Grading Smarter Not Harder

Author: Myron Dueck
Publisher: ASCD
ISBN: 1416618902
Size: 66.49 MB
Format: PDF
View: 6547
Download Read Online

Grading Smarter Not Harder from the Author: Myron Dueck. All the talk of closing the achievement gap in schools obscures a more fundamental issue: do the grades we assign to students truly reflect the extent of their learning? In this lively and eye-opening book, educator Myron Dueck reveals how many of the assessment policies that teachers adopt can actually prove detrimental to student motivation and achievement and shows how we can tailor policies to address what really matters: student understanding of content. In sharing lessons, anecdotes, and cautionary tales from his own experiences revamping assessment procedures in the classroom, Dueck offers a variety of practical strategies for ensuring that grades measure what students know without punishing them for factors outside their control; critically examining the fairness and effectiveness of grading homework assignments; designing and distributing unit plans that make assessment criteria crystal-clear to students; creating a flexible and modular retesting system so that students can improve their scores on individual sections of important tests. Grading Smarter, Not Harder is brimming with reproducible forms, templates, and real-life examples of grading solutions developed to allow students every opportunity to demonstrate their learning. Written with abundant humor and heart, this book is a must-read for all teachers who want their grades to contribute to, rather than hinder, their students' success.

Study Smarter Not Harder

Author: Kevin Paul
Publisher: Self-Counsel Press
ISBN: 177040712X
Size: 62.43 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2654
Download Read Online

Study Smarter Not Harder from the Author: Kevin Paul. By mastering the seven basic elements of complete study skills included in this book, it's possible to tap into hidden potential for maximum performance and increased learning power.

Rethinking Grading

Author: Cathy Vatterott
Publisher: ASCD
ISBN: 1416620524
Size: 69.30 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 6196
Download Read Online

Rethinking Grading from the Author: Cathy Vatterott. Grading systems often reward on-time task completion and penalize disorganization and bad behavior. Despite our best intentions, grades seem to reflect student compliance more than student learning and engagement. In the process, we inadvertently subvert the learning process. After careful research and years of experiences with grading as a teacher and a parent, Cathy Vatterott examines and debunks traditional practices and policies of grading in K–12 schools. She offers a new paradigm for standards-based grading that focuses on student mastery of content and gives concrete examples from elementary, middle, and high schools. Rethinking Grading will show all educators how standards-based grading can authentically reflect student progress and learning--and significantly improve both teaching and learning. Cathy Vatterott is an education professor and researcher at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, a former middle school teacher and principal, and a parent of a college graduate. She has learned from her workshops that “grading continues to be the most contentious part . . . conjuring up the most intense emotions and heated disagreements.” Vatterott is also the author of the book Rethinking Homework: Best Practices That Support Diverse Needs.

How We Learn

Author: Benedict Carey
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0812993896
Size: 18.18 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 3705
Download Read Online

How We Learn from the Author: Benedict Carey. In the tradition of The Power of Habit and Thinking, Fast and Slow comes a practical, playful, and endlessly fascinating guide to what we really know about learning and memory today—and how we can apply it to our own lives. From an early age, it is drilled into our heads: Restlessness, distraction, and ignorance are the enemies of success. We’re told that learning is all self-discipline, that we must confine ourselves to designated study areas, turn off the music, and maintain a strict ritual if we want to ace that test, memorize that presentation, or nail that piano recital. But what if almost everything we were told about learning is wrong? And what if there was a way to achieve more with less effort? In How We Learn, award-winning science reporter Benedict Carey sifts through decades of education research and landmark studies to uncover the truth about how our brains absorb and retain information. What he discovers is that, from the moment we are born, we are all learning quickly, efficiently, and automatically; but in our zeal to systematize the process we have ignored valuable, naturally enjoyable learning tools like forgetting, sleeping, and daydreaming. Is a dedicated desk in a quiet room really the best way to study? Can altering your routine improve your recall? Are there times when distraction is good? Is repetition necessary? Carey’s search for answers to these questions yields a wealth of strategies that make learning more a part of our everyday lives—and less of a chore. By road testing many of the counterintuitive techniques described in this book, Carey shows how we can flex the neural muscles that make deep learning possible. Along the way he reveals why teachers should give final exams on the first day of class, why it’s wise to interleave subjects and concepts when learning any new skill, and when it’s smarter to stay up late prepping for that presentation than to rise early for one last cram session. And if this requires some suspension of disbelief, that’s because the research defies what we’ve been told, throughout our lives, about how best to learn. The brain is not like a muscle, at least not in any straightforward sense. It is something else altogether, sensitive to mood, to timing, to circadian rhythms, as well as to location and environment. It doesn’t take orders well, to put it mildly. If the brain is a learning machine, then it is an eccentric one. In How We Learn, Benedict Carey shows us how to exploit its quirks to our advantage. Praise for How We Learn “This book is a revelation. I feel as if I’ve owned a brain for fifty-four years and only now discovered the operating manual.”—Mary Roach, bestselling author of Stiff and Gulp “A welcome rejoinder to the faddish notion that learning is all about the hours put in.”—The New York Times Book Review “A valuable, entertaining tool for educators, students and parents.”—Shelf Awareness “How We Learn is more than a new approach to learning; it is a guide to making the most out of life. Who wouldn’t be interested in that?”—Scientific American “I know of no other source that pulls together so much of what we know about the science of memory and couples it with practical, practicable advice.”—Daniel T. Willingham, professor of psychology at the University of Virginia From the Hardcover edition.

