Reporting Disasters

Author: Suzanne Franks
Publisher: Hurst
ISBN: 1849044945
Size: 52.77 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 4811
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Reporting Disasters from the Author: Suzanne Franks. The media reporting of the Ethiopian Famine in 1984-5 was an iconic news event. It is widely believed to have had an unprecedented impact, challenging perceptions of Africa and mobilising public opinion and philanthropic action in a dramatic new way. The contemporary international configuration of aid, media pressure, and official policy is still directly affected and sometimes distorted by what was--as this narrative shows--also an inaccurate and misleading story. In popular memory, the reporting of Ethiopia and the resulting humanitarian intervention were a great success. Yet alternative interpretations give a radically different picture of misleading journalism and an aid effort which did more harm than good. Using privileged access to BBC and Government archives, Reporting Disasters examines and reveals the internal factors which drove BBC news and offers a rare case study of how the media can affect public opinion and policymaking. It constructs the process that accounts for the immensity of the news event, following the response at the heart of government to the pressure of public opinion. And it shows that while the reporting and the altruistic festival that it produced triggered remarkable and identifiable changes, the on-going impact was not what the conventional account claims it to have been.

Reporting Disasters

Author: Suzanne Franks
Publisher: Hurst Publishers
ISBN: 1849042888
Size: 10.42 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 967
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Reporting Disasters from the Author: Suzanne Franks. The media reporting of the Ethiopian Famine in 1984-5 was an iconic news event. It is widely believed to have had an unprecedented impact, challenging perceptions of Africa and mobilising public opinion and philanthropic action in a dramatic new way. The contemporary international configuration of aid, media pressure, and official policy is still directly affected and sometimes distorted by what was––as this narrative shows––also an inaccurate and misleading story. In popular memory, the reporting of the Ethiopian famine and the resulting humanitarian intervention were a great success. Yet alternative interpretations give a radically different picture of misleading journalism and an aid effort which did more harm than good. Using privileged access to BBC and Government archives, Reporting Disasters examines and reveals the internal factors which drove BBC news and offers a rare case study of how the media can affect public opinion and policymaking. It constructs the process that accounts for the immensity of the news event, following the response at the heart of government to the pressure of public opinion. And it shows that, while the reporting and the altruistic festival that it produced triggered remarkable and identifiable changes, the ongoing impact was not what the conventional account claims it to have been.

Reporting Disaster On Deadline

Author: Kent Collins
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0805861661
Size: 49.36 MB
Format: PDF
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Reporting Disaster On Deadline from the Author: Kent Collins. This essential resource is among the first to focus specifically and comprehensively on journalistic coverage of disasters. It demonstrates the application of scholarship and theory to professional practice, and includes a crash book template with logistical and information-collection requirements. --

Sensationalism

Author: David B. Sachsman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351491474
Size: 58.56 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Sensationalism from the Author: David B. Sachsman. David B. Sachsman and David W. Bulla have gathered a colourful collection of essays exploring sensationalism in nineteenth-century newspaper reporting. The contributors analyse the role of sensationalism and tell the story of both the rise of the penny press in the 1830s and the careers of specific editors and reporters dedicated to this particular journalistic style.Divided into four sections, the first, titled "The Many Faces of Sensationalism," provides an eloquent Defense of yellow journalism, analyses the place of sensational pictures, and provides a detailed examination of the changes in reporting over a twenty-year span. The second part, "Mudslinging, Muckraking, Scandals, and Yellow Journalism," focuses on sensationalism and the American presidency as well as why journalistic muckraking came to fruition in the Progressive Era.The third section, "Murder, Mayhem, Stunts, Hoaxes, and Disasters," features a ground-breaking discussion of the place of religion and death in nineteenth-century newspapers. The final section explains the connection between sensationalism and hatred. This is a must-read book for any historian, journalist, or person interested in American culture.

Global Crisis Reporting

Author: Cottle, Simon
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)
ISBN: 0335221386
Size: 56.33 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Global Crisis Reporting from the Author: Cottle, Simon. From climate change to the global war on terror, from forced migration to humanitarian disasters - these are just some of the global crises addressed in this accessible, ground-breaking book. For the first time, the author examines how, why and to what extent these are diverse threats to humanity conveyed in today's news media.

