Terry Sanford

Author: Howard E. Covington
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822323563
Size: 71.85 MB
Format: PDF
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Terry Sanford from the Author: Howard E. Covington. Sanford was an important public figures of postwar South. First as North Carolina's governor and later as president of Duke University, he demonstrated a dynamic style of leadership marked by creativity, helping transform Southern life. 87 photos.

Triumph Of Good Will

Author: John Drescher
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 9781604738056
Size: 14.66 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Triumph Of Good Will from the Author: John Drescher. "Both Terry Sanford and I. Beverly Lake were Democrats in the one-party South of that era. Yet they were different in almost every other way. Lake, a middle-aged law professor, was committed to segregation. Sanford, an ambitious young politician and lawyer, believed in expanding opportunities for all citizens. Their race was a heated struggle that would bind them together for the rest of their lives." "With unparalleled access to both sides and with an objective correspondent's hindsight view, John Drescher has written the story of a campaign that set the winning strategy for many who followed, and the biography of a winning candidate, a governor rated as one of the finest of the twentieth century."--BOOK JACKET.

Oral History Interview With Terry Sanford Date Unknown

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Oral History Interview With Terry Sanford Date Unknown from the Author: . Sanford assesses the progressivism of North Carolina politics, arguing that though North Carolinians as a whole are not solidly progressive, they do tend to embrace progressive ideas. Sanford points to Chapel Hill as the beacon of North Carolina politics, where progressivism dominated the political discourse. He also discusses the potency of race in political campaigns, highlighting the 1950 Frank Graham-Willis Smith Senate race and his 1960 gubernatorial campaign against I. Beverley Lake. Sanford contends that racially charged campaigns often determined the direction and fate of politicians' careers. His work with established Democratic Party organizations taught him important lessons on how to divert the public's attention from racial matters to other campaign issues. Sanford explains that North Carolina did not support machine politics, although the state was dominated by the Democratic Party for nearly a century. Bert Bennett's integral role as political campaigner helped ensure Democratic rule over the state. However, as the Republican Party began to challenge the Democratic Party, North Carolina's one-party domination system was abandoned. Sanford asserts that the realignment of political parties was able to occur because unfavorable public memories about Republicans faded and internal fighting among Democrats increased. With his 1972 presidential bid, Sanford realized that Republicans' use of conservative political ideology and rhetoric heavily influenced the future of North Carolina politics. Sanford contends that Southern distinctiveness no longer divides the nation, as ideology replaced race as important campaign issues in the 1970s. Sanford finishes the interview by emphasizing the importance of ethics and credibility in political campaigns. He discusses how the increased use of television ads changes campaign strategies and how they impact the ethics of politicians.

Oral History Interview With Terry Sanford December 18 1990

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Oral History Interview With Terry Sanford December 18 1990 from the Author: . Terry Sanford begins this interview with a discussion of the student demonstrations and protests that were sweeping Chapel Hill, North Carolina, during his years as the Governor of North Carolina (1961-1965). The protests, one of whose aims was to bring about open accommodations laws, were largely fueled by student activism. Sanford describes how Anne Queen, director of the YMCA/YWCA at the University of North Carolina, helped to calm demonstrating students. Sanford uses this episode to segue into a broader discussion of Queen's leadership at UNC during those tumultuous years, arguing that she turned the YMCA/YWCA into the "social conscience" of the University. He also describes his professional relationship with her during the early 1960s. Likening Queen's leadership style to that of Frank Porter Graham and William Friday, Sanford argues that universities (and specifically the University of North Carolina) played an important and unique role in the advance of social change during the mid-twentieth century. Sanford also briefly discusses his own support for civil rights and his bid for the governorship in 1961.

Outlive Your Enemies

Author: Terry Sanford
Publisher: Kroshka Books
ISBN: 9781560722892
Size: 59.56 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Outlive Your Enemies from the Author: Terry Sanford. This work seeks to provide a guide to the ageing process for senior citizens. It outlines actions that will slow the process and concludes with four fairly simple rules to prolong healthy life. Diet and vitamins, exercise, medical examinations and the avoidance of bad habits are covered.

Oral History Interview With Terry Sanford May 14 1976 Interview A 0328 1

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Oral History Interview With Terry Sanford May 14 1976 Interview A 0328 1 from the Author: . Terry Sanford begins the interview by describing early impressions of his hometown of Laurinburg, North Carolina, and his family background. He notes that his interest in politics was awakened early--both by his father's support of underdog and liberal candidates and by the 1928 Alfred Smith presidential campaign. Sanford describes the Democratic political dynasties and discusses how the Democratic Party maintained its political stronghold on North Carolina as a result of effective political organizations and the state's one-party politics. Sanford's political education began in earnest as a student at the University of North Carolina, where he became influenced by the progressive and liberal politics of UNC president Frank Porter Graham and sociology professor Howard Odum. UNC's law school also served as a political training ground for Democratic candidates, says Sanford; there, he learned organizing and campaigning strategies from the Chapel Hill-influenced political leadership. He ran as president of the Young Democrats, an established political training group. Sanford discusses the growing rift between the conservative and progressive factions within the Democratic Party, which ruled politics in North Carolina at the time. He recalls the 1950 race-baiting senatorial campaign against Frank Porter Graham and Willis Smith. Learning from this, Sanford vowed to defend his platform aggressively against his opponent's negative campaigning. Sanford explains his decision not to run for governor against Luther Hodges in 1956, due in large part to his relative lack of political experience. After his decision, Sanford gained more political experience through the established ranks of the Democratic Party and run successfully for governor in 1960 against segregationist candidate I. Beverly Lake. Toward the end of the interview, Sanford offers his thoughts on the administrations of his three gubernatorial successors: Dan Moore, Robert Scott, and James Holshouser.

To Right These Wrongs

Author: Robert R. Korstad
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807895740
Size: 61.16 MB
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To Right These Wrongs from the Author: Robert R. Korstad. When Governor Terry Sanford established the North Carolina Fund in 1963, he saw it as a way to provide a better life for the "tens of thousands whose family income is so low that daily subsistence is always in doubt." Illustrated with evocative photographs by Billy Barnes, To Right These Wrongs offers a lively account of this pioneering effort in America's War on Poverty. Robert Korstad and James Leloudis describe how the Fund's initial successes grew out of its reliance on private philanthropy and federal dollars and its commitment to the democratic mobilization of the poor. Both were calculated tactics designed to outflank conservative state lawmakers and entrenched local interests that nourished Jim Crow, perpetuated one-party politics, and protected an economy built on cheap labor. By late 1968, when the Fund closed its doors, a resurgent politics of race had gained the advantage, led by a Republican Party that had reorganized itself around opposition to civil rights and aid to the poor. The North Carolina Fund came up short in its battle against poverty, but its story continues to be a source of inspiration and instruction for new generations of Americans.