The Global Seven Years War 1754 1763

Author: Daniel Baugh
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317895460
Size: 54.27 MB
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The Global Seven Years War 1754 1763 from the Author: Daniel Baugh. The Seven Years War was a global contest between the two superpowers of eighteenth century Europe, France and Britain. Winston Churchill called it “the first World War”. Neither side could afford to lose advantage in any part of the world, and the decisive battles of the war ranged from Fort Duquesne in what is now Pittsburgh to Minorca in the Mediterranean, from Bengal to Quèbec. By its end British power in North America and India had been consolidated and the foundations of Empire laid, yet at the time both sides saw it primarily as a struggle for security, power and influence within Europe. In this eagerly awaited study, Daniel Baugh, the world’s leading authority on eighteenth century maritime history looks at the war as it unfolded from the failure of Anglo-French negotiations over the Ohio territories in 1784 through the official declaration of war in 1756 to the treaty of Paris which formally ended hostilities between England and France in 1763. At each stage he examines the processes of decision-making on each side for what they can show us about the capabilities and efficiency of the two national governments and looks at what was involved not just in the military engagements themselves but in the complexities of sustaining campaigns so far from home. With its panoramic scope and use of telling detail this definitive account will be essential reading for anyone with an interest in military history or the history of eighteenth century Europe.

The Global Seven Years War 1754 1763

Author: Daniel A. Baugh
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317895452
Size: 44.64 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Global Seven Years War 1754 1763 from the Author: Daniel A. Baugh. The Seven Years War was a global contest between the two superpowers of eighteenth century Europe, France and Britain. Winston Churchill called it “the first World War”. Neither side could afford to lose advantage in any part of the world, and the decisive battles of the war ranged from Fort Duquesne in what is now Pittsburgh to Minorca in the Mediterranean, from Bengal to Quèbec. By its end British power in North America and India had been consolidated and the foundations of Empire laid, yet at the time both sides saw it primarily as a struggle for security, power and influence within Europe. In this eagerly awaited study, Daniel Baugh, the world’s leading authority on eighteenth century maritime history looks at the war as it unfolded from the failure of Anglo-French negotiations over the Ohio territories in 1784 through the official declaration of war in 1756 to the treaty of Paris which formally ended hostilities between England and France in 1763. At each stage he examines the processes of decision-making on each side for what they can show us about the capabilities and efficiency of the two national governments and looks at what was involved not just in the military engagements themselves but in the complexities of sustaining campaigns so far from home. With its panoramic scope and use of telling detail this definitive account will be essential reading for anyone with an interest in military history or the history of eighteenth century Europe.

The Global Seven Years War 1754 1763

Author: Daniel A. Baugh
Publisher: Prentice Hall
ISBN: 9780582092396
Size: 41.58 MB
Format: PDF
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The Global Seven Years War 1754 1763 from the Author: Daniel A. Baugh. The Seven Years War was a global contest between the two superpowers of eighteenth century Europe, France and Britain. Winston Churchill called it “the first World War”. Neither side could afford to lose advantage in any part of the world, and the decisive battles of the war ranged from Fort Duquesne in what is now Pittsburgh to Minorca in the Mediterranean, from Bengal to Quèbec. By its end British power in North America and India had been consolidated and the foundations of Empire laid, yet at the time both sides saw it primarily as a struggle for security, power and influence within Europe. In this eagerly awaited study, Daniel Baugh, the world’s leading authority on eighteenth century maritime history looks at the war as it unfolded from the failure of Anglo-French negotiations over the Ohio territories in 1784 through the official declaration of war in 1756 to the treaty of Paris which formally ended hostilities between England and France in 1763. At each stage he examines the processes of decision-making on each side for what they can show us about the capabilities and efficiency of the two national governments and looks at what was involved not just in the military engagements themselves but in the complexities of sustaining campaigns so far from home. With its panoramic scope and use of telling detail this definitive account will be essential reading for anyone with an interest in military history or the history of eighteenth century Europe.

Crucible Of War

Author: Fred Anderson
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307425398
Size: 57.41 MB
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Crucible Of War from the Author: Fred Anderson. In this engrossing narrative of the great military conflagration of the mid-eighteenth century, Fred Anderson transports us into the maelstrom of international rivalries. With the Seven Years' War, Great Britain decisively eliminated French power north of the Caribbean — and in the process destroyed an American diplomatic system in which Native Americans had long played a central, balancing role — permanently changing the political and cultural landscape of North America. Anderson skillfully reveals the clash of inherited perceptions the war created when it gave thousands of American colonists their first experience of real Englishmen and introduced them to the British cultural and class system. We see colonists who assumed that they were partners in the empire encountering British officers who regarded them as subordinates and who treated them accordingly. This laid the groundwork in shared experience for a common view of the world, of the empire, and of the men who had once been their masters. Thus, Anderson shows, the war taught George Washington and other provincials profound emotional lessons, as well as giving them practical instruction in how to be soldiers. Depicting the subsequent British efforts to reform the empire and American resistance — the riots of the Stamp Act crisis and the nearly simultaneous pan-Indian insurrection called Pontiac's Rebellion — as postwar developments rather than as an anticipation of the national independence that no one knew lay ahead (or even desired), Anderson re-creates the perspectives through which contemporaries saw events unfold while they tried to preserve imperial relationships. Interweaving stories of kings and imperial officers with those of Indians, traders, and the diverse colonial peoples, Anderson brings alive a chapter of our history that was shaped as much by individual choices and actions as by social, economic, and political forces.

