Ceramic Production In Early Hispanic California

Author: Russell K. Skowronek
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780813049816
Size: 61.23 MB
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Ceramic Production In Early Hispanic California from the Author: Russell K. Skowronek. The presidios, missions, and pueblos of both Spanish and Mexican California have provided a rich trove of ceramics materials; however, sparse analysis of the more remote areas of New Spain left an incomplete picture of economies. This volume rectifies this gap by examining the 18th and 19th century ceramic production in Alta California.

Setting The Table

Author: Kathryn Lee Ness
Publisher: University of Florida Press
ISBN: 9781683400042
Size: 24.86 MB
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Setting The Table from the Author: Kathryn Lee Ness. "A long-needed comparison between Spanish and Spanish colonial sites, showing how both inform us about Spanish identity at home and abroad."--Charles R. Ewen, coauthor of Hernando de Soto among the Apalachee "The first systematic attempt to consider the eighteenth-century archaeological record in Spain and measure it against the decades-long research in St. Augustine. It is long overdue and valuable."--Russell K. Skowronek, coauthor of Ceramic Production in Early Hispanic California: Craft, Economy, and Trade on the Frontier of New Spain Examining ceramics from eighteenth-century household sites in Jerez de la Frontera, Spain, and St. Augustine, Florida, Setting the Table opens up new interpretations of cultural exchange and identity in the early modern Spanish empire. To analyze and compare tableware from these far-removed locations, Kathryn Ness proposes and employs a new vessel-based classification system to bridge the differences between existing systems. Her findings show that on both sides of the Atlantic, similar major changes to dining practices and foodways developed at almost the same time. Ness argues that early modern people were creating and expressing a distinct Spanish-American identity that retained some traditions from the home country while welcoming new ideas from an increasingly global network. A volume in the Florida Museum of Natural History: Ripley P. Bullen Series

Seeking El Dorado

Author: Autry Museum of Western Heritage
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295980829
Size: 25.13 MB
Format: PDF
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Seeking El Dorado from the Author: Autry Museum of Western Heritage. Traces the history of African Americans in California

X Marks The Spot

Author: Russell K. Skowronek
Publisher: New Perspectives on Maritime H
ISBN:
Size: 63.21 MB
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X Marks The Spot from the Author: Russell K. Skowronek. "The first comprehensive, scholarly look at the artifactual evidence of real pirates, recovered at both shipwrecks and known pirate bases."--Archaeology Magazine "The reader unused to digesting professional publications will, pardon the pun, sail through this book as if it were a collection of novellas! Not only will he/she learn about the realities of trade in the Caribbean and politics in the time of pirates, but will be treated to the most interesting bits of ephemera such as an inventory of the legendary Captain Morgan's estate. This is the definitive book on Pirates and the research being done to dispel all of the fables."--Dirtbrothers.org "Articles in X Marks the Spot cover a wide range of pirate wrecks and legacies from the Golden Age of Piracy, and give the reader a glimpse into what might be the reality of pirate life and death."--Archaeology.about.com "A serious attempt to determine, through examination of both terrestrial and shipwreck sites, if pirates left such unambiguous traces in the archaeological record that their presence can be recognized in future excavations. Fascinating!"--George F. Bass, founder, Institute of Nautical Archaeology "Piracy occupies an adaptive niche dating back to the very beginnings of maritime enterprise. This volume reclaims that predacious profession from the realm of the unusual and the unique and presents it afresh as a persistent subsystem of normal commerce."--Thomas N. Layton, San Jose State University "Piracy is one of the world's oldest professions on the water. In this volume, a group of leading scholars literally digs into the subject to offer the first comprehensive archaeological look at pirates. . . . The definitive book on the archaeology of piracy."--James P. Delgado, executive director, Vancouver Maritime Museum "A most welcome contribution on the subject of piracy, one that has rarely been systematically addressed by archaeologists."--Barto Arnold, Institute of Nautical Archaeology, Texas A&M University This collection piques the imagination with historical evidence about the actual exploits of pirates as revealed in the archaeological record. The recent discovery of the wreck of Blackbeard's Queen Anne's Revenge, off Beaufort Inlet, North Carolina, has provoked scientists to ask, What is a pirate? Were pirates sea-going terrorists, lawless rogues who plundered, smuggled, and illegally transported slaves, or legitimate corsairs and privateers? Highlighting such pirate vessels as the Speaker, which sailed in the Indian Ocean, and the Whydah, the first pirate ship discovered in North America (near the tip of Cape Cod), the contributors analyze what constitutes a pirate ship and how it is different from a contemporary merchant or naval vessel. Examining excavated underwater "treasure sites" and terrestrial pirate lairs found off the coast of Madagascar, throughout the Caribbean, and within the United States, the authors explore the romanticized "Golden Age of Piracy," a period brimming with the real-life exploits of Captain Kidd, Blackbeard, Henry Morgan, and the "gentleman pirate" Jean Lafitte. This book will appeal to the general public, with special interest to anthropologists, archaeologists, historians, and divers.

