Capital And Corporal Punishment In Anglo Saxon England

Author: Jay Paul Gates
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd
ISBN: 1843839180
Size: 60.71 MB
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Capital And Corporal Punishment In Anglo Saxon England from the Author: Jay Paul Gates. Essays examining how punishment operated in England, from c.600 to the Norman Conquest.

Capital And Corporal Punishment In Anglo Saxon England

Author: Jay Paul Gates
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781782042983
Size: 12.97 MB
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Capital And Corporal Punishment In Anglo Saxon England from the Author: Jay Paul Gates. Anglo-Saxon authorities often punished lawbreakers with harsh corporal penalties, such as execution, mutilation and imprisonment. Despite their severity, however, these penalties were not arbitrary exercises of power. Rather, they were informed by nuanced philosophies of punishment which sought to resolve conflict, keep the peace and enforce Christian morality. The ten essays in this volume engage legal, literary, historical, and archaeological evidence to investigate the role of punishment in Anglo-Saxon society. Three dominant themes emerge in the collection. First is the shift from a culture of retributive feud to a system of top-down punishment, in which penalties were imposed by an authority figure responsible for keeping the peace. Second is the use of spectacular punishment to enhance royal standing, as Anglo-Saxon kings sought to centralize and legitimize their power. Third is the intersection of secular punishment and penitential practice, as Christian authorities tempered penalties for material crime with concern for the souls of the condemned. Together, these studies demonstrate that in Anglo-Saxon England, capital and corporal punishments were considered necessary, legitimate, and righteous methods of social control. Jay Paul Gates is Assistant Professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in The City University of New York; Nicole Marafioti is Assistant Professor of History and co-director of the Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. Contributors: Valerie Allen, Jo Buckberry, Daniela Fruscione, Jay Paul Gates, Stefan Jurasinski, Nicole Marafioti, Daniel O'Gorman, Lisi Oliver, Andrew Rabin, Daniel Thomas.

Sanctuary And Crime In The Middle Ages 400 1500

Author: Karl Shoemaker
Publisher: Fordham Univ Press
ISBN: 0823232689
Size: 57.71 MB
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Sanctuary And Crime In The Middle Ages 400 1500 from the Author: Karl Shoemaker. Sanctuary law has not received very much scholarly attention. According to the prevailing explanation among earlier generations of legal historians, sanctuary was an impediment to effective criminal law and social control but was made necessary by rampant violence and weak political order in the medieval world. Contrary to the conclusions of the relatively scant literature on the topic, Sanctuary and Crime in the Middle Ages, 400-1500 argues that the practice of sanctuary was not simply an instrumental device intended as a response to weak and splintered medieval political authority. Nor can sanctuary laws be explained as simple ameliorative responses to harsh medieval punishments and the specter of uncontrolled blood-feuds. --

Qualities Of Mercy

Author: Carolyn Strange
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 0774841508
Size: 40.95 MB
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Qualities Of Mercy from the Author: Carolyn Strange. Qualities of Mercy deals with the history of mercy, the remittance of punishments in the criminal law. The writers probe the discretionary use of power and inquire how it has been exercised to spare convicted criminals from the full might of the law. Drawing on the history of England, Canada, and Australia in periods when both capital and corporal punishment were still practised, they show that contrary to common assumptions the past was not a time of unmitigated terror and they ask what inspired restraint in punishment. They conclude that the ability to decide who lived and died -- through the exercise or denial of mercy -- reinforced the power structure.

