Sephardi Lives

Author: Julia Philips Cohen
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804791910
Size: 39.83 MB
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Sephardi Lives from the Author: Julia Philips Cohen. This ground-breaking documentary history contains over 150 primary sources originally written in 15 languages by or about Sephardi Jews—descendants of Jews who fled medieval Spain and Portugal settling in the western portions of the Ottoman Empire, including the Balkans, Anatolia, and Palestine. Reflecting Sephardi history in all its diversity, from the courtyard to the courthouse, spheres intimate, political, commercial, familial, and religious, these documents show life within these distinctive Jewish communities as well as between Jews, Muslims, and Christians. Sephardi Lives offer readers an intimate view of how Sephardim experienced the major regional and world events of the modern era—natural disasters, violence and wars, the transition from empire to nation-states, and the Holocaust. This collection also provides a vivid exploration of the day-to-day lives of Sephardi women, men, boys, and girls in the Judeo-Spanish heartland of the Ottoman Balkans and Middle East, as well as the émigré centers Sephardim settled throughout the twentieth century, including North and South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe. The selections are of a vast range, including private letters from family collections, rabbinical writings, documents of state, memoirs and diaries, court records, selections from the popular press, and scholarship. In a single volume, Sephardi Lives preserves the cultural richness and historical complexity of a Sephardi world that is no more.

Becoming Ottomans

Author: Julia Phillips Cohen
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199340404
Size: 77.96 MB
Format: PDF
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Becoming Ottomans from the Author: Julia Phillips Cohen. Becoming Ottomans is the first book to tell the story of Jewish political integration into a modern Islamic empire. It follows the efforts of Sephardi Jews from Salonica to Izmir to Istanbul to become citizens of their state during the final half century of the Ottoman Empire's existence.

Jewish Salonica

Author: Devin Naar
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 1503600084
Size: 33.42 MB
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Jewish Salonica from the Author: Devin Naar. Touted as the "Jerusalem of the Balkans," the Mediterranean port city of Salonica (Thessaloniki) was once home to the largest Sephardic Jewish community in the world. The collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the city's incorporation into Greece in 1912 provoked a major upheaval that compelled Salonica's Jews to reimagine their community and status as citizens of a nation-state. "Jewish Salonica" is the first book to tell the story of this tumultuous transition through the voices and perspectives of Salonican Jews as they forged a new place for themselves in Greek society. Devin E. Naar traveled the globe, from New York to Salonica, Jerusalem, and Moscow, to excavate archives once confiscated by the Nazis. Written in Ladino, Greek, French, and Hebrew, these archives, combined with local newspapers, reveal how Salonica's Jews fashioned a new hybrid identity as Hellenic Jews during a period marked by rising nationalism and economic crisis as well as unprecedented Jewish cultural and political vibrancy. Salonica's JewsZionists, assimilationists, and socialistsreinvigorated their connection to the city and claimed it as their own until the Holocaust. Through the case of Salonica's Jews, Naar recovers the diverse experiences of a lost religious, linguistic, and national minority at the crossroads of Europe and the Middle East."

Sephardi Jewry

Author: Esther Benbassa
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520218222
Size: 36.14 MB
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Sephardi Jewry from the Author: Esther Benbassa. Praise for the French edition: "The most complete and thorough historical synthesis ever written in a European language on the Jewish communities of the Balkans and Turkey."--Michel Abitbol, L'arche "A rich and too-little-known history that successfully avoids twin snares: the myth of the irreparable decadence of oriental Judaism and the myth of the lost golden age of Spain."--Alain Dieckhoff, Les Nouveaux Cahiers "The authors illuminate the variety of responses--between the poles of westernizing and holding onto tradition--offered by these Jewish societies of the Levantine Sephardi cultural area to the processes of modernization, as well as their startling receptivity to the new ideologies of zionism and socialism that marked the end of the nineteenth century." --Annales

Extraterritorial Dreams

Author: Sarah Abrevaya Stein
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022636836X
Size: 44.99 MB
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Extraterritorial Dreams from the Author: Sarah Abrevaya Stein. We tend to think of citizenship as something that is either offered or denied by a state. Modern history teaches otherwise. Reimagining citizenship as a legal spectrum along which individuals can travel, Extraterritorial Dreams explores the history of Ottoman Jews who sought, acquired, were denied or stripped of citizenship in Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries—as the Ottoman Empire retracted and new states were born—in order to ask larger questions about the nature of citizenship itself. Sarah Abrevaya Stein traces the experiences of Mediterranean Jewish women, men, and families who lived through a tumultuous series of wars, border changes, genocides, and mass migrations, all in the shadow of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the ascendance of the modern passport regime. Moving across vast stretches of Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas, she tells the intimate stories of people struggling to find a legal place in a world ever more divided by political boundaries and competing nationalist sentiments. From a poor youth who reached France as a stowaway only to be hunted by the Parisian police as a spy to a wealthy Baghdadi-born man in Shanghai who willed his fortune to his Eurasian Buddhist wife, Stein tells stories that illuminate the intertwined nature of minority histories and global politics through the turbulence of the modern era.

