The Gibraltar Crusade

Author: Joseph F. O'Callaghan
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812204638
Size: 66.40 MB
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The Gibraltar Crusade from the Author: Joseph F. O'Callaghan. The epic battle for control of the Strait of Gibraltar waged by Castile, Morocco, and Granada in the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries is a major, but often overlooked, chapter in the history of the Christian reconquest of Spain. After the Castilian conquest of Seville in 1248 and the submission of the Muslim kingdom of Granada as a vassal state, the Moors no longer loomed as a threat and the reconquest seemed to be over. Still, in the following century, the Castilian kings, prompted by ideology and strategy, attempted to dominate the Strait. As self-proclaimed heirs of the Visigoths, they aspired not only to reconstitute the Visigothic kingdom by expelling the Muslims from Spain but also to conquer Morocco as part of the Visigothic legacy. As successive bands of Muslims over the centuries had crossed the Strait from Morocco into Spain, the kings of Castile recognized the strategic importance of securing Algeciras, Gibraltar, and Tarifa, the ports long used by the invaders. At a time when European enthusiasm for the crusade to the Holy Land was on the wane, the Christian struggle for the Strait received the character of a crusade as papal bulls conferred the crusading indulgence as well as ancillary benefits. The Gibraltar Crusade had mixed results. Although the Castilians seized Gibraltar in 1309 and Algeciras in 1344, the Moors eventually repossessed them. Only Tarifa, captured in 1292, remained in Castilian hands. Nevertheless, the power of the Marinid dynasty of Morocco was broken at the battle of Salado in 1340, and for the remainder of the Middle Ages Spain was relieved of the threat of Moroccan invasion. While the reconquest remained dormant during the late fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries, Ferdinand and Isabella conquered Granada, the last Muslim outpost in Spain, in 1492. In subsequent years Castile fulfilled its earlier aspirations by establishing a foothold in Morocco.

To Win And Lose A Medieval Battle

Author: Andrew Villalon
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004345809
Size: 80.37 MB
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To Win And Lose A Medieval Battle from the Author: Andrew Villalon. In To Win or Lose a Medieval Battle, Andrew Villalon and Donald Kagay provide a full treatment of one of the major battles of the Hundred Years War. The authors have investigated the background to Nájera, traced its immediate events, and laid out its effects on Iberia and the principal adversaries in the Hundred Years War.

The Last Crusade In The West

Author: Joseph F. O'Callaghan
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812209354
Size: 37.67 MB
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The Last Crusade In The West from the Author: Joseph F. O'Callaghan. By the middle of the fourteenth century, Christian control of the Iberian Peninsula extended to the borders of the emirate of Granada, whose Muslim rulers acknowledged Castilian suzerainty. No longer threatened by Moroccan incursions, the kings of Castile were diverted from completing the Reconquest by civil war and conflicts with neighboring Christian kings. Mindful, however, of their traditional goal of recovering lands formerly ruled by the Visigoths, whose heirs they claimed to be, the Castilian monarchs continued intermittently to assault Granada until the late fifteenth century. Matters changed thereafter, when Fernando and Isabel launched a decade-long effort to subjugate Granada. Utilizing artillery and expending vast sums of money, they methodically conquered each Naṣrid stronghold until the capitulation of the city of Granada itself in 1492. Effective military and naval organization and access to a diversity of financial resources, joined with papal crusading benefits, facilitated the final conquest. Throughout, the Naṣrids had emphasized the urgency of a jihād waged against the Christian infidels, while the Castilians affirmed that the expulsion of the "enemies of our Catholic faith" was a necessary, just, and holy cause. The fundamentally religious character of this last stage of conflict cannot be doubted, Joseph F. O'Callaghan argues.