Cultures In Conflict

Author: Warren R. Hofstra
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742551305
Size: 46.74 MB
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Cultures In Conflict from the Author: Warren R. Hofstra. Cultures in Conflict addresses the broad pattern of events that framed this conflict's causes, the intercultural dynamics of its conduct, and its profound impact on subsequent events—most notably the American Revolution and a protracted Anglo-Indian struggle for continental control. Warren R. Hofstra has gathered the best of contemporary scholarship on the war (1754–1763) and its social and cultural history. The authors examine the viewpoints of British and French imperial authorities, the issues motivating Indian nations in the Ohio Valley, the matter of why and how French colonists fought, the diplomatic and social world of Iroquois Indians, and the responses of British colonists to the conflict. The result of these efforts is a dynamic historical approach in which cultural context provides a rationale for the well-established military and political narrative of the Seven Years' War.

Empires At War

Author: William M. Fowler
Publisher: D & M Publishers
ISBN: 1926706579
Size: 37.42 MB
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Empires At War from the Author: William M. Fowler. On September 13, 1759, after a daring and unexpected ascent up a steep bluff, Wolfe's English troops confronted Montcalm's French troops and Canadian irregulars on the Plains of Abraham. The battle that followed determined Canada's destiny, but it was only one of many confrontations on several continents in what historians consider the first global war. The central drama, the part of the conflict that took place in North America, has become known as the Seven Years' War. Empires at War captures the sweeping panorama of this first world war and the huge cast of characters who fought it. William Fowler's narrative is adept at describing the battles and portraying the important players on all sides, incorporating the perspectives of the First Nations leaders and Canadian volunteers so critical to French initiatives throughout the war. Among the war's many outcomes were the ceding of Quebec to Britain and the final destruction of Acadia. The war was also waged in Europe, the West Indies, Asia, India and Africa. Before it ended, nearly 1,000,000 men had died.

The Seven Years War

Author: Matt Schumann
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134160682
Size: 78.48 MB
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The Seven Years War from the Author: Matt Schumann. The Seven Years War has been described as the first global conflict in history. It engulfed the Euro-Atlantic world from 1756 to 1763, and engaged the energies of European cabinets as never before. More than previous conflicts, the Seven Years War involved a variety of approaches to war, and taxed the military, material and moral resources of the powers involved. Drawing on a diverse array of archival, printed primary and secondary sources, The Seven Years War: A Transatlantic History covers the war’s origins, its conduct on land and at sea, its effects on logistics and finance, its interactions with domestic politics, its influence on international relations and its approach to peace. The book highlights the role of personality, alongside the enduring importance of communication, misperception and understanding. In so doing, it endeavours not merely to chronicle the war’s events, but to situate them in the context of mid-eighteenth century warfare, finance, politics and diplomacy. The Seven Years War will be of great interest to students of the European history, American history, maritime history, diplomatic and military history.

The Seven Years War

Author: Mark Danley
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 900423408X
Size: 41.57 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The Seven Years War from the Author: Mark Danley. In The Seven Years’ War: Global Views, Mark H. Danley, Patrick J. Speelman, and sixteen other contributors reach beyond traditional approaches to the conflict. Chapters cover previously-understudied aspects of the war in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Western Hemisphere.

The Seven Years War

Author:
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004236449
Size: 60.96 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The Seven Years War from the Author: . In The Seven Years’ War: Global Views, Mark H. Danley, Patrick J. Speelman, and sixteen other contributors reach beyond traditional approaches to the conflict. Chapters cover previously-understudied aspects of the war in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Western Hemisphere.

Prussia And The Seven Years War 1756 1763

Author: Johann Wilhelm Von Archenholz
Publisher: Leonaur Limited
ISBN: 9781782825340
Size: 32.24 MB
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Prussia And The Seven Years War 1756 1763 from the Author: Johann Wilhelm Von Archenholz. Frederick the Great's struggles during the Seven Years War The Seven Years War, 1754-62, shaped the modern world. It was a truly global conflict fought in India, America and Europe, as Britain struggled for dominance in trade, colonisation and culture with its principal rival, Bourbon France. European nations formed alliances dependent on need, sentiment or necessity in their relationships with the great powers. The German states of varying sizes and influence were subject to dominant neighbours, and Prussia despite her relatively large size remained surrounded by substantially more powerful and hostile states including Russia, Sweden, Austria and France. Prussia's monarch, Frederick, earned his epithet 'the Great' as much for his tenacity and ability to avert national defeat as for his skill as a strategist and battlefield tactician. This book, written by one of Frederick's own officers combines first hand, eyewitness experience with an historical narrative of Prussia's struggle to assert itself as a major power in Europe. Detail of campaigns, battles and anecdotes of major and minor characters from the perspective of a Prussian military man combine to deliver a rewarding book for modern readers. This edition offers an unparalleled and immediate account of these momentous times as Frederick fought for survival and, by example, laid the foundations for a unified Germany. Includes useful maps. Leonaur editions are newly typeset and are not facsimiles; each title is available in softcover and hardback with dustjacket; our hardbacks are cloth bound and feature gold foil lettering on their spines and fabric head and tail bands.