Indians Missionaries And Merchants

Author: Kent Lightfoot
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520940352
Size: 20.41 MB
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Indians Missionaries And Merchants from the Author: Kent Lightfoot. California’s earliest European colonists—Russian merchants and Spanish missionaries—depended heavily on Native Americans for labor to build and maintain their colonies, but they did so in very different ways. This richly detailed book brings together disparate skeins of the past—including little-known oral histories, native texts, ethnohistory, and archaeological excavations—to present a vivid new view of how native cultures fared under these two colonial systems. Kent Lightfoot’s innovative work, which incorporates the holistic methods of historical anthropology, explores the surprising ramifications of these long-ago encounters for the present-day political status of native people in California. Lightfoot weaves the results of his own significant archaeological research at Fort Ross, a major Russian mercantile colony, into a cross-cultural comparison, showing how these two colonial ventures—one primarily mercantile and one primarily religious—contributed to the development of new kinds of native identities, social forms, and tribal relationships. His lively account includes personal anecdotes from the field and a provocative discussion of the role played by early ethnographers, such as Alfred Kroeber, in influencing which tribes would eventually receive federal recognition. Indians, Missionaries, and Merchants takes a fascinating, yet troubling, look at California’s past and its role in shaping the state today.

Trees In Paradise A California History

Author: Jared Farmer
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393078027
Size: 32.11 MB
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Trees In Paradise A California History from the Author: Jared Farmer. Traces the history of such iconic Californian vegetation as orange trees, giant redwoods, and palm trees, including the impact the vegetation had on the people living and working in the state.

Italian Ceramics

Author: Catherine Hess
Publisher: Getty Center for Education in
ISBN:
Size: 48.93 MB
Format: PDF
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Italian Ceramics from the Author: Catherine Hess. Italian Ceramics amplifies and updates the earlier volume, including objects - some of them porcelain and terra-cotta - acquired during the intervening years. Among them are a pair of eighteenth-century candlesticks representing mythological scenes and a tabletop with hunting scenes; and, from the 1790s, the beautifully modeled and painted Saint Joseph with the Christ Child. Italian Ceramics contains the most recent scientific, historical, and iconographic information about the Museum's holdings. Completely revised and expanded, this book offers a wealth of new information about the Getty Museum's superb collection, which spans more than four centuries of Italian ceramic art. With a historical introduction and individual commentaries by Catherine Hess, Associate Curator of Sculpture and Works of Art.

Ceramics And Civilization

Author: Prudence M. Rice
Publisher: Wiley-American Ceramic Society
ISBN: 9781574980264
Size: 36.19 MB
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Ceramics And Civilization from the Author: Prudence M. Rice. Application of heat to clay transforms it into a ceramic, and thus the history and technical features of structures supplying that heat - kilns - are of considerable importance. The 14 chapters in this volume discuss ancient and historic kilns from the viewpoint of their excavation, their operational principles, and their contributions to an understanding of ceramic production within ancient economies.

Domestic Ceramic Production And Spatial Organization

Author: Philip J. Arnold
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521545839
Size: 40.64 MB
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Domestic Ceramic Production And Spatial Organization from the Author: Philip J. Arnold. This ethnoarchaeological study looks at contemporary household-scale ceramic production in several Mexican communities. Many archaeologists have investigated ceramic production in the archaeological record, but their identifying criteria are often vague and impressionistic. Philip Arnold pinpoints some of the weaknesses of their interpretations and uses ethnographic research to suggest how archaeologists might consistently recognise ceramic manufacturing.

Pueblo Indians And Spanish Colonial Authority In Eighteenth Century New Mexico

Author: Tracy L. Brown
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816599068
Size: 65.62 MB
Format: PDF
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Pueblo Indians And Spanish Colonial Authority In Eighteenth Century New Mexico from the Author: Tracy L. Brown. Pueblo people reacted to Spanish colonialism in many different ways. While some resisted change and struggled to keep to their long-standing traditions, others reworked old practices or even adopted Spanish ones. Pueblo Indians and Spanish Colonial Authority in Eighteenth-Century New Mexico examines the multiple approaches Pueblo individuals and villages adopted to mitigate and manage the demands that Spanish colonial authorities made upon them. In doing so, author Tracy L. Brown counters the prevailing argument that Pueblo individuals and communities’ only response to Spanish colonialism was to compartmentalize—and thus freeze in time and space—their traditions behind a cultural “iron curtain.” Brown addresses an understudied period of Pueblo Indian/Spanish colonial history of New Mexico with a work that paints a portrait of pre-contact times through the colonial period with a special emphasis on the eighteenth century. The Pueblo communities that the Spaniards encountered were divided by language, religion,and political and kinship organization. Brown highlights the changes to, but also the maintenance of, social practices and beliefs in the economic, political, spiritual and familial and intimate realms of life that resulted from Pueblo attempts to negotiate Spanish colonial power. The author combines an analysis of eighteenth century Spanish documentation with archaeological findings concerning Pueblo beliefs and practices that spans the pre-contact period to the eighteenth century in the Southwest. Brown presents a nonlinear view of Pueblo life that examines politics, economics, ritual, and personal relationships. The book paints a portrait of the Pueblo peoples and their complex responses to Spanish colonialism by making sense of little-researched archival documents and archaeological findings that cast light on the daily life of Pueblo peoples.