Shipping Trade And Crusade In The Medieval Mediterranean

Author: Ruthy Gertwagen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317055306
Size: 57.62 MB
Format: PDF
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Shipping Trade And Crusade In The Medieval Mediterranean from the Author: Ruthy Gertwagen. The cutting-edge papers in this collection reflect the wide areas to which John Pryor has made significant contributions in the course of his scholarly career. They are written by some of the world's most distinguished practitioners in the fields of Crusading history and the maritime history of the medieval Mediterranean. His colleagues, students and friends discuss questions including ship construction in the fourth and fifteenth centuries, navigation and harbourage in the eastern Mediterranean, trade in Fatimid Egypt and along the Iberian Peninsula, military and social issues arising among the crusaders during field campaigns, and wider aspects of medieval warfare. All those with an interest in any of these subjects, whether students or specialists, will need to consult this book.

All Can Be Saved

Author: Stuart B. Schwartz
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300150539
Size: 42.59 MB
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All Can Be Saved from the Author: Stuart B. Schwartz. It would seem unlikely that one could discover tolerant religious attitudes in Spain, Portugal, and the New World colonies during the era of the Inquisition, when enforcement of Catholic orthodoxy was widespread and brutal. Yet this groundbreaking book does exactly that. Drawing on an enormous body of historical evidence--including records of the Inquisition itself--the historian Stuart Schwartz investigates the idea of religious tolerance and its evolution in the Hispanic world from 1500 to 1820. Focusing on the attitudes and beliefs of common people rather than those of intellectual elites, the author finds that no small segment of the population believed in freedom of conscience and rejected the exclusive validity of the Church. The book explores various sources of tolerant attitudes, the challenges that the New World presented to religious orthodoxy, the complex relations between popular and learned culture, and many related topics. The volume concludes with a discussion of the relativist ideas that were taking hold elsewhere in Europe during this era.

The Muslims Of Valencia In The Age Of Fernando And Isabel

Author: Mark D. Meyerson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520068889
Size: 48.29 MB
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The Muslims Of Valencia In The Age Of Fernando And Isabel from the Author: Mark D. Meyerson. "An exciting and magisterial contribution to Mudejar studies, it is also revisionist in its conclusions as to crown policies about these peoples."--Robert I. Burns, S.J., University of California, Los Angeles "An exciting and magisterial contribution to Mudejar studies, it is also revisionist in its conclusions as to crown policies about these peoples."--Robert I. Burns, S.J., University of California, Los Angeles

Crusaders Condottieri And Cannon

Author: Donald Joseph Kagay
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9789004125537
Size: 48.13 MB
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Crusaders Condottieri And Cannon from the Author: Donald Joseph Kagay. This collection of eighteen essays focuses on various phases of warfare around the medieval Mediterranean. Topics of these essays range from crusading activity to the increasing use of mercenaries to the spread of gunpowder weaponry.

Reconquest And Crusade In Medieval Spain

Author: Joseph F. O'Callaghan
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812203062
Size: 22.83 MB
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Reconquest And Crusade In Medieval Spain from the Author: Joseph F. O'Callaghan. Drawing from both Christian and Islamic sources, Reconquest and Crusade in Medieval Spain demonstrates that the clash of arms between Christians and Muslims in the Iberian peninsula that began in the early eighth century was transformed into a crusade by the papacy during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Successive popes accorded to Christian warriors willing to participate in the peninsular wars against Islam the same crusading benefits offered to those going to the Holy Land. Joseph F. O'Callaghan clearly demonstrates that any study of the history of the crusades must take a broader view of the Mediterranean to include medieval Spain. Following a chronological overview of crusading in the Iberian peninsula from the late eleventh to the middle of the thirteenth century, O'Callaghan proceeds to the study of warfare, military finance, and the liturgy of reconquest and crusading. He concludes his book with a consideration of the later stages of reconquest and crusade up to and including the fall of Granada in 1492, while noting that the spiritual benefits of crusading bulls were still offered to the Spanish until the Second Vatican Council of 1963. Although the conflict described in this book occurred more than eight hundred years ago, recent events remind the world that the intensity of belief, rhetoric, and action that gave birth to crusade, holy war, and jihad remains a powerful force in the twenty-first century.