High Octane Fueled

Author: Rachel Cross
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1440584516
Size: 14.37 MB
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High Octane Fueled from the Author: Rachel Cross. Maddux Bates’s Formula One racecar isn’t the only thing that needs an overhaul this season. The Texan rebel’s bad boy behavior on and off-track last year won him the championship—and an image problem. Now he needs to keep his sponsors happy, his car on course, and his exploits out of the tabloids. Oncologist Brynn Douglas spent the last dozen years buried in school, patient charts, and research. But the reality of practicing medicine—at least at the prestigious Gates Institute—isn’t what she’d hoped. Then a seventy-year-old billionaire shows up in her office with an irresistible proposition: play the role of his girlfriend while secretly treating his blood cancer as they travel the F1 circuit. When their paths collide, Maddux quickly sets his sights on Brynn. He’s used to taking what he wants, but if the media catches him romancing a seemingly taken woman, the bad press might get him fired. One complicated relationship should be more than enough for Brynn, but every time she sees the sexy Texan, their attraction burns hotter. Falling in love on the F1 circuit is a crash course in adrenaline. Will Maddux and Brynn’s race to the finish end in a total blowout or total victory? Sensuality Level: Sensual

High Octane Fuel

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Size: 49.50 MB
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High Octane Fuel from the Author: . The Bioenergy Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy sponsored a scoping study to assess the potential of ethanol-based high octane fuel (HOF) to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. When the HOF blend is made with 25%-40% ethanol by volume, this energy efficiency improvement is potentially sufficient to offset the reduced vehicle range often associated with the decreased volumetric energy density of ethanol. The purpose of this study is to assess the ability of the fuel supply chain to accommodate more ethanol at fuel terminals. Fuel terminals are midstream in the transportation fuel supply chain and serve to store and distribute fuels to end users. While there are no technical issues to storing more ethanol at fuel terminals, there are several factors that could impact the ability to deploy more ethanol. The most significant of these issues include the availability of land to add more infrastructure and accommodate more truck traffic for ethanol deliveries as well as a lengthy permitting process to erect more tanks.

Well To Wheels Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis Of High Octane Fuels With Various Market Shares And Ethanol Blending Levels

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Well To Wheels Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis Of High Octane Fuels With Various Market Shares And Ethanol Blending Levels from the Author: . In this study, we evaluated the impacts of producing HOF with a RON of 100, using a range of ethanol blending levels (E10, E25, and E40), vehicle efficiency gains, and HOF market penetration scenarios (3.4% to 70%), on WTW petroleum use and GHG emissions. In particular, we conducted LP modeling of petroleum refineries to examine the impacts of different HOF production scenarios on petroleum refining energy use and GHG emissions. We compared two cases of HOF vehicle fuel economy gains of 5% and 10% in terms of MPGGE to baseline regular gasoline vehicles. We incorporated three key factors in GREET -- (1) refining energy intensities of gasoline components for the various ethanol blending options and market shares, (2) vehicle efficiency gains, and (3) upstream energy use and emissions associated with the production of different crude types and ethanol -- to compare the WTW GHG emissions of various HOF/vehicle scenarios with the business-as-usual baseline regular gasoline (87 AKI E10) pathway.

Effects Of High Octane Ethanol Blends On Four Legacy Flex Fuel Vehicles And A Turbocharged Gdi Vehicle

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Effects Of High Octane Ethanol Blends On Four Legacy Flex Fuel Vehicles And A Turbocharged Gdi Vehicle from the Author: . The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting engine and vehicle research to investigate the potential of high-octane fuels to improve fuel economy. Ethanol has very high research octane number (RON) and heat of vaporization (HoV), properties that make it an excellent spark ignition engine fuel. The prospects of increasing both the ethanol content and the octane number of the gasoline pool has the potential to enable improved fuel economy in future vehicles with downsized, downsped engines. This report describes a small study to explore the potential performance benefits of high octane ethanol blends in the legacy fleet. There are over 17 million flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs) on the road today in the United States, vehicles capable of using any fuel from E0 to E85. If a future high-octane blend for dedicated vehicles is on the horizon, the nation is faced with the classic chicken-and-egg dilemma. If today's FFVs can see a performance advantage with a high octane ethanol blend such as E25 or E30, then perhaps consumer demand for this fuel can serve as a bridge to future dedicated vehicles. Experiments were performed with four FFVs using a 10% ethanol fuel (E10) with 88 pump octane, and a market gasoline blended with ethanol to make a 30% by volume ethanol fuel (E30) with 94 pump octane. The research octane numbers were 92.4 for the E10 fuel and 100.7 for the E30 fuel. Two vehicles had gasoline direct injected (GDI) engines, and two featured port fuel injection (PFI). Significant wide open throttle (WOT) performance improvements were measured for three of the four FFVs, with one vehicle showing no change. Additionally, a conventional (non-FFV) vehicle with a small turbocharged direct-injected engine was tested with a regular grade of gasoline with no ethanol (E0) and a splash blend of this same fuel with 15% ethanol by volume (E15). RON was increased from 90.7 for the E0 to 97.8 for the E15 blend. Significant wide open throttle and thermal efficiency performance improvement was measured for this vehicle, which achieved near volumetric fuel economy parity on the aggressive US06 drive cycle, demonstrating the potential for improved fuel economy in forthcoming downsized, downsped engines with high-octane fuels.