Reporting On Risks

Author: Jim Willis
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9780275952983
Size: 73.66 MB
Format: PDF
View: 6806
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Reporting On Risks from the Author: Jim Willis. Up-to-date analysis of the issues surrounding health and safety risks including discussion about how journalists can more accurately depict health and medical news.

The Shock Doctrine

Author: Naomi Klein
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141980869
Size: 30.40 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The Shock Doctrine from the Author: Naomi Klein. Around the world in Britain, the United States, Asia and the Middle East, there are people with power who are cashing in on chaos; exploiting bloodshed and catastrophe to brutally remake our world in their image. They are the shock doctors. Thrilling and revelatory, The Shock Doctrine cracks open the secret history of our era. Exposing these global profiteers, Naomi Klein discovered information and connections that shocked even her about how comprehensively the shock doctors' beliefs now dominate our world - and how this domination has been achieved. Raking in billions out of the tsunami, plundering Russia, exploiting Iraq - this is the chilling tale of how a few are making a killing while more are getting killed.

Response To Disaster

Author: Henry W. Fischer
Publisher: University Press of America
ISBN: 9780761811831
Size: 33.62 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Response To Disaster from the Author: Henry W. Fischer. This edition of Response to Disaster provides an updated and more thorough version of the well-received 1994 first edition. The author adds new research and expands on areas only briefly developed in the first edition, which disseminated the original research findings from several disaster research studies completed by the author. He provides the reader with a basic understanding of how people and organizations usually respond to a disaster in contrast to how they are usually perceived to respond, as well as a description of how and why the mass media helps provide both accurate and inaccurate information involving disasters. In addition, the author discusses organizational response to disasters and assesses future needs in research to improve the reaction to them so that mitigation, planning, and disaster response activity are more effective. Here, he greatly expands the areas of theory of approaches to disaster.

Reporting On Risk

Author: Eleanor Singer
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
ISBN: 161044504X
Size: 32.96 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 7332
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Reporting On Risk from the Author: Eleanor Singer. After acts of airline terrorism, air travel tends to drop dramatically—yet Americans routinely pursue the far riskier business of driving cards, where accidents resulting in death or injury are much more likely to occur. Reporting on Risk argues that this selective concern with danger is powerfully shaped by the media, whose coverage of potentially hazardous events is governed more by a need to excite the public than to inform it. Singer and Endreny survey a wide range of print and electronic media to provide an unprecedented look at how hundreds of different hazards are presented to the public—from toxic waste and food poisoning to cigarette smoking, from transportation accidents to famine, and from experimental surgery to communicable diseases. Their investigations raise thought-provoking questions about what the media tell us about modern risks, which hazards are covered and which ignored, and how the media determine when hazards should be considered risky. Are natural hazards reported differently than man-made hazards? Is greater emphasis placed on the potential benefits or the potential drawbacks of complex new technologies? Are journalists more concerned with reporting on unproven cures or informing the public about preventative measures? Do newspapers differ from magazines and television in their risk reporting practices? Reporting on Risk investigates how the media place blame for disasters, and looks at how the reporting of risks has changed in the past twenty-five years as such hazards as nuclear power, birth control methods, and industrial by-products have grown in national prominence. The authors demonstrate that the media often fail to report on risks until energized by the occurrence of some disastrous or dramatic event—the Union Carbide pesticide leak in Bhopal, the Challenger explosion, the outbreak of famine in Somalia, or the failed transplant of a baboon heart to "Baby Fae." Sustained attention to these hazards depends less on whether the underlying issues have been resolved than on whether they continue to unfold in newsworthy events. Reporting on Risk examines the accuracy and the amount of information we receive about our environment. It offers a critical perspective on how our perceptions of risk, as shaped by the media, may contribute to misguided individual and public choices for action and prevention in an increasingly complex world. The authors' probing assessment of how the media report a vast array of risks offers insights useful to journalists, policy analysts, risk specialists, legislators, and concerned citizens.