So Far From God

Author: John S.D. Eisenhower
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0307827682
Size: 42.80 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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So Far From God from the Author: John S.D. Eisenhower. The Mexican-American War of the 1840s, precipitated by border disputes and the U.S. annexation of Texas, ended with the military occupation of Mexico City by General Winfield Scott. In the subsequent treaty, the United States gained territory that would become California, Nevada, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, and parts of Wyoming and Colorado. In this highly readable account, John S. D. Eisenhower provides a comprehensive survey of this frequently overlooked war. NOTE: This edition does not include photographs.

So Far From God

Author: John S. D. Eisenhower
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806132792
Size: 38.20 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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So Far From God from the Author: John S. D. Eisenhower. The Mexican-American War of the 1840s, precipitated by border disputes and the U.S. annexation of Texas, ended with the military occupation of Mexico City by General Winfield Scott. In the subsequent treaty, the United States gained territory that would become California, Nevada, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, and parts of Wyoming and Colorado. In this highly readable account, John S.D. Eisenhower provides a comprehensive survey of this frequently overlooked war.

A Glorious Defeat

Author: Timothy J. Henderson
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 9781429922791
Size: 30.25 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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A Glorious Defeat from the Author: Timothy J. Henderson. The war that was fought between the United States and Mexico from 1846 to 1848 was a major event in the history of both countries: it cost Mexico half of its national territory, opened western North America to U.S. expansion, and brought to the surface a host of tensions that led to devastating civil wars in both countries. Among generations of Latin Americans, it helped to cement the image of the United States as an arrogant, aggressive, and imperialist nation, poisoning relations between a young America and its southern neighbors. In contrast with many current books that treat the war as a fundamentally American experience, Timothy J. Henderson's A Glorious Defeat offers a fresh perspective on the Mexican side of the equation. Examining the manner in which Mexico gained independence, Henderson brings to light a greater understanding of that country's intense factionalism and political paralysis leading up to and through the war. Also touching on a range of topics from culture, ethnicity, religion, and geography, this comprehensive yet concise narrative humanizes the conflict and serves as the perfect introduction for new readers of Mexican history.

Dueling Eagles

Author: Richard V. Francaviglia
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 50.90 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Dueling Eagles from the Author: Richard V. Francaviglia. For a hundred and fifty years, historians have debated contradictory claims about the origins of the Mexican War and ignored the impact of the social, historical, and geographical features of both the United States and Mexico on that war. Instead, scholars have focused primarily on military strategy and campaigns. “North American historiography,” claims El Colegio de México historian Josefina Zoraida Vázquez, “has elucidated all aspects of the war: battles, strategy, weapons, casualties, desertions, background of the soldiers, finances, and regional variations. Mexican scholars, until recently, have preferred not only to avoid the war, but also the thankless period of national life that proceeds from independence to the end of the conflict.” Dueling Eagles brings together essays by respected American and Mexican scholars to reveal unparalleled views of the war, including the influence of Great Britain, the role of the first war correspondents and how their dispatches were perceived in Mexico and America, and the reasons for the collaboration by many Mexicans with United States troops. The portrayals of the two countries’ viewpoints create a better understanding of the war’s significance, not only on each nation’s history but also on the international relationship that remains despite the demarcation of the greatly disputed U.S.-Mexican border.

Agent Of Destiny

Author: John S. D. Eisenhower
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806131283
Size: 15.19 MB
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Agent Of Destiny from the Author: John S. D. Eisenhower. The hero of the War of 1812, the conqueror of Mexico City in the Mexican-American War, and Abraham Lincoln’s top soldier during the first six months of the Civil War, General Winfield Scott was a seminal force in the early expansion and consolidation of the American republic. John S. D. Eisenhower explores how Scott, who served under fourteen presidents, played a leading role in the development of the United States Army from a tiny, loosely organized, politics-dominated establishment to a disciplined professional force capable of effective and sustained campaigning.

The Texas Revolution And The U S Mexican War

Author: Paul Calore
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 078647940X
Size: 62.73 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The Texas Revolution And The U S Mexican War from the Author: Paul Calore. This narrative history describes the events preceding, and the prosecution of, the Texas Revolution and the U.S.-Mexican War. It begins with the introduction of the empresario system in Mexico in 1823, a system of land distribution to American farmers and ranchers in an attempt to strengthen the postwar economy following Mexico's independence from Spain. Once welcomed as fellow countrymen, the new settlers, homesteading on land destined to be called Texas, were viewed as enemies when in 1835 they revolted against the government's harsh Centralist rulings. Winning independence from Mexico and recognition from the United States as the independent Republic of Texas only intensified the Mexican refusal to accept their loss of Texas as legitimate. The final straw for both sides came when Texas was granted U.S. statehood and 11 American soldiers were ambushed and murdered. As a result, Congress declared war on Mexico, a bloody conflict that resulted in the U.S. gain of 525,000 square miles.

A Wicked War

Author: Amy S. Greenberg
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307960919
Size: 20.16 MB
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A Wicked War from the Author: Amy S. Greenberg. Often forgotten and overlooked, the U.S.-Mexican War featured false starts, atrocities, and daring back-channel negotiations as it divided the nation, paved the way for the Civil War a generation later, and launched the career of Abraham Lincoln. Amy S. Greenberg’s skilled storytelling and rigorous scholarship bring this American war for empire to life with memorable characters, plotlines, and legacies. When President James K. Polk compelled a divided Congress to support his war with Mexico, it was the first time that the young American nation would engage another republic in battle. Caught up in the conflict and the political furor surrounding it were Abraham Lincoln, then a new congressman; Polk, the dour president committed to territorial expansion at any cost; and Henry Clay, the aging statesman whose presidential hopes had been frustrated once again, but who still harbored influence and had one last great speech up his sleeve. Beyond these illustrious figures, A Wicked War follows several fascinating and long-neglected characters: Lincoln’s archrival John Hardin, whose death opened the door to Lincoln’s rise; Nicholas Trist, gentleman diplomat and secret negotiator, who broke with his president to negotiate a fair peace; and Polk’s wife, Sarah, whose shrewd politicking was crucial in the Oval Office. This definitive history of the 1846 conflict paints an intimate portrait of the major players and their world. It is a story of Indian fights, Manifest Destiny, secret military maneuvers, gunshot wounds, and political spin. Along the way it captures a young Lincoln mismatching his clothes, the lasting influence of the Founding Fathers, the birth of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and America’s first national antiwar movement. A key chapter in the creation of the United States, it is the story of a burgeoning nation and an unforgettable conflict that has shaped American history.

Intervention

Author: John S. D. Eisenhower
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393313185
Size: 70.15 MB
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Intervention from the Author: John S. D. Eisenhower. Recounts President Woodrow Wilson's abortive efforts to preserve democracy in Mexico amid political chaos

Invading Mexico

Author: Joseph Wheelan
Publisher: Public Affairs
ISBN:
Size: 36.33 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Invading Mexico from the Author: Joseph Wheelan. Presents an account of the Mexican War, providing an analysis of its cause, battles, weapons, and outcome.