Sephardi Lives

Author: Julia Philips Cohen
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804791910
Size: 23.67 MB
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Sephardi Lives from the Author: Julia Philips Cohen. This ground-breaking documentary history contains over 150 primary sources originally written in 15 languages by or about Sephardi Jews—descendants of Jews who fled medieval Spain and Portugal settling in the western portions of the Ottoman Empire, including the Balkans, Anatolia, and Palestine. Reflecting Sephardi history in all its diversity, from the courtyard to the courthouse, spheres intimate, political, commercial, familial, and religious, these documents show life within these distinctive Jewish communities as well as between Jews, Muslims, and Christians. Sephardi Lives offer readers an intimate view of how Sephardim experienced the major regional and world events of the modern era—natural disasters, violence and wars, the transition from empire to nation-states, and the Holocaust. This collection also provides a vivid exploration of the day-to-day lives of Sephardi women, men, boys, and girls in the Judeo-Spanish heartland of the Ottoman Balkans and Middle East, as well as the émigré centers Sephardim settled throughout the twentieth century, including North and South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe. The selections are of a vast range, including private letters from family collections, rabbinical writings, documents of state, memoirs and diaries, court records, selections from the popular press, and scholarship. In a single volume, Sephardi Lives preserves the cultural richness and historical complexity of a Sephardi world that is no more.

Becoming Ottomans

Author: Julia Phillips Cohen
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199340404
Size: 48.93 MB
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Becoming Ottomans from the Author: Julia Phillips Cohen. Becoming Ottomans is the first book to tell the story of Jewish political integration into a modern Islamic empire. It follows the efforts of Sephardi Jews from Salonica to Izmir to Istanbul to become citizens of their state during the final half century of the Ottoman Empire's existence.

Sephardi Jewry

Author: Esther Benbassa
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520218222
Size: 54.12 MB
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Sephardi Jewry from the Author: Esther Benbassa. Praise for the French edition: "The most complete and thorough historical synthesis ever written in a European language on the Jewish communities of the Balkans and Turkey."--Michel Abitbol, L'arche "A rich and too-little-known history that successfully avoids twin snares: the myth of the irreparable decadence of oriental Judaism and the myth of the lost golden age of Spain."--Alain Dieckhoff, Les Nouveaux Cahiers "The authors illuminate the variety of responses--between the poles of westernizing and holding onto tradition--offered by these Jewish societies of the Levantine Sephardi cultural area to the processes of modernization, as well as their startling receptivity to the new ideologies of zionism and socialism that marked the end of the nineteenth century." --Annales

Sephardi And Mizrahi Jews In America

Author: Saba Soomekh
Publisher: Purdue University Press
ISBN: 1557537283
Size: 47.80 MB
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Sephardi And Mizrahi Jews In America from the Author: Saba Soomekh. Sephardi and Mizrahi Jews in America includes academics, artists, writers, and civic and religious leaders who contributed chapters focusing on the Sephardi and Mizrahi experience in America. Topics will address language, literature, art, diaspora identity, and civic and political engagement. When discussing identity in America, one contributor will review and explore the distinct philosophy and culture of classic Sephardic Judaism, and how that philosophy and culture represents a viable option for American Jews who seek a rich and meaningful medium through which to balance Jewish tradition and modernity. Another chapter will provide a historical perspective of Sephardi/Ashkenazi Diasporic tensions. Additionally, contributors will address the term Sephardi as a self-imposed, collective, ethnic designation that had to be learned and naturalizedand its parameters defined and negotiatedin the new context of the United States and in conversation with discussions about Sephardic identity across the globe. This volume also will look at the theme of literature, focusing on Egyptian and Iranian writers in the United States. Continuing with the Iranian Jewish community, contributors will discuss the historical and social genesis of Iranian-American Jewish participation and leadership in American civic, political, and Jewish affairs. Another chapter reviews how art is used to express Iranian Diaspora identity and nostalgia. The significance of language among Sephardi and Mizrahi communities is discussed. One chapter looks at the Ladino-speaking Sephardic Jewish population of Seattle, while another confronts the experience of Judeo-Spanish speakers in the United States and how they negotiate identity via the use of language. In addition, scholars will explore how Judeo-Spanish speakers engage in dialogue with one another from a century ago, and furthermore, how they use and modify their language when they find themselves in Spanish-speaking areas today.