How To Create And Use Rubrics For Formative Assessment And Grading

Author: Susan M. Brookhart
Publisher: ASCD
ISBN: 1416615075
Size: 28.56 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 399
Download Read Online

How To Create And Use Rubrics For Formative Assessment And Grading from the Author: Susan M. Brookhart. What is a rubric? A rubric is a coherent set of criteria for student work that describes levels of performance quality. Sounds simple enough, right? Unfortunately, rubrics are commonly misunderstood and misused. The good news is that when rubrics are created and used correctly, they are strong tools that support and enhance classroom instruction and student learning. In this comprehensive guide, author Susan M. Brookhart identifies two essential components of effective rubrics: (1) criteria that relate to the learning (not the "tasks") that students are being asked to demonstrate and (2) clear descriptions of performance across a continuum of quality. She outlines the difference between various kinds of rubrics (for example, general versus task-specific, and analytic versus holistic), explains when using each type of rubric is appropriate, and highlights examples from all grade levels and assorted content areas. In addition, Brookhart addresses * Common misconceptions about rubrics; * Important differences between rubrics and other assessment tools such as checklists and rating scales, and when such alternatives can be useful; and * How to use rubrics for formative assessment and grading, including standards-based grading and report card grades. Intended for educators who are already familiar with rubrics as well as those who are not, this book is a complete resource for writing effective rubrics and for choosing wisely from among the many rubrics that are available on the Internet and from other sources. And it makes the case that rubrics, when used appropriately, can improve outcomes by helping teachers teach and helping students learn.

Elements Of Grading

Author: Douglas Reeves
Publisher: Solution Tree Press
ISBN: 1935543504
Size: 61.16 MB
Format: PDF
View: 762
Download Read Online

Elements Of Grading from the Author: Douglas Reeves. Effective teacher feedback is crucial to improving student achievement. The author provides educators with practical suggestions for making the grading process more fair, accurate, specific, and timely. In addition to examples and case studies, this edition offers a significant amount of new content, including an exploration of how the Common Core State Standards and new technologies impact grading practices.

Test Better Teach Better

Author: W. James Popham
Publisher: ASCD
ISBN: 0871206676
Size: 71.64 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 1702
Download Read Online

Test Better Teach Better from the Author: W. James Popham. Explains how to create and use tests to guide everyday teaching practices.

Grading From The Inside Out

Author: Tom Schimmer
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781936763856
Size: 46.42 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 5035
Download Read Online

Grading From The Inside Out from the Author: Tom Schimmer. Grading From the Inside Out by Tom Schimmer establishes that the time for grading reform is now. Traditional grading procedures are no longer applicable due to vast changes in pedagogy and assessment. While K12 teachers and administrators may feel hesitant about moving away from past practices or making profound changes in grading, and while it may be challenging, a change in mindset is essential for effective instruction and assessment. A standards-based mindset is needed to reshape the traditional grading paradigm. To help readers develop standards-based mindsets about grading, Schimmer proposes a grading paradigm based on a new approach to reporting student achievement. He then presents educators with steps they can actively take to positively alter grading and reporting in their classrooms.

Assessment And Student Success In A Differentiated Classroom

Author: Carol A. Tomlinson
Publisher: ASCD
ISBN: 1416617736
Size: 42.29 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 1357
Download Read Online

Assessment And Student Success In A Differentiated Classroom from the Author: Carol A. Tomlinson. Carol Ann Tomlinson and Tonya R. Moon take an in-depth look at assessment and show how differentiation can improve the process in all grade levels and subject areas. After discussing differentiation in general, the authors focus on how differentiation applies to various forms of assessment--pre-assessment, formative assessment, and summative assessment--and to grading and report cards. Readers learn how differentiation can --Capture student interest and increase motivation --Clarify teachers' understanding about what is most important to teach --Enhance students' and teachers' belief in student learning capacity; and --Help teachers understand their students' individual similarities and differences so they can reach more students, more effectively Throughout, Tomlinson and Moon emphasize the importance of maintaining a consistent focus on the essential knowledge, understandings, and skills that all students must acquire, no matter what their starting point. Detailed scenarios illustrate how assessment differentiation can occur in three realms (student readiness, interest, and learning style or preference) and how it can improve assessment validity and reliability and decrease errors and teacher bias. Grounded in research and the authors' teaching experience, Assessment and Student Success in a Differentiated Classroom outlines a common-sense approach that is both thoughtful and practical, and that empowers teachers and students to discover, strive for, and achieve their true potential.

Peer Feedback In The Classroom

Author: Starr Sackstein
Publisher: ASCD
ISBN: 1416623663
Size: 64.41 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 1949
Download Read Online

Peer Feedback In The Classroom from the Author: Starr Sackstein. In Peer Feedback in the Classroom, National Board Certified Teacher Starr Sackstein explores the powerful role peer feedback can play in learning and teaching. Peer feedback gives students control over their learning, increases their engagement and self-awareness as learners, and frees up the teacher to provide targeted support where it's needed. Drawing from the author's successful classroom practices, this compelling book will help you * Gain a deeper understanding of what meaningful feedback looks like and how it can be used as a tool for learning. * Establish a respectful, student-led learning environment that supports risk taking and honest sharing. * Teach students to be adept peer strategists who can pinpoint areas of needed growth and move forward with specific strategies for improvement. * Develop cooperative student expert groups to help sustain effective peer feedback throughout the year. * Use technology to enhance collaboration, streamline the learning and revision process, and strengthen students' digital citizenship skills. The book also includes extended reflections that express, in students' and teachers' own words, the approach's powerful effect on their practice. Invite students to be your partners in learning, and enrich your collective classroom experience.