Disarming The Past

Author: Ana Cutter Patel
Publisher: Social Science Research
ISBN: 9780984125708
Size: 63.39 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Disarming The Past from the Author: Ana Cutter Patel. For the past twenty years, international donors have invested heavily in large-scale disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) programs, while, at the same time, transitional justice measures have proliferated, bringing truth, justice, and reparations to those recovering from state violence and civil war. Yet DDR programs are seldom deconstructed to discover whether they truly achieve their justice-related aims. Additionally, transitional justice mechanisms rarely articulate strategies for coordinating with DDR. Disarming the Past examines the connections—and failures—between these two initiatives within peacebuilding contexts and evaluates future links between DDR programs and the aims of transitional justice. The outcome of a substantial research project initiated by the International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ), this book is crucial for anyone interested in effective interventions and enduring outcomes.

Transitional Justice And Peacebuilding On The Ground

Author: Chandra Lekha Sriram
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415637597
Size: 21.16 MB
Format: PDF
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Transitional Justice And Peacebuilding On The Ground from the Author: Chandra Lekha Sriram. Présentation de l'éditeur : "This book seeks to refine our understanding of transitional justice and peacebuilding, and long-term security and reintegration challenges after violent conflicts. As recent events following political change during the so-called 'Arab Spring' demonstrate, demands for accountability often follow or attend conflict and political transition. While, traditionally, much literature and many practitioners highlighted tensions between peacebuilding and justice, recent research and practice demonstrates a turn away from the supposed 'peace vs justice' dilemma. This volume examines the complex, often contradictory but sometimes complementary relationship between peacebuilding and transitional justice through the lenses of the increased emphasis on victim-centred approaches to justice and the widespread practices of disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) of excombatants. While recent volumes have sought to address either DDR or victim-centred approaches to justice, none has sought to make connections between the two, much less to place them in the larger context of the increasing linkages between transitional justice and peacebuilding . This book will be of much interest to students of transitional justice, peacebuilding, human rights, war and conflict studies, security studies and IR."

Research Handbook On Transitional Justice

Author: D Jacobs
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing
ISBN: 178195531X
Size: 46.93 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Research Handbook On Transitional Justice from the Author: D Jacobs. Providing detailed and comprehensive coverage of the transitional justice field, this Research Handbook brings together leading scholars and practitioners to explore how societies deal with mass atrocities after periods of dictatorship or conflict. Situating the development of transitional justice in its historical context, social and political context, it analyses the legal instruments that have emerged.

Research Handbook On Disasters And International Law

Author: Susan C. Breau
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing
ISBN: 1784717401
Size: 76.86 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Research Handbook On Disasters And International Law from the Author: Susan C. Breau. International law’s role in governing disasters is undergoing a formative period in its development and reach, in parallel with concerted efforts by the international community to respond more effectively to the increasing number and intensity of disasters across the world. This Research Handbook examines a broad range of legal regimes directly and indirectly relevant to disaster prevention, mitigation and reconstruction across a spectrum of natural and manmade disasters, including armed conflict.

Child Soldiers As Agents Of War And Peace

Author: Leonie Steinl
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9462652015
Size: 18.82 MB
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Child Soldiers As Agents Of War And Peace from the Author: Leonie Steinl. This book deals with child soldiers’ involvement in crimes under international law.Child soldiers are often victims of grave human rights abuses, and yet, in some cases,they also participate actively in inflicting violence upon others. Nonetheless, theinternational discourse on child soldiers often tends to ignore the latter dimensionof children’s involvement in armed conflict and instead focuses exclusively on theirrole as victims. While it might seem as though the discourse is therefore beneficial for child soldiersas it protects them from blame and responsibility, it is important to realize that theso-called passive victim narrative entails various adverse consequences, which canhinder the successful reintegration of child soldiers into their families, communitiesand societies. This book aims to address this dilemma. First, the available optionsfor dealing with child soldiers’ participation in crimes under international law, suchas transitional justice and criminal justice, and their shortcomings are analyzed indepth. Subsequently a new approach is developed towards achieving accountabilityin a child-adequate way, which is called restorative transitional justice. This book is in the first place aimed at researchers with an interest in child soldiers,children and armed conflict, as well as international criminal law, transitional justice,juvenile justice, restorative justice, children’s rights, and international human rightslaw. Secondly, professionals working on issues of transitional justice, juvenile justice,international criminal law, children’s rights, and the reintegration of child soldierswill also find the subject matter of great relevance to their practice. Dr. Leonie Steinl, LL.M. (Columbia) is a Researcher and Lecturer at the Faculty of Lawof the Humboldt-Universität in Berlin.

