Surviving On The Gold Mountain

Author: Huping Ling
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780791438633
Size: 29.47 MB
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Surviving On The Gold Mountain from the Author: Huping Ling. The first comprehensive work on Chinese American women's history covering the past 150 years.

Chinese Laundries Tickets To Survival On Gold Mountain

Author: John Jung
Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc
ISBN: 1257149245
Size: 33.58 MB
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Chinese Laundries Tickets To Survival On Gold Mountain from the Author: John Jung. A social history of the role of the Chinese laundry on the survival of early Chinese immigrants in the U.S.during the Chinese Exclusion law period, 1882-1943, and in Canada during the years of the Head Tax, 1885-1923, and exclusion law, 1923-1947. Why and how Chinese got into the laundry business and how they had to fight discriminatory laws and competition from white-owned laundries to survive. Description of their lives, work demands, and living conditions. Reflections by a sample of children who grew up living in the backs of their laundries provide vivid first-person glimpses of the difficult lives of Chinese laundrymen and their families.

Dreaming Of Gold Dreaming Of Home

Author: Madeline Y. Hsu
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804746878
Size: 37.96 MB
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Dreaming Of Gold Dreaming Of Home from the Author: Madeline Y. Hsu. This book is a highly original study of transnationalism among immigrants from the county of Taishan, from which, until 1965, a high percentage of the Chinese in the United States originated. The author vividly depicts the continuing ties between Taishanese remaining in China and their kinsmen seeking their fortune in "Gold Mountain."

Voices Of The Heart

Author: Huping Ling
Publisher: Truman State Univ Press
ISBN: 1931112681
Size: 50.88 MB
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Voices Of The Heart from the Author: Huping Ling. Huping Ling gathers Asian American women's heartfelt stories about their journeys to America, their aspirations, their strides in education and employment, their cultural heritage, and their family dynamics.

Chinese Mexicans

Author: Julia MarĂ­a Schiavone Camacho
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807882593
Size: 22.14 MB
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Chinese Mexicans from the Author: Julia MarĂ­a Schiavone Camacho. At the turn of the twentieth century, a wave of Chinese men made their way to the northern Mexican border state of Sonora to work and live. The ties--and families--these Mexicans and Chinese created led to the formation of a new cultural identity: Chinese Mexican. During the tumult of the Mexican Revolution of 1910, however, anti-Chinese sentiment ultimately led to mass expulsion of these people. Julia Maria Schiavone Camacho follows the community through the mid-twentieth century, across borders and oceans, to show how they fought for their place as Mexicans, both in Mexico and abroad. Tracing transnational geography, Schiavone Camacho explores how these men and women developed a strong sense of Mexican national identity while living abroad--in the United States, briefly, and then in southeast Asia where they created a hybrid community and taught their children about the Mexican homeland. Schiavone Camacho also addresses how Mexican women challenged their legal status after being stripped of Mexican citizenship because they married Chinese men. After repatriation in the 1930s-1960s, Chinese Mexican men and women, who had left Mexico with strong regional identities, now claimed national cultural belonging and Mexican identity in ways they had not before.

The Columbia Guide To Asian American History

Author: Gary Y. Okihiro
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231505957
Size: 31.66 MB
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The Columbia Guide To Asian American History from the Author: Gary Y. Okihiro. Offering a rich and insightful road map of Asian American history as it has evolved over more than 200 years, this book marks the first systematic attempt to take stock of this field of study. It examines, comments, and questions the changing assumptions and contexts underlying the experiences and contributions of an incredibly diverse population of Americans. Arriving and settling in this nation as early as the 1790s, with American-born generations stretching back more than a century, Asian Americans have become an integral part of the American experience; this cleverly organized book marks the trajectory of that journey, offering researchers invaluable information and interpretation. • Part 1 offers a synoptic narrative history, a chronology, and a set of periodizations that reflect different ways of constructing the Asian American past. • Part 2 presents lucid discussions of historical debates—such as interpreting the anti-Chinese movement of the late 1800s and the underlying causes of Japanese American internment during World War II—and such emerging themes as transnationalism and women and gender issues. • Part 3 contains a historiographical essay and a wide-ranging compilation of book, film, and electronic resources for further study of core themes and groups, including Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Hmong, Indian, Korean, Vietnamese, and others.

