Griffith Review 38

Author: Julianne Schultz
Publisher: Text Publishing
ISBN: 0987164899
Size: 36.85 MB
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Griffith Review 38 from the Author: Julianne Schultz. The Novella Project revives one of the richest and most rewarding literary forms. Novellas - longer than a short story, shorter than a novel - have come into their own, with the digital publishing revolution providing new opportunities for writers to experiment with longer stories that are intense, detailed, often grounded in the times, and perfectly designed for busy people to read in one sitting. This edition features six stories picked by a panel of judges from more than two hundred entries. Mary-Rose MacColl explores the rippling consequences of a single moment of distraction; Lyndel Caffrey poignantly recreates the bleak Melbourne winter of 1923; and Katerina Cosgrove combines a portrait of strife-torn Greece with a tale of tortured love. Ed Wright tells the tragic story of a spirited teenager torn between love and duty in wartime Japan; Christine Kearney embraces the complexities of the mythic and contemporary reality of life in East Timor; and Jim Hearn cooks up a challenging and gritty tale of a junkie in trouble. The Novella Project marks the beginning of an ongoing project, developed in collaboration with the Copyright Agency Limited's Cultural Fund, which we hope will help foster a new golden age for the novella with an antipodean perspective. Novella Project Judging Panel: Craig Munro Estelle Tang Julienne van Loon

Griffith Review 35

Author: Julianne Schultz
Publisher: Text Publishing
ISBN: 098716483X
Size: 60.25 MB
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Griffith Review 35 from the Author: Julianne Schultz. At times it feels like we are unwilling participants in a never-ending disaster movie, buffeted by natural catastrophe, war, economic collapse, social implosion and private trauma. But behind the shocking headlines, official inquiries and memorial ceremonies there are many stories of renewal and hope, of survivors who pick up the pieces and rebuild their lives and their communities. The brilliant writing in this edition of Griffith REVIEW takes you on a remarkable journey. The authors capture extraordinary battles and random brushes with fateā€”and live to tell the tale. And though surviving is a personal quest, there is also an opportunity to learn how to be better prepared: to adapt, survive, even thrive after disaster subsides. Surviving features new writing by some of Australia's leading authors, including Matthew Condon, Sophie Cunningham, David Francis, Michael Gawenda, Tom Griffiths, Ashley Hay, Ian Lowe, Kathy Marks, Sally Neighbour and New Zealand author Lloyd Jones.

Griffith Review 36

Author: Julianne Schultz
Publisher: Text Publishing
ISBN: 0987164856
Size: 24.26 MB
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Griffith Review 36 from the Author: Julianne Schultz. What is Australia For? asks the big questions to encourage a robust national discussion about a new Australian identity that reflects our national, regional and global roles. In a powerful memoir, Frank Moorhouse confronts his own mortality when a routine trek through the bush at the back of Bourke takes a wrong turn; Cameron Muir argues for an urgent marriage between health and agriculture; David Hansen investigates the token Aboriginality of a Melbourne residential tower; and Nick Bryant takes the temperature of our cultural cringe. Dennis Altman asks if Australians have lost the will to create a better society; Robyn Archer contends that sustainability and resilience must be at the heart of our national debate; Kim Mahood offers a lacerating account of white workers in remote Aboriginal communities; David Astle and Romy Ash deliver two outstanding pieces of short fiction. Other contributors include: Peter Mares, Leah Kaminsky, Jim Davidson, Frances Guo, Bruce Pascoe, Maria Papas, Pat Hoffie, Charlie Ward, Michael Wesley and more.

Griffith Review 30

Author: Julianne Schultz
Publisher: Text Publishing
ISBN: 0987079727
Size: 33.77 MB
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Griffith Review 30 from the Author: Julianne Schultz. As economic, political and cultural power moves from North America and Europe to the Asia-Pacific, Australia is enjoying a new relationship with its neighbours. The shift of individuals and ideas across borders is giving rise to new voices in literature. Griffith Review's highly regarded second annual fiction edition features sparkling short fiction by established and emerging writers from around the Pacific Rim and Australia who are engaging with the region, including Peter Temple, Janette Turner Hospital, Nick Earls, Eva Hornung, Kate Holden, Alice Pung and many more. Packed with great summer reading, this edition also includes the announcement of the 2010 winners of the Griffith Review Emerging Writers' Prize.