The Beginnings Of Ladino Literature

Author: Olga Borovaya
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253025842
Size: 77.36 MB
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The Beginnings Of Ladino Literature from the Author: Olga Borovaya. Moses Almosnino (1518-1580), arguably the most famous Ottoman Sephardi writer and the only one who was known in Europe to both Jews and Christians, became renowned for his vernacular books that were admired by Ladino readers across many generations. While Almosnino's works were written in a style similar to contemporaneous Castilian, Olga Borovaya makes a strong argument for including them in the corpus of Ladino (Judeo-Spanish) literature. Borovaya suggests that the history of Ladino literature begins at least 200 years earlier than previously believed and that Ladino, like most other languages, had more than one functional style. With careful historical work, Borovaya establishes a new framework for thinking about Ladino language and literature and the early history of European print culture.

Extraterritorial Dreams

Author: Sarah Abrevaya Stein
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022636836X
Size: 15.96 MB
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Extraterritorial Dreams from the Author: Sarah Abrevaya Stein. We tend to think of citizenship as something that is either offered or denied by a state. Modern history teaches otherwise. Reimagining citizenship as a legal spectrum along which individuals can travel, Extraterritorial Dreams explores the history of Ottoman Jews who sought, acquired, were denied or stripped of citizenship in Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries—as the Ottoman Empire retracted and new states were born—in order to ask larger questions about the nature of citizenship itself. Sarah Abrevaya Stein traces the experiences of Mediterranean Jewish women, men, and families who lived through a tumultuous series of wars, border changes, genocides, and mass migrations, all in the shadow of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the ascendance of the modern passport regime. Moving across vast stretches of Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas, she tells the intimate stories of people struggling to find a legal place in a world ever more divided by political boundaries and competing nationalist sentiments. From a poor youth who reached France as a stowaway only to be hunted by the Parisian police as a spy to a wealthy Baghdadi-born man in Shanghai who willed his fortune to his Eurasian Buddhist wife, Stein tells stories that illuminate the intertwined nature of minority histories and global politics through the turbulence of the modern era.

A History Of Muslims Christians And Jews In The Middle East

Author: Heather J. Sharkey
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108155863
Size: 70.14 MB
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A History Of Muslims Christians And Jews In The Middle East from the Author: Heather J. Sharkey. Across centuries, the Islamic Middle East hosted large populations of Christians and Jews in addition to Muslims. Today, this diversity is mostly absent. In this book, Heather J. Sharkey examines the history that Muslims, Christians, and Jews once shared against the shifting backdrop of state policies. Focusing on the Ottoman Middle East before World War I, Sharkey offers a vivid and lively analysis of everyday social contacts, dress, music, food, bathing, and more, as they brought people together or pushed them apart. Historically, Islamic traditions of statecraft and law, which the Ottoman Empire maintained and adapted, treated Christians and Jews as protected subordinates to Muslims while prescribing limits to social mixing. Sharkey shows how, amid the pivotal changes of the modern era, efforts to simultaneously preserve and dismantle these hierarchies heightened tensions along religious lines and set the stage for the twentieth-century Middle East.

Jewish Women In Historical Perspective

Author: Judith Reesa Baskin
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814327135
Size: 39.60 MB
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Jewish Women In Historical Perspective from the Author: Judith Reesa Baskin. A collection of fully-revised and new essays that explore the richness of Jewish women's history.

Saharan Jews And The Fate Of French Algeria

Author: Sarah Abrevaya Stein
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022612388X
Size: 21.74 MB
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Saharan Jews And The Fate Of French Algeria from the Author: Sarah Abrevaya Stein. The history of Algerian Jews has thus far been viewed from the perspective of communities on the northern coast, who became, to some extent, beneficiaries of colonialism. But to the south, in the Sahara, Jews faced a harsher colonial treatment. In Saharan Jews and the Fate of French Algeria, Sarah Abrevaya Stein asks why the Jews of Algeria’s south were marginalized by French authorities, how they negotiated the sometimes brutal results, and what the reverberations have been in the postcolonial era. Drawing on materials from thirty archives across six countries, Stein tells the story of colonial imposition on a desert community that had lived and traveled in the Sahara for centuries. She paints an intriguing historical picture—of an ancient community, trans-Saharan commerce, desert labor camps during World War II, anthropologist spies, battles over oil, and the struggle for Algerian sovereignty. Writing colonialism and decolonization into Jewish history and Jews into the French Saharan one, Saharan Jews and the Fate of French Algeria is a fascinating exploration not of Jewish exceptionalism but of colonial power and its religious and cultural differentiations, which have indelibly shaped the modern world.

Dynamics Of Religion

Author: Christoph Bochinger
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
ISBN: 3110451107
Size: 66.96 MB
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Dynamics Of Religion from the Author: Christoph Bochinger. This volume addresses the dynamics of religions in the past and present. As such it also addresses the dynamics of the study of religion. Bringing together programmatic contributions and exemplary case studies, it focuses on the different fields of change, namely that of the individual as subject and object of religion, of community and society, of practices and discourses, and of the narratives of such developments.