Jewish Questions

Author: Matt Goldish
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400829003
Size: 32.52 MB
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Jewish Questions from the Author: Matt Goldish. In Jewish Questions, Matt Goldish introduces English readers to the history and culture of the Sephardic dispersion through an exploration of forty-three responsa--questions about Jewish law that Jews asked leading rabbis, and the rabbis' responses. The questions along with their rabbinical decisions examine all aspects of Jewish life, including business, family, religious issues, and relations between Jews and non-Jews. Taken together, the responsa constitute an extremely rich source of information about the everyday lives of Sephardic Jews. The book looks at questions asked between 1492--when the Jews were expelled from Spain--and 1750. Originating from all over the Sephardic world, the responsa discuss such diverse topics as the rules of conduct for Ottoman Jewish sea traders, the trials of an ex-husband accused of a robbery, and the rights of a sexually abused wife. Goldish provides a sizeable introduction to the history of the Sephardic diaspora and the nature of responsa literature, as well as a bibliography, historical background for each question, and short biographies of the rabbis involved. Including cases from well-known communities such as Venice, Istanbul, and Saloniki, and lesser-known Jewish enclaves such as Kastoria, Ragusa, and Nablus, Jewish Questions provides a sense of how Sephardic communities were organized, how Jews related to their neighbors, what problems threatened them and their families, and how they understood their relationship to God and the Jewish people.

The Grandees

Author: Stephen Birmingham
Publisher: Syracuse University Press
ISBN: 9780815604594
Size: 32.12 MB
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The Grandees from the Author: Stephen Birmingham. Decendents of the original 23 Jewish families who arrived in New York in 1654, the Sephardic Jews began a tradition of wealth, pride and exclusiveness. This is the story over three centuries of power, achievement, scandal and folly, elegant lifestyles and flamboyant personalities.

Jews And Muslims

Author: Aron Rodrigue
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295983141
Size: 72.70 MB
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Jews And Muslims from the Author: Aron Rodrigue. "Jews and Muslims throws light on the history of these communities, focusing on the century before the end of Jewish life in Muslim areas. It interweaves analysis with translations of primary documents drawn from the archives of a French-Jewish organization, the Alliance Israelite Universelle, that had an extensive Jewish school network around the Mediterranean basin. It illuminates the political, socio-economic, and cultural changes that eroded the place of Jews in Middle Eastern societies and offers a unique perspective, from within, on the historical background of some of the most vexing problems of the modern Middle East."--BOOK JACKET.

A Drizzle Of Honey

Author: David M. Gitlitz
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1466824778
Size: 75.31 MB
Format: PDF
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A Drizzle Of Honey from the Author: David M. Gitlitz. When Iberian Jews were converted to Catholicism under duress during the Inquisition, many struggled to retain their Jewish identity in private while projecting Christian conformity in the public sphere. To root out these heretics, the courts of the Inquisition published checklists of koshering practices and "grilled" the servants, neighbors, and even the children of those suspected of practicing their religion at home. From these testimonies and other primary sources, Gitlitz & Davidson have drawn a fascinating, award-winning picture of this precarious sense of Jewish identity and have re-created these recipes, which combine Christian & Islamic traditions in cooking lamb, beef, fish, eggplant, chickpeas, and greens and use seasonings such as saffron, mace, ginger, and cinnamon. The recipes, and the accompanying stories of the people who created them, promise to delight the adventurous palate and give insights into the foundations of modern Sephardic cuisine.

A Jewish Voice From Ottoman Salonica

Author: Aron Rodrigue
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 080478177X
Size: 63.42 MB
Format: PDF
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A Jewish Voice From Ottoman Salonica from the Author: Aron Rodrigue. This book presents for the first time the complete text of the earliest known Ladino-language memoir, transliterated from the original script, translated into English, and introduced and explicated by the editors. The memoirist, Sa'adi Besalel a-Levi (1820–1903), wrote about Ottoman Jews' daily life at a time when the finely wrought fabric of Ottoman society was just beginning to unravel. His vivid portrayal of life in Salonica, a major port in the Ottoman Levant with a majority Jewish population, thus provides a unique window into a way of life before it disappeared as a result of profound political and social changes and the World Wars. Sa'adi was a prominent journalist and publisher, one of the most significant creators of modern Sephardic print culture. He was also a rebel who accused the Jewish leadership of Salonica of being corrupt, abusive, and fanatical; that leadership, in turn, excommunicated him from the Jewish community. The experience of excommunication pervades Sa'adi's memoir, which documents a world that its author was himself actively involved in changing.