Griffith Review 42

Author: Julianne Schultz
Publisher: Text Publishing
ISBN: 098731355X
Size: 45.80 MB
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Griffith Review 42 from the Author: Julianne Schultz. Once upon a time - and the story begins. Wherever people go they carry their personal and cultural stories with them. Storytelling is a mechanism for reflecting on what it is to be human in time and space; a fairy tale compass to navigate the world. Whether relayed around campfires or told in multi-million-dollar extravaganzas on the big screen, the impulse to tell stories that help make sense of the world, engage with others, validate our existence, and guide us through life lessons, is something essentially human. Fairy tales endure because their messages still speak as strongly and clearly to people today as they ever did - hidden within the metaphoric codes of princes, witches, curses and towers, insurmountable tasks, elaborate tests and exaggerated trials. We all have the same dragons in our psyche, as Ursula K Le Guin once said. Fairy tales tell us it is possible to face these dragons, these ogres of our darkest imaginings, and triumph over them. Australia is a story as well as a place. The Aboriginal place was telling itself for at least those sixty-thousand years, while outside Australia existed only in the imaginations of people in the northern hemisphere, a Great South Land below the equator. The shocking, defining moment in 1788 when the First Fleet landed fractured the backbone of the story, and set off a whole galaxy of further plots and subplots that continue to play out. A country's living, dreaming imagination is a concept about which Australia's First Peoples know so much and speak so eloquently. We have inherited the stories of Europe, the tales of the brothers Grimm and the Bible that came in the memories and books of settlers over the past two hundred years, and we are increasingly integrating the stories of other cultures and civilisations in this region. In Once Upon a Time in Oz, Griffith REVIEW holds up an enchanted mirror to explore the role of fairy and folk tales across cultures in this country, and creates new ones. For many, coming to Australia meant leaving centuries of fairy tales, myths and legends behind and falling painfully onto the hard and naked ground. How did immigrants re-weave a cushion of stories encompassing the new narratives of place: the unforgiving harsh landscape; the lost or stolen child; the gods and goddesses of sport; the heroes of war; outlaws and larrikins and mateship; bushrangers and magic puddings? What are the tales that preoccupy, entertain and guide the culture today in the land of Oz? How did they make their way here? What has happened to them over time? Once Upon a Time in Oz presents new stories by renowned writers including Cate Kennedy, Arnold Zable, Ali Alizadeh, Tony Birch, Marion Halligan, Margo Lanagan and Bruce Pascoe. Other writers including Kate Forsyth, Michelle Law, Jane Sullivan, Lucy Sussex and John Bryson examine through essay and memoir some of the mysteries of storytelling. And David Rowe takes us 'Down the Abbott Hole' in a cartoon essay. Once Upon a Time in Oz features Carmel Bird as contributing editor. Julianne Schultz AM FAHA is the founding editor of Griffith REVIEW, Australia's most awarded and extracted quarterly, produced by Griffith University and Text Publishing. She is a professor in the Griffith Centre for Cultural Research, a member of the boards of the ABC and the Grattan Institute, and chair of the Australian Film Television and Radio School. Julianne is an acclaimed author, and in 2009 became a Member of the Order of Australia for services to journalism and the community.

Griffith Review 39

Author: Julianne Schultz
Publisher: Text Publishing
ISBN: 0987313525
Size: 56.15 MB
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Griffith Review 39 from the Author: Julianne Schultz. Kathy Marks' essay 'Channelling Mannalargenna', about the survival and sense of self among Tasmania's aboriginal population, won the 2013 Walkley Award for Indigenous Affairs. A ground-breaking and topical edition of Griffith REVIEW that will highlight rapid changes in Tasmania, past and present, by the state's best writers and thinkers. Tasmania, the smallest of Australia's states, has long been on the edge of national conversations about prosperity, equality and identity. In Tasmania: The Tipping Point? Griffith REVIEW serves up strategic slices of Tasmania's past, present and future, prepared by many of the state's best writers. Thinkers and doers from Tasmania and beyond, including members of its diaspora, examine whether the island state has reached a 'tipping point'. Geographic isolation, a distinctive natural environment and small social scale are increasingly seen as blessings, presenting remarkable opportunities. The arrival of David Walsh's block-busting Museum of Old and New Art in Hobart has inspired confidence in championing Tasmania as a cultural, economic, environmental and social test bed - despite some entrenched local resistance. Tasmania: The Tipping Point? challenges how Tasmania is seen by outsiders, and illuminates how Tasmanians see themselves, down home and in the world. (Published with the support of the University of Tasmania.)