How To Tune And Modify Motorcycle Engine Management Systems

Author: Tracy Martin
Publisher: MotorBooks International
ISBN: 0760340730
Size: 40.76 MB
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How To Tune And Modify Motorcycle Engine Management Systems from the Author: Tracy Martin. From electronic ignition to electronic fuel injection, slipper clutches to traction control, todayÂ’s motorcycles are made up of much more than an engine, frame, and two wheels. And, just as the bikes themselves have changed, so have the tools with which we tune them. How to Tune and Modify Motorcycle Engine Management Systems addresses all of a modern motorcycleÂ’s engine-control systems and tells you how to get the most out of todayÂ’s bikes. Topics covered include: How fuel injection works Aftermarket fuel injection systems Open-loop and closed-loop EFI systems Fuel injection products and services Tuning and troubleshooting Getting more power from your motorcycle engine Diagnostic tools Electronic throttle control (ETC) Knock control systems Modern fuels Interactive computer-controlled exhaust systems

High Octane

Author: Ashlinn Craven
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1440591792
Size: 52.59 MB
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High Octane from the Author: Ashlinn Craven. Everyone is fueled by something. Discover the dreams and demons that drive three sexy couples in the competitive world of Formula One racing. With enough twists and turns to keep even non-sports lovers speeding to the finish line, the High Octane series brings the heat both on and off the racetrack. Ignited: Sexy, daredevil British driver Ronan Hawes has no room in his life for anything but winning, until Cassidy Miller joins the world tour of Formula One racing. But she's got a secret that neither can outpace once the media gets on their trail. Fueled: Texan rebel Maddux Bates's bad behavior won him last year's championship - and an image problem. Getting caught dating a sponsor's girlfriend, oncologist Brynn Douglas, could sabotage this season too - but can anything slow this dynamic duo down when their relationship shifts into overdrive? Unleashed: The fans call Adam Fontaine "Mr. Spock," as this stoic engineer is the circuit's most reclusive driver. TV journalist Vivienne McCloud's first big assignment is to draw out Adam's secrets. When sparks fly between them, she finds far more than she bargained for - including a story that will threaten both of their careers. Sensuality Level: Sensual

Well To Wheels Greenhouse Gas Emission Analysis Of High Octane Fuels With Ethanol Blending

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Size: 21.69 MB
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Well To Wheels Greenhouse Gas Emission Analysis Of High Octane Fuels With Ethanol Blending from the Author: . Higher-octane gasoline can enable increases in an internal combustion engine's energy efficiency and a vehicle's fuel economy by allowing an increase in the engine compression ratio and/or by enabling downspeeding and downsizing. Producing high-octane fuel (HOF) with the current level of ethanol blending (E10) could increase the energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions intensity of the fuel product from refinery operations. Alternatively, increasing the ethanol blending level in final gasoline products could be a promising solution to HOF production because of the high octane rating and potentially low blended Reid vapor pressure (RVP) of ethanol at 25% and higher of the ethanol blending level by volume. In our previous HOF well-to-wheels (WTW) report (the so-called phase I report of the HOF WTW analysis), we conducted WTW analysis of HOF with different ethanol blending levels (i.e., E10, E25, and E40) and a range of vehicle efficiency gains with detailed petroleum refinery linear programming (LP) modeling by Jacobs Consultancy and showed that the overall WTW GHG emission changes associated with HOFVs were dominated by the positive impact associated with vehicle efficiency gains and ethanol blending levels, while the refining operations to produce gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (BOB) for various HOF blend levels had a much smaller impact on WTW GHG emissions (Han et al. 2015). The scope of the previous phase I study, however, was limited to evaluating PADDs 2 and 3 operation changes with various HOF market share scenarios and ethanol blending levels. Also, the study used three typical configuration models of refineries (cracking, light coking, and heavy coking) in each PADD, which may not be representative of the aggregate response of all refineries in each PADD to various ethanol blending levels and HOF market scenarios. Lastly, the phase I study assumed no new refinery expansion in the existing refineries, which limited E10 HOF production to the volume achievable by the cracking refinery configuration. To be able to satisfy large market demands of E10 HOF, that study arbitrarily relaxed the RVP requirements by replacing reformulated gasoline (RFG) RVP requirement of 7 psi in summer with conventional gasoline (CG) RVP requirement of 9 psi in summer. To examine the response by all refineries in major refinery regions, this phase II of the HOF WTW analysis employed regionally aggregated refinery models for the following six regions: PADDs 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 excluding California (CA) and CA separately. Using aggregate refinery models, this phase II study examined the impacts of ethanol blending and HOF market shares on the refinery operations in these six regions. Also, this study included refinery expansion to produce a pre-determined HOF volume with 10% ethanol blending. In particular, this study examined several refinery expansion options using refinery configuration models to investigate a practical refinery response to the increase in E10 HOF market demand.