and molds the language to sharpest, most precise points—not for the sake of craft, but to tell a troubled story about troubled life in the twenty-first century. This is a dazzling and poignant book.”—Rachel Kushner “Funny, smart, and perfectly addictive, Moving Kings is a novel of wonderful scope. It shows Cohen at the top of his powers and is bound to bring him many new readers, hot for a fresh understanding of America.”—Andrew O’Hagan, author of The Illuminations “Though written with all the swagger, dazzle, and gonzo humor we’ve come to expect from Cohen, Moving Kings is a focused, efficient novel about the idea of home and its absence, about what it means to be unhomed and what it might feel like to unhome others in turn.”—Bookforum “In his audacious new novel, [Joshua] Cohen confronts the bewildering nature of displacement. . . . Lovingly personal character studies, an outrageous sense of humor, and a voice both stylish and astute.”—Booklist “Wild brilliance . . . An ambitious and thought-provoking read.”—Publishers Weekly “A wide-ranging novel that touches on political, religious, and social issues . . . [Cohen] is funny and caustic and has a marvelous snap in his dialogue.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Writing In The Dark Dancing In The New Yorker

Author: Arlene Croce
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1429930136
Size: 17.83 MB
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Writing In The Dark Dancing In The New Yorker from the Author: Arlene Croce. The best of America's best writer on dance "Theoretically, I am ready to go to anything-once. If it moves, I'm interested; if it moves to music, I'm in love." From 1973 until 1996 Arlene Croce was The New Yorker's dance critic, a post created for her. Her entertaining, forthright, passionate reviews and essays have revealed the logic and history of ballet, modern dance, and their postmodern variants to a generation of theatergoers. This volume contains her most significant and provocative pieces-over a fourth have never appeared in book form-writings that reverberate with consequence and controversy for the state of the art today.

Nobody S Perfect

Author: Anthony Lane
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 030748887X
Size: 47.55 MB
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Nobody S Perfect from the Author: Anthony Lane. Anthony Lane on Con Air— “Advance word on Con Air said that it was all about an airplane with an unusually dangerous and potentially lethal load. Big deal. You should try the lunches they serve out of Newark. Compared with the chicken napalm I ate on my last flight, the men in Con Air are about as dangerous as balloons.” Anthony Lane on The Bridges of Madison County— “I got my copy at the airport, behind a guy who was buying Playboy’s Book of Lingerie, and I think he had the better deal. He certainly looked happy with his purchase, whereas I had to ask for a paper bag.” Anthony Lane on Martha Stewart— “Super-skilled, free of fear, the last word in human efficiency, Martha Stewart is the woman who convinced a million Americans that they have the time, the means, the right, and—damn it—the duty to pipe a little squirt of soft cheese into the middle of a snow pea, and to continue piping until there are ‘fifty to sixty’ stuffed peas raring to go.” For ten years, Anthony Lane has delighted New Yorker readers with his film reviews, book reviews, and profiles that range from Buster Keaton to Vladimir Nabokov to Ernest Shackleton. Nobody’s Perfect is an unforgettable collection of Lane’s trademark wit, satire, and insight that will satisfy both the long addicted and the not so familiar. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Making It

Author: Norman Podhoretz
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 1681370816
Size: 50.58 MB
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Making It from the Author: Norman Podhoretz. A controversial memoir about American intellectual life and academia and the relationship between politics, money, and education. Norman Podhoretz, the son of Jewish immigrants, grew up in the tough Brownsville section of Brooklyn, attended Columbia University on a scholarship, and later received degrees from the Jewish Theological Seminary and Cambridge University. Making It is his blistering account of fighting his way out of Brooklyn and into, then out of, the Ivory Tower, of his military service, and finally of his induction into the ranks of what he calls “the Family,” the small group of left-wing and largely Jewish critics and writers whose opinions came to dominate and increasingly politicize the American literary scene in the fifties and sixties. It is a Balzacian story of raw talent and relentless and ruthless ambition. It is also a closely observed and in many ways still-pertinent analysis of the tense and more than a little duplicitous relationship that exists in America between intellect and imagination, money, social status, and power. The Family responded to the book with outrage, and Podhoretz soon turned no less angrily on them, becoming the fierce neoconservative he remains to this day. Fifty years after its first publication, this controversial and legendary book remains a riveting autobiography, a book that can be painfully revealing about the complex convictions and needs of a complicated man as well as a fascinating and essential document of mid-century American cultural life.

The World Through A Monocle

Author: Mary F. Corey
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674029859
Size: 76.71 MB
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The World Through A Monocle from the Author: Mary F. Corey. Today "The New Yorker" is one of a number of general-interest magazines published for a sophisticated audience, but in the post-World War II era the magazine occupied a truly significant niche of cultural authority. A self-selected community of 250,000 readers, who wanted to know how to look and sound cosmopolitan, found in its pages information about night spots and polo teams. They became conversant with English movies, Italian Communism, French wine, the bombing of the Bikini Atoll, pret-a-porter, and Caribbean vacations. A well-known critic lamented that "certain groups have come to communicate almost exclusively in references to the [magazine's] sacred writings." "The World through a Monocle" is a study of these "sacred writings." Mary Corey mines the magazine's editorial voice, journalism, fiction, advertisements, cartoons, and poetry to unearth the preoccupations, values, and conflicts of its readers, editors, and contributors. She delineates the effort to fuse liberal ideals with aspirations to high social status, finds the magazine's blind spots with regard to women and racial and ethnic stereotyping, and explores its abiding concern with elite consumption coupled with a contempt for mass production and popular advertising. Balancing the consumption of goods with a social conscience which prized goodness, the magazine managed to provide readers with what seemed like a coherent and comprehensive value system in an incoherent world. Viewing the world through a monocle, those who created "The New Yorker" and those who believed in it cultivated a uniquely powerful cultural institution serving an influential segment of the population. Corey's work illuminates this extraordinary enterprise in our social history.