Contemporary Authors 1945 To The Present

Author: Britannica Educational Publishing
Publisher: Britanncia Educational Publishing
ISBN: 1622750152
Size: 73.33 MB
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Contemporary Authors 1945 To The Present from the Author: Britannica Educational Publishing. Contemporary literature encompasses so many genres, literary forms, and themes that it would seem almost impossible to identify a unifying thread between them. Yet in the tradition established by literary heavyweights who came before, modern writers of all stripes and backgrounds have continued to entertain and to confront the social, cultural, and psychological realities of the times—including everything from racial identity to war to technology—with their own flair and insight. The diversity of authors profiled herein—from Toni Morrison to Sylvia Plath to Stephen King to David Foster Wallace—attests to the scope and complexity of modern society.

A History Of The Popes

Author: John W. O'Malley
Publisher: Government Institutes
ISBN: 9781580512299
Size: 32.15 MB
Format: PDF
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A History Of The Popes from the Author: John W. O'Malley. A History of the Popes tells the story of the oldest living institution in the Western world—the papacy. From its origins in Saint Peter, Jesus' chief disciple, through Pope Benedict XVI today, the popes have been key players in virtually all of the great dramas of the western world in the last two thousand years. Acclaimed church historian John W. O'Malley's engaging narrative examines the 265 individuals who have claimed to be Peter's successors. Rather than describe each pope one by one, the book focuses on the popes that shaped pivotal moments in both church and world history. The author does not shy away from controversies in the church, and includes legends like Pope Joan and a comprehensive list of popes and antipopes to help readers get a full picture of the papacy. This simultaneously reverent yet critical book will appeal to readers interested in both religion and history as it chronicles the saints and sinners who have led the Roman Catholic Church over the past 2000 years. The author draws from his popular audio CD lecture series on the topic, 2,000 Years of Papal History, available through Now You Know Media (www.nowyouknowmedia.com).

Voice Of An Exiled Tibetan

Author: Yeshe Choesang
Publisher: Yeshe Choesang
ISBN: 8192698882
Size: 11.63 MB
Format: PDF
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Voice Of An Exiled Tibetan from the Author: Yeshe Choesang . This book is about the abuses of human rights in Tibet include restricted freedom of religion, culture, language, belief, and association. Particularly, Tibetans have faced arbitrary arrest and maltreatment in custody, including torture at the hands of Chinese authorities. Freedom of the Press in the China is still absent, and Tibet’s media is tightly controlled by the Chinese leadership, making it difficult to determine accurately the scope of human rights abuses. Today, China sees the Tibetan religion and culture as the main threat to the leadership of the Communist Party. Cover photo: After China’s 65-year-long brutal repression of the Tibetan people, Tibet is still an occupied territory and Tibetans live under constant military and police surveillance.

Culture In Dark Times

Author: Jost Hermand
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1782383859
Size: 41.65 MB
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Culture In Dark Times from the Author: Jost Hermand. BETWEEN 1933 AND 1945 MEMBERS OF THREE GROUPS-THE Nazi fascists, Inner Emigration, and Exiles-fought with equal fervor over who could definitively claim to represent the authentically "great German culture," as it was culture that imparted real value to both the state and the individual. But when authorities made pronouncements about "culture" were they really talking about high art? This book analyzes the highly complex interconnections among the cultural-political concepts of these various ideological groups and asks why the most artistically ambitious art forms were viewed as politically important by all cultured (or even semi-cultured) Germans in the period from 1933 to 1945, with their ownership the object of a bitter struggle between key figures in the Nazi fascist regime, representatives of Inner Emigration, and Germans driven out of the Third Reich.

Villages Of Britain

Author: Clive Aslet
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1408817993
Size: 52.44 MB
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Villages Of Britain from the Author: Clive Aslet. Villages of Britain is the history of the countryside, told through five hundred of its most noteworthy settlements. Many of Britain's villages are known for their loveliness, of course, but their role in shaping the nation over the centuries is relatively untold, drowned out by the metropolitan bias of history. A consummate storyteller, Clive Aslet deftly weaves the worlds of agriculture, politics, the arts, industry, folklore, science, ecology, fashion and religion into one irresistible volume. The Bedfordshire works that a century ago manufactured half a billion bricks a year; the Cheshire municipality striving to become the country's first carbon-neutral community; the Derbyshire estate where the cottages represent the gamut of European architecture; the Gloucestershire community founded by Tolstoyans, who still live by anarchic principles; the Leicestershire town where pub walls are embedded with Jurassic-era fossils; the Morayshire settlement where Hogmanay is celebrated eleven days late; the Pembrokeshire fishing hamlet that inspired Dylan Thomas; the Somerset village that was built on the back of the trade in Peruvian bird droppings; the Suffolk village that is rejecting modernity by reconstructing a windmill for grinding flour; the Surrey woodland that fosters Europe's most ancient trees - all these are places that have made a unique contribution to the narrative of this country. Follow Clive Aslet in visiting all five hundred villages, and you will have experienced the history of these islands from a uniquely rural perspective.

