Sephardi Lives

Author: Julia Philips Cohen
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804791910
Size: 30.83 MB
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Sephardi Lives from the Author: Julia Philips Cohen. This ground-breaking documentary history contains over 150 primary sources originally written in 15 languages by or about Sephardi Jews—descendants of Jews who fled medieval Spain and Portugal settling in the western portions of the Ottoman Empire, including the Balkans, Anatolia, and Palestine. Reflecting Sephardi history in all its diversity, from the courtyard to the courthouse, spheres intimate, political, commercial, familial, and religious, these documents show life within these distinctive Jewish communities as well as between Jews, Muslims, and Christians. Sephardi Lives offer readers an intimate view of how Sephardim experienced the major regional and world events of the modern era—natural disasters, violence and wars, the transition from empire to nation-states, and the Holocaust. This collection also provides a vivid exploration of the day-to-day lives of Sephardi women, men, boys, and girls in the Judeo-Spanish heartland of the Ottoman Balkans and Middle East, as well as the émigré centers Sephardim settled throughout the twentieth century, including North and South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe. The selections are of a vast range, including private letters from family collections, rabbinical writings, documents of state, memoirs and diaries, court records, selections from the popular press, and scholarship. In a single volume, Sephardi Lives preserves the cultural richness and historical complexity of a Sephardi world that is no more.

A Sephardi Life In Southeastern Europe

Author: Esther Benbassa
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295998571
Size: 54.97 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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A Sephardi Life In Southeastern Europe from the Author: Esther Benbassa. Autobiographical texts are rare in the Sephardi world. Gabriel Ari�s writings provide a special perspective on the political, economic, and cultural changes undergone by the Eastern Sephardi community in the decades before its dissolution, in regions where it had been constituted since the expulsion from Spain in 1492. His history is a fascinating memoir of the Sephardi and Levantine bourgeoisie of the time. For his entire life, Ari�teacher, historian, community leader, and businessman�was caught between East and West. Born in a small provincial town in Ottoman Bulgaria in 1863, he witnessed the disappearance of a social and political order that had lasted for centuries and its replacement by new ideas and new ways of life, which would irreversibly transform Jewish existence. A Sephardi Life in Southeastern Europe publishes in full the autobiography (covering the years 1863-1906) and journal (1906-39) of Gabriel Ari�, along with selections from his letters to the Alliance Isra�lite Universelle. An introduction by Esther Benbassa and Aron Rodrigue analyzes his life and examines the general and the Jewish contexts of the Levant at the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth centuries.

Sephardi Family Life In The Early Modern Diaspora

Author: Julia Rebollo Lieberman
Publisher: UPNE
ISBN: 1584659432
Size: 35.77 MB
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Sephardi Family Life In The Early Modern Diaspora from the Author: Julia Rebollo Lieberman. Groundbreaking essays on Sephardic Jewish families in the Ottoman Empire and Western Sephardic communities

Becoming Ottomans

Author: Julia Phillips Cohen
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199397554
Size: 80.43 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Becoming Ottomans from the Author: Julia Phillips Cohen. The Ottoman-Jewish story has long been told as a romance between Jews and the empire. The prevailing view is that Ottoman Jews were protected and privileged by imperial policies and in return offered their unflagging devotion to the imperial government over many centuries. In this book, Julia Phillips Cohen offers a corrective, arguing that Jewish leaders who promoted this vision were doing so in response to a series of reforms enacted by the nineteenth-century Ottoman state: the new equality they gained came with a new set of expectations. Ottoman subjects were suddenly to become imperial citizens, to consider their neighbors as brothers and their empire as a homeland. Becoming Ottomans is the first book to tell the story of Jewish political integration into a modern Islamic empire. It begins with the process set in motion by the imperial state reforms known as the Tanzimat, which spanned the years 1839-1876 and legally emancipated the non-Muslims of the empire. Four decades later the situation was difficult to recognize. By the close of the nineteenth century, Ottoman Muslims and Jews alike regularly referred to Jews as a model community, or millet-as a group whose leaders and members knew how to serve their state and were deeply engaged in Ottoman politics. The struggles of different Jewish individuals and groups to define the public face of their communities is underscored in their responses to a series of important historical events. Charting the dramatic reversal of Jews in the empire over a half-century, Becoming Ottomans offers new perspectives for understanding Jewish encounters with modernity and citizenship in a centralizing, modernizing Islamic state in an imperial, multi-faith landscape.

Judentum F R Christen

Author: Sina Rauschenbach
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter
ISBN: 3110261863
Size: 41.99 MB
Format: PDF
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Judentum F R Christen from the Author: Sina Rauschenbach. Menasseh ben Israel (1604-1657) was one of the most important Rabbis of the Early Modern Age in Europe. He became known primarily through his leading role in negotiating the readmission of the Jews to England. The England negotiations, however, were only the final chapter of a life-long program, which is fully examined in detail for the first time in this work. Menasseh is introduced as a Jewish scholar, who – despite all the success he achieved in the Christian world – also failed because his path between mediation and self-realization was understood only by a very few.

