Buddhist Nuns And Gendered Practice

Author: Nirmala S. Salgado
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199760012
Size: 27.22 MB
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Buddhist Nuns And Gendered Practice from the Author: Nirmala S. Salgado. Nirmala S. Salgado offers a groundbreaking study of the politics of representation of Buddhist nuns. Challenging assumptions about writing on gender and Buddhism, Salgado raises important theoretical questions about the applicability of liberal feminist concepts and language to the practices of Buddhist nuns. Based on extensive research in Sri Lanka as well as on interviews with Theravada and Tibetan nuns from around the world, Salgado's study invites a reconsideration of female renunciation. How do scholarly narratives continue to be complicit in reinscribing colonialist and patriarchal stories about Buddhist women? In what ways have recent debates contributed to the construction of the subject of the Theravada bhikkhuni? How do key Buddhist concepts such as dukkha, samsara, and sila ground female renunciant practices? Salgado's provocative analysis of modern discourses about the supposed empowerment of nuns challenges interpretations of female renunciation articulated in terms of secular notions such as ''freedom'' in renunciation, and questions the idea that the higher ordination of nuns constitutes a movement in which female renunciants act as agents seeking to assert their autonomy in a struggle against patriarchal norms. Salgado argues that the concept of a global sisterhood of nuns-an idea grounded in a notion of equality as a universal ideal-promotes a discourse of dominance about the lives of non-Western women and calls for more nuanced readings of the everyday renunciant practices and lives of Buddhist nuns. Buddhist Nuns and Gendered Practice is essential reading for anyone interested in the connections between religion and power, subjectivity and gender, and feminism and postcolonialism.

Burma S Mass Lay Meditation Movement

Author: Ingrid Jordt
Publisher: Ohio University Press
ISBN: 0896804577
Size: 43.13 MB
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Burma S Mass Lay Meditation Movement from the Author: Ingrid Jordt. Burma's Mass Lay Meditation Movement: Buddhism and the Cultural Construction of Power describes a transformation in Buddhist practice in contemporary Burma. This revitalization movement has had real consequences for how the oppressive military junta, in power since the early 1960s, governs the country. Drawing on more than ten years of extensive fieldwork in Burma, Ingrid Jordt explains how vipassanā meditation has brought about a change of worldview for millions of individuals, enabling them to think and act independently of the totalitarian regime. She addresses human rights as well as the relationship between politics and religion in a country in which neither the government nor the people clearly separates the two. Jordt explains how the movement has been successful in its challenge to the Burmese military dictatorship where democratically inspired resistance movements have failed. Jordt's unsurpassed access to the centers of political and religious power in Burma becomes the reader's opportunity to witness the political workings of one of the world's most secretive and tyrannically ruled countries. Burma's Mass Lay Meditation Movement is a valuable contribution to Buddhist studies as well as anthropology, religious studies, and political science.

Making Fields Of Merit

Author: Monica Lindberg Falk
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 64.99 MB
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Making Fields Of Merit from the Author: Monica Lindberg Falk. Presents a unique ethnography of the Thai Buddhist nuns, examines what it implies to be a female ascetic in contemporary Thailand, and analyses how the ordained state for women fits into the wider gender patterns found in Thai society.

South Asian Buddhism

Author: Stephen C. Berkwitz
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135689830
Size: 21.58 MB
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South Asian Buddhism from the Author: Stephen C. Berkwitz. South Asian Buddhism presents a comprehensive historical survey of the full range of Buddhist traditions throughout South Asia from the beginnings of the religion up to the present. Starting with narratives on the Buddha’s life and foundational teachings from ancient India, the book proceeds to discuss the rise of Buddhist monastic organizations and texts among the early Mainstream Buddhist schools. It considers the origins and development of Mahayana Buddhism in South Asia, surveys the development of Buddhist Tantra in South Asia and outlines developments in Buddhism as found in Sri Lanka and Nepal following the decline of the religion in India. Berkwitz also importantly considers the effects of colonialism and modernity on the revivals of Buddhism across South Asia in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. South Asian Buddhism offers a broad, yet detailed perspective on the history, culture, and thought of the various Buddhist traditions that developed in South Asia. Incorporating findings from the latest research on Buddhist texts and culture, this work provides a critical, historically based survey of South Asian Buddhism that will be useful for students, scholars, and general readers.

Being A Buddhist Nun

Author: Kim Gutschow
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674012875
Size: 49.13 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Being A Buddhist Nun from the Author: Kim Gutschow. This richly textured profile of a little-known culture offers the first ethnography of Tibetan Buddhist society from the perspective of its nuns. Gutschow lived for more than three years among these women, collecting their stories, observing their ways, and studying their lives. The result provides valuable insight into the relationship between women and religion in South Asia today.