Irish Nationalists In America

Author: David Brundage
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199912777
Size: 56.31 MB
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Irish Nationalists In America from the Author: David Brundage. In this important work of deep learning and insight, David Brundage gives us the first full-scale history of Irish nationalists in the United States. Beginning with the brief exile of Theobald Wolfe Tone, founder of Irish republican nationalism, in Philadelphia on the eve of the bloody 1798 Irish rebellion, and concluding with the role of Bill Clinton's White House in the historic 1998 Good Friday Agreement in Northern Ireland, Brundage tells a story of more than two hundred years of Irish American (and American) activism in the cause of Ireland. The book, though, is far more than a narrative history of the movement. Brundage effectively weaves into his account a number of the analytical themes and perspectives that have transformed the study of nationalism over the last two decades. The most important of these perspectives is the "imagined" or "invented" character of nationalism. A second theme is the relationship of nationalism to the waves of global migration from the early nineteenth century to the present and, more precisely, the relationship of nationalist politics to the phenomenon of political exile. Finally, the work is concerned with Irish American nationalists' larger social and political vision, which sometimes expanded to embrace causes such as the abolition of slavery, women's rights, or freedom for British colonial subjects in India and Africa, and at other times narrowed, avoiding or rejecting such "extraneous" concerns and connections. All of these themes are placed within a thoroughly transnational framework that is one of the book's most important contributions. Irish nationalism in America emerges from these pages as a movement of great resonance and power. This is a work that will transform our understanding of the experience of one of America's largest immigrant groups and of the phenomenon of diasporic or "long-distance" nationalism more generally.

Camel Tracks

Author: Debra Boyd-Buggs
Publisher: Africa World Press
ISBN: 9780865437579
Size: 32.54 MB
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Camel Tracks from the Author: Debra Boyd-Buggs. In this new volume of critical essays on the Francophone literature of countries in the African Sahel, some of the field's most distinguished scholars investigate both the written and oral genres produced in this dynamic region - work characterised by its association with the desert. Revealing the richness and complexity of little-known texts, now becoming increasingly important as Africa forms its literary canon, this is the first volume of its kind available to researchers, teachers and students in the Anglophone world.

Simone Weil

Author: Thomas R. Nevin
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807863599
Size: 64.97 MB
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Simone Weil from the Author: Thomas R. Nevin. Over fifty years after her death, Simone Weil (1909-1943) remains one of the most searching religious inquirers and political thinkers of the twentieth century. Albert Camus said she had a "madness for truth." She rejected her Jewishness and developed a strong interest in Catholicism, although she never joined the Catholic church. Both an activist and a scholar, she constantly spoke out against injustice and aligned herself with workers, with the colonial poor in France, and with the opressed everywhere. She came to believe that suffering itself could be a way to unity with God, and her death at thirty-four has been recorded as suicide by starvation. This extraordinary study is primarily a topography of Weil's mind, but Thomas Nevin is persuaded that her thought is inextricably bound to her life and dramatic times. Thus, he not only addresses her thoughts and her prejudices but examines her reasons for entertaining them and gives them a historical focus. He claims that to Weil's generation the Spanish War, the Popular Front, the ascendance of Hitlerism, and the Vichy years were not mere backdrops but definitive events. Nevin explores in detail not only matters of continuing interest, such as Weil's leftist politics and her attempt to embrace Christianity, but also hitherto unexamined aspects of her life and work which permit a deeper understanding of her: her writings on science, her work as a poet and dramatist, and her selective friendships. The thread uniting these topics is her struggle to maintain her independence as a free thinker while resisting community such as Judaism could have offered her. Her intellectual struggles eloquently reveal the desperate isolation of Jews torn between the lure of assimilation and the tormented dignity of their communal history. Nevin's massive research draws on the full range of essays, notebooks, and fragments from the Simone Weil archives in Paris, many of which have never been translated or published. Originally published in 1991. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.