Chinese In St Louis

Author: Huping Ling
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439618968
Size: 61.97 MB
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Chinese In St Louis from the Author: Huping Ling. In 1857, Alla Lee, a 24yearold native of Ningbo, China, seeking a better life, came to St. Louis. A decade later, Lee was joined by several hundred of his countrymen from San Francisco and New York who were seeking jobs in mines and factories in and around St. Louis. Most of these Chinese workers lived in boardinghouses located near a street called Hop Alley. In time, Chinese hand laundries, merchandise stores, herb shops, restaurants, and clan association headquarters sprang up in and around that street, forming St. Louis Chinatown. Hop Alley survived with remarkable resilience and energy until 1966 when urban renewal bulldozers leveled the area to make a parking lot for Busch Stadium. A new suburban Chinese American community has been quietly, yet rapidly, emerging since the 1960s in the form of cultural community, where the Chinese churches, Chineselanguage schools, and community organizations serve as the infrastructure of the community.

Asian America

Author: Huping Ling
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813548675
Size: 10.16 MB
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Asian America from the Author: Huping Ling. The last half century witnessed a dramatic change in the geographic, ethnographic, and socioeconomic structure of Asian American communities. While traditional enclaves were strengthened by waves of recent immigrants, native-born Asian Americans also created new urban and suburban areas. Asian America is the first comprehensive look at post-1960s Asian American communities in the United States and Canada. From Chinese Americans in Chicagoland to Vietnamese Americans in Orange County, this multi-disciplinary collection spans a wide comparative and panoramic scope. Contributors from an array of academic fields focus on global views of Asian American communities as well as on territorial and cultural boundaries. Presenting groundbreaking perspectives, Asian America revises worn assumptions and examines current challenges Asian American communities face in the twenty-first century.

The Chinatown War

Author: Scott Zesch
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199942692
Size: 74.53 MB
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The Chinatown War from the Author: Scott Zesch. In October 1871, a simmering, small-scale turf war involving three Chinese gangs exploded into a riot that engulfed the small but growing town of Los Angeles. A large mob of white Angelenos, spurred by racial resentment, rampaged through the city and lynched some 18 people before order was restored. In The Chinatown War, Scott Zesch offers a compelling account of this little-known event, which ranks among the worst hate crimes in American history. The story begins in the 1850s, when the first wave of Chinese immigrants arrived in Los Angeles in the wake of the 1849 California gold rush. Upon arrival, these immigrants usually took up low-wage jobs, settled in the slum neighborhood of the Calle de los Negros, and joined one of a number of Chinese community associations. Though such associations provided job placement and other services to their members, they were also involved in extortion and illicit businesses, including prostitution. In 1870 the largest of these, the See-Yup Company, imploded in an acrimonious division. The violent succession battle that ensued, as well as the highly publicized torture of Chinese prostitute Sing-Ye, eventually provided the spark for the racially motivated riot that ripped through L.A. Zesch vividly evokes the figures and events in the See-Yup dispute, deftly situates the riot within its historical and political context, and illuminates the workings of the early Chinese-American community in Los Angeles, while simultaneously exploring issues that continue to trouble Americans today. Engaging and deeply researched, The Chinatown War above all delivers a riveting story of a dominant American city and the darker side of its early days that offers powerful insights for our own time.

The Chinese Americans

Author: Barbara Lee Bloom
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781560067511
Size: 73.98 MB
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The Chinese Americans from the Author: Barbara Lee Bloom. Discusses the reasons for emigration from China to mainland United States and Hawaii as well as the social and economic problems experienced by the Chinese Americans.