Sephardi Entrepreneurs In Jerusalem

Author: Joseph B. Glass
Publisher: Gefen Publishing House Ltd
ISBN: 9789652293961
Size: 43.61 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Sephardi Entrepreneurs In Jerusalem from the Author: Joseph B. Glass. Here is the fascinating story of one of Jerusalem's founding families. The Valeros established the first private bank in Israel. They owned considerable real estate in Jerusalem and its environs, as well as properties throughout the country, many of which they donated for the public's needs. Members of the elite Jerusalem Sephardic community, which peaked in the beginning of the twentieth century, the Valeros were extremely active in public life. The book also serves as a cultural study of the life of a family from the higher echelons of Jerusalem in the nineteenth and the first half of the twentieth centuries.

Sephardi And Mizrahi Jews In America

Author: Saba Soomekh
Publisher: Purdue University Press
ISBN: 1557537283
Size: 50.95 MB
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Sephardi And Mizrahi Jews In America from the Author: Saba Soomekh. Sephardi and Mizrahi Jews in America includes academics, artists, writers, and civic and religious leaders who contributed chapters focusing on the Sephardi and Mizrahi experience in America. Topics will address language, literature, art, diaspora identity, and civic and political engagement. When discussing identity in America, one contributor will review and explore the distinct philosophy and culture of classic Sephardic Judaism, and how that philosophy and culture represents a viable option for American Jews who seek a rich and meaningful medium through which to balance Jewish tradition and modernity. Another chapter will provide a historical perspective of Sephardi/Ashkenazi Diasporic tensions. Additionally, contributors will address the term Sephardi as a self-imposed, collective, ethnic designation that had to be learned and naturalizedand its parameters defined and negotiatedin the new context of the United States and in conversation with discussions about Sephardic identity across the globe. This volume also will look at the theme of literature, focusing on Egyptian and Iranian writers in the United States. Continuing with the Iranian Jewish community, contributors will discuss the historical and social genesis of Iranian-American Jewish participation and leadership in American civic, political, and Jewish affairs. Another chapter reviews how art is used to express Iranian Diaspora identity and nostalgia. The significance of language among Sephardi and Mizrahi communities is discussed. One chapter looks at the Ladino-speaking Sephardic Jewish population of Seattle, while another confronts the experience of Judeo-Spanish speakers in the United States and how they negotiate identity via the use of language. In addition, scholars will explore how Judeo-Spanish speakers engage in dialogue with one another from a century ago, and furthermore, how they use and modify their language when they find themselves in Spanish-speaking areas today.

Sephardi Jewish Argentine

Author: Adriana M. Brodsky
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 025302319X
Size: 41.19 MB
Format: PDF
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Sephardi Jewish Argentine from the Author: Adriana M. Brodsky. At the turn of the 20th century, Jews from North Africa and the Middle East were called Turcos ("Turks"), and they were seen as distinct from Ashkenazim, not even identified as Jews. Adriana M. Brodsky follows the history of Sephardim as they arrived in Argentina, created immigrant organizations, founded synagogues and cemeteries, and built strong ties with coreligionists around the country. She theorizes that fragmentation based on areas of origin gave way to the gradual construction of a single Sephardi identity, predicated both on Zionist identification (with the State of Israel) and "national" feelings (for Argentina), and that Sephardi Jews assumed leadership roles in national Jewish organizations once they integrated into the much larger Askenazi community. Rather than assume that Sephardi identity was fixed and unchanging, Brodsky highlights the strategic nature of this identity, constructed both from within the various Sephardi groups and from the outside, and reveals that Jewish identity must be understood as part of the process of becoming Argentine.

Sephardi Jewry

Author: Esther Benbassa
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520218222
Size: 20.41 MB
Format: PDF
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Sephardi Jewry from the Author: Esther Benbassa. Praise for the French edition: "The most complete and thorough historical synthesis ever written in a European language on the Jewish communities of the Balkans and Turkey."--Michel Abitbol, L'arche "A rich and too-little-known history that successfully avoids twin snares: the myth of the irreparable decadence of oriental Judaism and the myth of the lost golden age of Spain."--Alain Dieckhoff, Les Nouveaux Cahiers "The authors illuminate the variety of responses--between the poles of westernizing and holding onto tradition--offered by these Jewish societies of the Levantine Sephardi cultural area to the processes of modernization, as well as their startling receptivity to the new ideologies of zionism and socialism that marked the end of the nineteenth century." --Annales

A History Of Muslims Christians And Jews In The Middle East

Author: Heather J. Sharkey
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108155863
Size: 24.57 MB
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A History Of Muslims Christians And Jews In The Middle East from the Author: Heather J. Sharkey. Across centuries, the Islamic Middle East hosted large populations of Christians and Jews in addition to Muslims. Today, this diversity is mostly absent. In this book, Heather J. Sharkey examines the history that Muslims, Christians, and Jews once shared against the shifting backdrop of state policies. Focusing on the Ottoman Middle East before World War I, Sharkey offers a vivid and lively analysis of everyday social contacts, dress, music, food, bathing, and more, as they brought people together or pushed them apart. Historically, Islamic traditions of statecraft and law, which the Ottoman Empire maintained and adapted, treated Christians and Jews as protected subordinates to Muslims while prescribing limits to social mixing. Sharkey shows how, amid the pivotal changes of the modern era, efforts to simultaneously preserve and dismantle these hierarchies heightened tensions along religious lines and set the stage for the twentieth-century Middle East.