Restorative Justice In Transition

Author: Kerry Clamp
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135076375
Size: 14.17 MB
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Restorative Justice In Transition from the Author: Kerry Clamp. This book explores how restorative justice is used and what its potential benefits are in situations where the state has been either explicitly or implicitly involved in human rights abuses. Restorative justice is increasingly becoming a popular mechanism to respond to crime in democratic settings and while there is a burgeoning literature on these contexts, there is less information that focuses explicitly on its use in nations that have experienced protracted periods of conflict and oppression. This book interrogates both macro and micro utilisations of restorative justice, including truth commissions, criminal justice reform and the development of initiatives by communities and other non-state actors. The central premise is that the primary potential of restorative justice in responding to international crime should be viewed in terms of the lessons that it provides for problem-solving, rather than its traditional role as a mechanism or process to respond to conflict. Four values are put forward that should frame any restorative approach – engagement, empowerment, reintegration and transformation. It is thought that these values provide enough space for local actors to devise their own culturally relevant processes to achieve longstanding peace. This book will be of interest to those conducting research in the fields of restorative justice, transitional justice as well as criminology in general.

Theorizing Transitional Justice

Author: Claudio Corradetti
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317010876
Size: 28.26 MB
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Theorizing Transitional Justice from the Author: Claudio Corradetti. This book addresses the theoretical underpinnings of the field of transitional justice, something that has hitherto been lacking both in study and practice. With the common goal of clarifying some of the theoretical profiles of transitional justice strategies, the study is organized along crucial intersections evaluating aspects connected to the genealogy, the nature, the scope and the most appropriate methodology for the study of transitional justice. The chapters also take up normative and political considerations pertaining to specific transitional instruments such as war crime tribunals, truth commissions, administrative purges, reparations, and historical commissions. Bringing together some of the most original writings from established experts as well as from promising young scholars in the field, the collection will be an essential resource for researchers, academics and policy-makers in Law, Philosophy, Politics, and Sociology.

Justice And Economic Violence In Transition

Author: Dustin N. Sharp
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461481724
Size: 53.85 MB
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Justice And Economic Violence In Transition from the Author: Dustin N. Sharp. ​​​​This book examines the role of economic violence (violations of economic and social rights, corruption, and plunder of natural resources) within the transitional justice agenda. Because economic violence often leads to conflict, is perpetrated during conflict, and continues afterwards as a legacy of conflict, a greater focus on economic and social rights issues in the transitional justice context is critical. One might add that insofar as transitional justice is increasingly seen as an instrument of peacebuilding rather than a simple political transition, focus on economic violence as the crucial “root cause” is key to preventing re-lapse into conflict. Recent increasing attention to economic issues by academics and truth commissions suggest this may be slowly changing, and that economic and social rights may represent the “next frontier” of transitional justice concerns. There remain difficult questions that have yet to be worked out at the level of theory, policy, and practice. Further scholarship in this regard is both timely, and necessary. This volume therefore presents an opportunity to fill an important gap. The project will bring together new papers by recognized and emerging scholars and policy experts in the field.​

Remaking Rwanda

Author: Scott Straus
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 0299282635
Size: 56.21 MB
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Remaking Rwanda from the Author: Scott Straus. In the mid-1990s, civil war and genocide ravaged Rwanda. Since then, the country’s new leadership has undertaken a highly ambitious effort to refashion Rwanda’s politics, economy, and society, and the country’s accomplishments have garnered widespread praise. Remaking Rwanda is the first book to examine Rwanda’s remarkable post-genocide recovery in a comprehensive and critical fashion. By paying close attention to memory politics, human rights, justice, foreign relations, land use, education, and other key social institutions and practices, this volume raises serious concerns about the depth and durability of the country’s reconstruction. Edited by Scott Straus and Lars Waldorf, Remaking Rwanda brings together experienced scholars and human rights professionals to offer a nuanced, historically informed picture of post-genocide Rwanda—one that reveals powerful continuities with the nation’s past and raises profound questions about its future. Best Special Interest Books, selected by the American Association of School Librarians Best Special Interest Books, selected by the Public Library Reviewers

Transitional Justice

Author: Rosemary Nagy
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814704972
Size: 57.95 MB
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Transitional Justice from the Author: Rosemary Nagy. Criminal tribunals, truth commissions, reparations, apologies and memorializations are the characteristic instruments in the transitional justice toolkit that can help societies transition from authoritarianism to democracy, from civil war to peace, and from state-sponsored extra-legal violence to a rights-respecting rule of law. Over the last several decades, their growing use has established transitional justice as a body of both theory and practice whose guiding norms and structures encompasses the range of institutional mechanisms by which societies address the wrongs committed by past regimes in order to lay the foundation for more legitimate political and legal order. In Transitional Justice, a group of leading scholars in philosophy, law, and political science settles some of the key theoretical debates over the meaning of transitional justice while opening up new ones. By engaging both theorists and empirical social scientists in debates over central categories of analysis in the study of transitional justice, it also illuminates the challenges of making strong empirical claims about the impact of transitional institutions. Contributors: Gary J. Bass, David Cohen, David Dyzenhaus, Pablo de Greiff, Leigh-Ashley Lipscomb, Monika Nalepa, Eric A. Posner, Debra Satz, Gopal Sreenivasan, Adrian Vermeule, and Jeremy Webber.