Full Of Hope And Fear

Author: Margaret Bonfiglioli
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191016969
Size: 25.43 MB
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Full Of Hope And Fear from the Author: Margaret Bonfiglioli. The First World War has survived as part of our national memory in a way no previous war has ever done. This collection of letters - which lay untouched for almost ninety years - allows a unique glimpse into the war as experienced by one family at the time, transporting us back to an era which is now slipping tantalizingly out of living memory. The Slaters - the family at the heart of these letters - lived in Oxford. Like most families, they were both typical and unique. Gilbert, the father of the family, had been head of Ruskin College in Oxford, and during the war found work as the first Professor of Indian Economics in Madras. His wife, Violet, grew to detest the war and became an increasingly vocal pacifist as the slaughter continued. Owen, their eldest son, a schoolboy in 1914, was fighting in France by war's end. In the letters they wrote to each other and their friends at this time we see how the war increasingly impacted upon each of their lives and the life of the world around them - rationing, Violet's increasing involvement in radical politics, the deaths of friends, the fear of Zeppelin raids when in London, the endless discussions between Violet and Gilbert about how to keep their son out of the trenches - and the growth of Owen from schoolboy to soldier, serving as a junior officer on the Western Front. Above all, in their privacy and immediacy, their inconsistencies and false hopes, these letters bring us as near as we can ever be to understanding what people thought, feared, and hoped for during these momentous years.

100 Days Of Hope And Fear

Author: David Torrance
Publisher: Luath Press Ltd
ISBN: 191032437X
Size: 68.24 MB
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100 Days Of Hope And Fear from the Author: David Torrance. Was it simply a victory for fear over hope? How did the Better Together campaign come so close to losing it? How did the Yes campaign come so close to winning it? What can the people of Scotland - and other aspirant nations - learn from this seismic democratic event? Scotland’s independence referendum on 18 September 2014 was the most significant ballot in Scotland’s history. The 100 days up to 18 September was the official campaign period and the world’s media was watching. David Torrance was there throughout, in front of the cameras, on the radio, in the newspapers, at the debates and gatherings, privy to some of the behind-the-scenes manoeuvrings. A passionate federalist at heart, described disparagingly by the outgoing First Minister as ‘Tory-leaning’, Torrance made a valiant attempt to remain ‘professionally neutral’ throughout. His commentary and analysis as the campaign went through its many twists and turns was always insightful, if not always popular. 'Reading this diary back during the editing process it was clear that, like (Nate) Silver (the US polling guru whose view was that the Yes campaign had virtually no chance of victory), I got a lot of things wrong (including the likely margin of victory) but also many things broadly correct. At least I can plead, as journalists often do, that I was probably right at the time.' His diary is deliciously gossipy, entertainingly indiscreet, and a must-read for political geeks as well as those who want to see what goes on behind the scenes of Scotland's politics and media. STEPHEN DAISLEY, STV David Torrance has emerged as one of the campaign's most important commentators... [his] unauthorised biography of Alex Salmond, Against the Odds, has become the prescribed text for the flying columns of English-based and overseas journalists converging on Scotland in this our hour of destiny. KEVIN McKENNA, Scottish Review of Books Torrance has secured himself a prominent position in the referendum debate, partly through the strategic use of nice jumpers and expertly crafted hair, but largely on merit … [he deserves] far better than the lazy impossibilist critiques to which [his federalist] proposals have been subjected. RORY SCOTHORNE on Britain Rebooted F*** sake... David Torrance on again. Is the greasy weasel never aff the telly? CALUM FINDLAY [on Twitter]

Savage Peace

Author: Ann Hagedorn
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781416539711
Size: 35.88 MB
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Savage Peace from the Author: Ann Hagedorn. Written with the sweep of an epic novel and grounded in extensive research into contemporary documents, Savage Peace is a striking portrait of American democracy under stress. It is the surprising story of America in the year 1919. In the aftermath of an unprecedented worldwide war and a flu pandemic, Americans began the year full of hope, expecting to reap the benefits of peace. But instead, the fear of terrorism filled their days. Bolshevism was the new menace, and the federal government, utilizing a vast network of domestic spies, began to watch anyone deemed suspicious. A young lawyer named J. Edgar Hoover headed a brand-new intelligence division of the Bureau of Investigation (later to become the FBI). Bombs exploded on the doorstep of the attorney general's home in Washington, D.C., and thirty-six parcels containing bombs were discovered at post offices across the country. Poet and journalist Carl Sandburg, recently returned from abroad with a trunk full of Bolshevik literature, was detained in New York, his trunk seized. A twenty-one-year-old Russian girl living in New York was sentenced to fifteen years in prison for protesting U.S. intervention in Arctic Russia, where thousands of American soldiers remained after the Armistice, ostensibly to guard supplies but in reality to join a British force meant to be a warning to the new Bolshevik government. In 1919, wartime legislation intended to curb criticism of the government was extended and even strengthened. Labor strife was a daily occurrence. And decorated African-American soldiers, returning home to claim the democracy for which they had risked their lives, were badly disappointed. Lynchings continued, race riots would erupt in twenty-six cities before the year ended, and secret agents from the government's "Negro Subversion" unit routinely shadowed outspoken African-Americans. Adding a vivid human drama to the greater historical narrative, Savage Peace brings 1919 alive through the people who played a major role in making the year so remarkable. Among them are William Monroe Trotter, who tried to put democracy for African-Americans on the agenda at the Paris peace talks; Supreme Court associate justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., who struggled to find a balance between free speech and legitimate government restrictions for reasons of national security, producing a memorable decision for the future of free speech in America; and journalist Ray Stannard Baker, confidant of President Woodrow Wilson, who watched carefully as Wilson's idealism crumbled and wrote the best accounts we have of the president's frustration and disappointment. Weaving together the stories of a panoramic cast of characters, from Albert Einstein to Helen Keller, Ann Hagedorn brilliantly illuminates America at a pivotal moment.

Mirandola

Author: Barry Cornwall
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 38.60 MB
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Mirandola from the Author: Barry Cornwall.

Writing In Hope And Fear

Author: John McLaren
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521567565
Size: 22.16 MB
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Writing In Hope And Fear from the Author: John McLaren. A compelling critical and historical account of politics in postwar Australian literary culture.

The Political Economy Of Hope And Fear

Author: Marcellus William Andrews
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814705200
Size: 16.51 MB
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The Political Economy Of Hope And Fear from the Author: Marcellus William Andrews. Popular liberal writing on race has relied on appeals to the value of "diversity" and the fading memory of the Civil Rights movement to counter the aggressive conservative assault on liberal racial reform generally, and on black well-being, in particular. Yet appeals to fairness and justice, no matter how heartfelt, are bound to fail, Marcellus Andrews argues, since the economic foundations of the Civil Rights movement have been destroyed by the combined forces of globalization, technology, and tight government budgets. The Political Economy of Hope and Fear fills an important intellectual gap in writing on race by developing a hard-nosed economic analysis of the links between competitive capitalism, racial hostility, and persistent racial inequality in post-Civil Rights America. Andrews speaks to the anger and frustration that blacks feel in the face of the nation's abandonment of racial equality as a worthy objective by showing how the considerable difficulties that black Americans face are related to fundamental changes in the economic fortunes of the U.S. The Political Economy of Hope and Fear is an economist's plea for unsentimental thinking on matters of race to replace the mixture of liberal hand wringing and conservative mythmaking that currently passes for serious analysis about the nation's racial predicament.