New Directions In Ecofeminist Literary Criticism

Author: Andrea Campbell
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443809225
Size: 40.63 MB
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New Directions In Ecofeminist Literary Criticism from the Author: Andrea Campbell. As ecofeminism continues to gain attention from multiple academic discourses, the field of literary criticism has been especially affected by this philosophy/social movement. Scholars using ecofeminist literary criticism are making new and important arguments concerning literature across the spectrum and issues of environment, race, class, gender, sexuality, and other forms of oppression. The essays in New Directions in Ecofeminist Literary Criticism highlight the intersections of these oppressions through the works of different authors including Barbara Kingsolver, Ruth Ozeki, Linda Hogan and Flora Nwapa, and demonstrate the expansion of ecofeminist literary criticism to a more global scale as well as important connections with the field of environmental justice. This collection offers fresh insight and expands the important discussion surrounding the field of ecofeminism and literature.

New Essays In Ecofeminist Literary Criticism

Author: Glynis Carr
Publisher: Bucknell University Press
ISBN: 9780838754764
Size: 41.12 MB
Format: PDF
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New Essays In Ecofeminist Literary Criticism from the Author: Glynis Carr. This collection gathers new essays in ecofeminist literary criticism and theory that extend the critical trajectory of ecocriticism toward interdisciplinarity, multiculturalism, and internationalism in the context of social ecofeminist theory and practice. The volume focuses on several major issues: multiculturalism and issues of environmental justice, constructions of masculinity and heterosexuality, formation of communities of resistance, and questions of language and representation."

Feminist Ecocriticism

Author: Douglas A. Vakoch
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739176838
Size: 47.53 MB
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Feminist Ecocriticism from the Author: Douglas A. Vakoch. Feminist Ecocriticism examines the interplay of women and nature as seen through literary theory and criticism, drawing on insights from such diverse fields as chaos theory and psychoanalysis, while examining genres ranging from nineteenth-century sentimental literature to contemporary science fiction. The book explores the central claim of ecofeminism—that there is a connection between environmental degradation and the subordination of women—with the goal of identifying and fostering liberatory alternatives. Feminist Ecocriticism analyzes the work of such diverse women writers as Rachel Carson, Barbara Kingsolver, Ursula K. Le Guin, and Mary Shelley. By including chapters from a comparable number of women and men, this book dispels the notion that ecofeminism is relevant to and used by only female scholars. After uncovering the oppressive dichotomies of male/female and nature/culture that underlie contemporary environmental problems, Feminist Ecocriticism focuses specifically on emancipatory strategies employed by ecofeminist literary critics as antidotes, asking what our lives might be like as those strategies become increasingly successful in overcoming oppression. Thus, ecofeminism is not limited to the critique of literature, but also helps identify and articulate liberatory ideals that can be actualized in the real world, in the process transforming everyday life. Providing an alternative to rugged individualism, for example, ecofeminist literature promotes a more fulfilling sense of interrelationship with both community and the land. In the process of exploring literature from ecofeminist perspectives, the book reveals strategies of emancipation that have already begun to give rise to more hopeful ecological narratives. Feminist Ecocriticism provides a novel integration of two important strands of contemporary literary criticism that have often failed to make contact: feminist criticism and ecocriticism. The openness of both feminist criticism and ecocriticism to multiple, even incompatible perspectives, without the insistence on unitary definitions of their fields, has given rise to a new hybrid discipline: feminist ecocriticism.

Asian American Literature And The Environment

Author: Lorna Fitzsimmons
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134676719
Size: 54.43 MB
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Asian American Literature And The Environment from the Author: Lorna Fitzsimmons. This book is a ground-breaking transnational study of representations of the environment in Asian American literature. Extending and renewing Asian American studies and ecocriticism by drawing the two fields into deeper dialogue, it brings Asian American writers to the center of ecocritical studies. This collection demonstrates the distinctiveness of Asian American writers’ positions on topics of major concern today: environmental justice, identity and the land, war environments, consumption, urban environments, and the environment and creativity. Represented authors include Amy Tan, Maxine Hong Kingston, Ruth Ozeki, Ha Jin, Fae Myenne Ng, Le Ly Hayslip, Lan Cao, Mitsuye Yamada, Lawson Fusao Inada, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston, Milton Murayama, Don Lee, and Hisaye Yamamoto. These writers provide a range of perspectives on the historical, social, psychological, economic, philosophical, and aesthetic responses of Asian Americans to the environment conceived in relation to labor, racism, immigration, domesticity, global capitalism, relocation, pollution, violence, and religion. Contributors apply a diversity of critical frameworks, including critical radical race studies, counter-memory studies, ecofeminism, and geomantic criticism. The book presents a compelling and timely "green" perspective through which to understand key works of Asian American literature and leads the field of ecocriticism into neglected terrain.

Contesting Environmental Imaginaries

Author: Steven Hartman
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004335080
Size: 67.75 MB
Format: PDF
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Contesting Environmental Imaginaries from the Author: Steven Hartman. How is nature to be perceived and understood in a time of deepening environmental crisis? Papers collected here address this question from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and in a range of study areas, including Environmental History, Ecocriticism, Caribbean Studies, Scandinavian Studies, British and American Literature and Film Studies.