Incarceration Nations

Author: Baz Dreisinger
Publisher: Other Press (NY)
ISBN: 9781590518991
Size: 31.26 MB
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Incarceration Nations from the Author: Baz Dreisinger. In this crucial study, named one of the Washington Post's Notable Nonfiction Books of 2016 and now in paperback, Baz Dreisinger goes behind bars in nine countries to investigate the current conditions in prisons worldwide. Beginning in Africa and ending in Europe, Incarceration Nations is a first-person odyssey through the prison systems of the world. Professor, journalist, and founder of the Prison-to-College-Pipeline program, Dreisinger looks into the human stories of incarcerated men and women and those who imprison them, creating a jarring, poignant view of a world to which most are denied access, and a rethinking of one of America's most far-reaching global exports: the modern prison complex. From serving as a restorative justice facilitator in a notorious South African prison and working with genocide survivors in Rwanda, to launching a creative writing class in an overcrowded Ugandan prison and coordinating a drama workshop for women prisoners in Thailand, Dreisinger examines the world behind bars with equal parts empathy and intellect. She journeys to Jamaica to visit a prison music program, to Singapore to learn about approaches to prisoner reentry, to Australia to grapple with the bottom line of private prisons, to a federal supermax in Brazil to confront the horrors of solitary confinement, and finally to the so-called model prisons of Norway. Incarceration Nations concludes with climactic lessons about the past, present, and future of justice.

An Eye For An Eye

Author: Mitchel P. Roth
Publisher: Reaktion Books
ISBN: 1780233817
Size: 44.96 MB
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An Eye For An Eye from the Author: Mitchel P. Roth. From “an eye for an eye” to debates over capital punishment, humanity has a long and controversial relationship with doling out justice for criminal acts. Today, crime and punishment remain significant parts of our culture, but societies vary greatly on what is considered criminal and how it should be punished. In this global survey of crime and punishment throughout history, Mitchel P. Roth examines how and why we penalize certain activities, and he scrutinizes the effectiveness of such efforts in both punishing wrongdoers and bringing a sense of justice to victims. Drawing on anthropology, archaeology, folklore, and literature, Roth chronicles the global history of crime and punishment—from early civilizations to the outlawing of sex crimes and serial homicide to the development of organized crime and the threat today of global piracy. He explores the birth of the penitentiary and the practice of incarceration as well as the modern philosophy of rehabilitation, arguing that these are perhaps the most important advances in the effort to safeguard citizens from harm. Looking closely at the retributions societies have condoned, Roth also look at execution and its many forms, showing how stoning, hemlock, the firing squad, and lethal injection are considered either barbaric or justified across different cultures. Ultimately, he illustrates that despite advances in every level of human experience, there is remarkable continuity in what is considered a crime and the sanctions administered. Perfect for students, academics, and general readers alike, this interdisciplinary book provides a fascinating look at criminality and its consequences.

The History Of Punishment

Author: Lewis Lyons
Publisher: Amber Books
ISBN: 9781782744894
Size: 51.93 MB
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The History Of Punishment from the Author: Lewis Lyons. Crime has been part of human society for centuries. It has been punished in many ways: from banishment to flogging and the death penalty. The History of Punishment reviews the penalties imposed in different cultures and times, addressing some intriguing questions: - Can imprisonment reform a criminal? - How can a punishment be made to fit the crime? - Who should decide what is fit punishment - should the victim have a say? This book takes a wide view of legally imposed punishment, looking at how it has been used in different societies (from Singapore to Pakistan) and different times (from ancient Greece right up to the present day). Alongside the clear and informative text, historical etchings and artworks as well as archive and press photographs offer a complete portrait of imprisonment, deportation, corporal punishment and the death penalty.

The Beginnings Of English Law

Author: Lisi Oliver
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442669225
Size: 72.72 MB
Format: PDF
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The Beginnings Of English Law from the Author: Lisi Oliver. The laws of Æthelbert of Kent (ca. 600), Hlohere and Eadric (685x686), and Wihtred (695), are the earliest laws from Anglo-Saxon England, and the first Germanic laws written in the vernacular. They are of unique importance as the only extant early medieval English laws that delineate the progress of law and legal language in the early days of the conversion to Christianity. Æthelbert's laws, the closest existing equivalent to Germanic law as it was transmitted in a pre-literate period, contrast with Hlohere and Eadric's expanded laws, which concentrate on legal procedure and process, and again contrast with the further changed laws of Wihtred which demonstrate how the new religion of Christianity adapted and changed the law to conform to changing social mores. This volume updates previous works with current scholarship in the fields of linguistics and social and legal history to present new editions and translations of these three Kentish pre-Alfredian laws. Each body of law is situated within its historical, literary, and legal context, annotated, and provided with facing-page translation.