Charming Cadavers

Author: Liz Wilson
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226900544
Size: 61.28 MB
Format: PDF
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Charming Cadavers from the Author: Liz Wilson. In this highly original study of sexuality, desire, the body, and women, Liz Wilson investigates first-millennium Buddhist notions of spirituality. She argues that despite the marginal role women played in monastic life, they occupied a very conspicuous place in Buddhist hagiographic literature. In narratives used for the edification of Buddhist monks, women's bodies in decay (diseased, dying, and after death) served as a central object for meditation, inspiring spiritual growth through sexual abstention and repulsion in the immediate world. Taking up a set of universal concerns connected with the representation of women, Wilson displays the pervasiveness of androcentrism in Buddhist literature and practice. She also makes persuasive use of recent historical work on the religious lives of women in medieval Christianity, finding common ground in the role of miraculous afflictions. This lively and readable study brings provocative new tools and insights to the study of women in religious life.

From Stone To Flesh

Author: Donald S. Lopez Jr.
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226493202
Size: 12.23 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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From Stone To Flesh from the Author: Donald S. Lopez Jr.. We have come to admire Buddhism for being profound but accessible, as much a lifestyle as a religion. The credit for creating Buddhism goes to the Buddha, a figure widely respected across the Western world for his philosophical insight, his teachings of nonviolence, and his practice of meditation. But who was this Buddha, and how did he become the Buddha we know and love today? Leading historian of Buddhism Donald S. Lopez Jr. tells the story of how various idols carved in stone—variously named Beddou, Codam, Xaca, and Fo—became the man of flesh and blood that we know simply as the Buddha. He reveals that the positive view of the Buddha in Europe and America is rather recent, originating a little more than a hundred and fifty years ago. For centuries, the Buddha was condemned by Western writers as the most dangerous idol of the Orient. He was a demon, the murderer of his mother, a purveyor of idolatry. Lopez provides an engaging history of depictions of the Buddha from classical accounts and medieval stories to the testimonies of European travelers, diplomats, soldiers, and missionaries. He shows that centuries of hostility toward the Buddha changed dramatically in the nineteenth century, when the teachings of the Buddha, having disappeared from India by the fourteenth century, were read by European scholars newly proficient in Asian languages. At the same time, the traditional view of the Buddha persisted in Asia, where he was revered as much for his supernatural powers as for his philosophical insights. From Stone to Flesh follows the twists and turns of these Eastern and Western notions of the Buddha, leading finally to his triumph as the founder of a world religion.

Changing Homelands

Author: Neeti Nair
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674057791
Size: 28.91 MB
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Changing Homelands from the Author: Neeti Nair. Neeti Nair’s account of the partition in the Punjab rejects the idea that essential differences between the Hindu and Muslim communities made political settlement impossible. Far from being an inevitable solution, partition—though advocated by some powerful Hindus—was a stunning surprise to the majority of Hindus in the region.

Gender Politics In Asia

Author: Wil Lundström-Burghoorn
Publisher: NIAS Press
ISBN: 8776940152
Size: 51.25 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Gender Politics In Asia from the Author: Wil Lundström-Burghoorn. Summary: "This book demonstrates the great diversity in gender politics and womenÊŒs strategies to negotiate and change gender relations individually or collectively. It examines cultural complexities of gender by focusing on gender politics in Asia, with case studis from China, Japan, Singapore, the Philippines, Thailand and Malaysia. It examines multiple aspects of gender politics (dress, healing, religious ordination, NGO activism, etc.), bringing to bear interdisciplinary approaches of inquiry based on in-depth empirical data."--Publisher description.

Himalayan Hermitess

Author: Kurtis R. Schaeffer
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198034919
Size: 67.97 MB
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Himalayan Hermitess from the Author: Kurtis R. Schaeffer. Himalayan Hermitess is a vivid account of the life and times of a Buddhist nun living on the borderlands of Tibetan culture. Orgyan Chokyi (1675-1729) spent her life in Dolpo, the highest inhabited region of the Nepal Himalayas. Illiterate and expressly forbidden by her master to write her own life story, Orgyan Chokyi received divine inspiration, defied tradition, and composed one of the most engaging autobiographies of the Tibetan literary tradition. The Life of Orgyan Chokyi is the oldest known autobiography authored by a Tibetan woman, and thus holds a critical place in both Tibetan and Buddhist literature. In it she tells of the sufferings of her youth, the struggle to escape menial labor and become a hermitess, her dreams and visionary experiences, her relationships with other nuns, the painstaking work of contemplative practice, and her hard-won social autonomy and high-mountain solitude. In process it develops a compelling vision of the relation between gender, the body, and suffering from a female Buddhist practitioner's perspective. Part One of Himalayan Hermitess presents a religious history of Orgyan Chokyi's Himalayan world, the Life of Orgyan Chokyi as a work of literature, its portrayal of sorrow and joy, its perspectives on suffering and gender, as well as the diverse religious practices found throughout the work. Part Two offers a full translation of the Life of Orgyan Chokyi. Based almost entirely upon Tibetan documents never before translated, Himalayan Hermitess is an accessible introduction to Buddhism in the premodern Himalayas.