Ecofeminist Literary Criticism

Author: Greta Claire Gaard
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252067082
Size: 62.43 MB
Format: PDF
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Ecofeminist Literary Criticism from the Author: Greta Claire Gaard. Ecofeminism is a practical movement for social change that discerns interconnections among various forms of oppression: the exploitation of nature, the oppression of women, and racism. This anthology explores both how ecofeminism can enrich literary criticism and how literary criticism can contribute to ecofeminist theory and activism.

International Perspectives In Feminist Ecocriticism

Author: Greta Gaard
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134079591
Size: 49.24 MB
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International Perspectives In Feminist Ecocriticism from the Author: Greta Gaard. Exploring environmental literature from a feminist perspective, this volume presents a diversity of feminist ecocritical approaches to affirm the continuing contributions, relevance, and necessity of a feminist perspective in environmental literature, culture, and science. Feminist ecocriticism has a substantial history, with roots in second- and third-wave feminist literary criticism, women’s environmental writing and social change activisms, and eco-cultural critique, and yet both feminist and ecofeminist literary perspectives have been marginalized. The essays in this collection build on the belief that the repertoire of violence (conceptual and literal) toward nature and women comprising our daily lives must become central to our ecocritical discussions, and that basic literacy in theories about ethics are fundamental to these discussions. The book offers an international collection of scholarship that includes ecocritical theory, literary criticism, and ecocultural analyses, bringing a diversity of perspectives in terms of gender, sexuality, and race. Reconnecting with the histories of feminist and ecofeminist literary criticism, and utilizing new developments in postcolonial ecocriticism, animal studies, queer theory, feminist and gender studies, cross-cultural and international ecocriticism, this timely volume develops a continuing and international feminist ecocritical perspective on literature, language, and culture.

Fallen Forests

Author: Karen L. Kilcup
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820345717
Size: 64.61 MB
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Fallen Forests from the Author: Karen L. Kilcup. In 1844, Lydia Sigourney asserted, "Man's warfare on the trees is terrible." Like Sigourney many American women of her day engaged with such issues as sustainability, resource wars, globalization, voluntary simplicity, Christian ecology, and environmental justice. Illuminating the foundations for contemporary women's environmental writing, Fallen Forests shows how their nineteenth-century predecessors marshaled powerful affective, ethical, and spiritual resources to chastise, educate, and motivate readers to engage in positive social change. Fallen Forests contributes to scholarship in American women's writing, ecofeminism, ecocriticism, and feminist rhetoric, expanding the literary, historical, and theoretical grounds for some of today's most pressing environmental debates. Karen L. Kilcup rejects prior critical emphases on sentimentalism to show how women writers have drawn on their literary emotional intelligence to raise readers' consciousness about social and environmental issues. She also critiques ecocriticism's idealizing tendency, which has elided women's complicity in agendas that depart from today's environmental orthodoxies. Unlike previous ecocritical works, Fallen Forests includes marginalized texts by African American, Native American, Mexican American, working-class, and non-Protestant women. Kilcup also enlarges ecocriticism's genre foundations, showing how Cherokee oratory, travel writing, slave narrative, diary, polemic, sketches, novels, poetry, and expos intervene in important environmental debates.

Environmentality

Author: Roman Bartosch
Publisher: Rodopi
ISBN: 9401209340
Size: 16.37 MB
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Environmentality from the Author: Roman Bartosch. This book addresses the role and potential of literature in the process of contesting and re-evaluating concepts of nature and animality, describing one’s individual environment as the starting point for such negotiations. It employs the notion of the ‘literary event’ to discuss the specific literary quality of verbal art conceptualised as EnvironMentality. EnvironMentality is grounded on the understanding that fiction does not explain or second scientific and philosophical notions but that it poses a fundamental challenge to any form of knowledge manifesting in processes determined by the human capacity to think beyond a given hermeneutic situation. Bartosch foregrounds the dialectics of understanding the other by means of literary interpretation in ecocritical readings of novels by Amitav Ghosh, Zakes Mda, Yann Martel, Margaret Atwood and J.M. Coetzee, arguing that EnvironMentality helps us as readers of fiction to learn from the books we read that which can only be learned by means of reading: to “think like a mountain” (Aldo Leopold) and to know “what it is like to be a bat” (Thomas Nagel).

Animals And Desire In South African Fiction

Author: Jason D. Price
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319567268
Size: 26.97 MB
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Animals And Desire In South African Fiction from the Author: Jason D. Price. This book considers the political potential of affective experiences of desire as reflected in contemporary South African literature. Jason Price argues that definitions of desire deployed by capitalist and colonial culture maintain social inequality by managing relations to ensure a steady flow of capital and pleasure for the dominant classes, whereas affective encounters with animals reveal the nonhuman nature of desire, a biopower that, in its unpredictability, can frustrate regimes of management and control. Price wonders how animals’ different desires might enable new modes of thought to positively transform and resist the status quo. This book contends that South African literary works employ nonhuman desire and certain indigenous notions of desire to imagine a South Africa that can be markedly different from the past.