Griffith Review 29

Author: Julianne Schultz
Publisher: Text Publishing
ISBN: 0987079700
Size: 28.63 MB
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Griffith Review 29 from the Author: Julianne Schultz. It is estimated that Australia's population will reach 36 million by 2050, stressing our cities, social cohesion and fragile ecosystems. Even for a country built on immigration, the continuing high rates of population growth are testing the consensus of national identity and demand a visionary approach to imagine a different future. Prosper or Perish explores the limits to growth and investigates ways to find a balance between growth, diversity and sustainability in a shrinking world. A major lead essay by award winning author and ABC presenter Peter Mares explores the tensions between a humanitarian and an environmental approach to migration and population, with a look at the emergence of an anti-growth movement and political party and an evaluation of how we measure economic growth and quality of life. Additional essays, memoir and reportage from Tom Griffiths, Brendan Gleeson, Anna Maria Dell'oso, Raymond Evans, and many more provide insight into the science and policy behind sustainability, plus stories and lives of immigrants, refugees and expatriates that fled to foreign lands and made their way to Australian shores.

Griffith Review 31

Author: Julianne Schultz
Publisher: Text Publishing
ISBN: 0987079743
Size: 60.97 MB
Format: PDF
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Griffith Review 31 from the Author: Julianne Schultz. The complexity and urgency of twenty-first century problems demand new Ways of Seeing. For decades, the humanities and social sciences have withered in the shadow of market economics and scientific rationalism. Now more than ever, we need a human-centred approach to the big dilemmas of the day, learning from literature and philosophy and drawing on the creative imagination. Philosopher and author John Armstrong argues that the value of humanities is measured by their worth and relevance outside the academy. Award-winning historian Peter Cochrane reveals the importance of historical imagination; Tanveer Ahmed explores neuroscience and policy; Leah Kaminsky reconnects the physician with the narrative. This edition also contains essays, memoir and fiction by Ian Lowe, Robyn Williams, Robert Hillman, Amanda Lohrey and Julienne van Loon, plus much more.

Griffith Review 34

Author: Julianne Schultz
Publisher: Text Publishing
ISBN: 0987164813
Size: 15.94 MB
Format: PDF
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Griffith Review 34 from the Author: Julianne Schultz. Griffith REVIEW's highly anticipated third annual fiction collection explores islands, both geographical and personal. This assortment of new fiction from the best emerging and established writers from Australia and the region promises a unique summer journey into localities of exclusivity, escape and enchantment. Island mentalities can delineate points of difference, uniting communities or separating individuals. The lure of islands has inspired and disappointed, from dreamy quests for utopia to the adventurers who reach new and troubling shores. This edition will surprise and delight, and will include the announcement of the 2011 winners of the Griffith REVIEW Emerging Writers' Prize. Previous Griffith REVIEW fiction issues have featured Peter Temple, Nikki Gemmell, Kate Grenville, Rodney Hall, Toni Jordan, Luke Davies, Kate Holden, Nick Earls, Eva Hornung and many other leading Australian authors.

Griffith Review Single Looking Back A Self Portrait

Author: Lloyd Jones
Publisher: Text Publishing
ISBN: 0987164805
Size: 34.46 MB
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Griffith Review Single Looking Back A Self Portrait from the Author: Lloyd Jones. Internationally acclaimed award-winning author Lloyd Jones looks back at how rugby shaped his childhood, his worldview and his adult sensibilities. From childhood games in the suburbs of Wellington, to a reverence for the mythical members of the All Blacks, rugby provided a vast and complex sense of place. Lloyd is best known for his novel Mister Pip which won the Commonwealth Writers' Prize and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. He is also known for the Book of Fame which is a fictionalized account of the All Blacks' 1905 trip to England, which rocketed the team to fame. This memoir originally appeared in Griffith REVIEW 33: Such Is Life.